Want to know more about your dog? Start with getting to know their breed's deeds

Affenpinscher Breed

 

Loyal, curious, and famously amusing, this almost-human toy dog is fearless out of all proportion to his size. As with all great comedians, it's the Affenpinscher's apparent seriousness of purpose that makes his antics all the more amusing.

The Affen's apish look has been described many ways. They've been called 'monkey dogs' and 'ape terriers.' The French say diablotin moustachu ('mustached little devil'), and Star Wars fans argue whether they look more like Wookies or Ewoks. Standing less than a foot tall, these sturdy terrier-like dogs approach life with great confidence. 'This isn't a breed you train, 'a professional dog handler tells us, 'He's like a human. You befriend him.' The dense, harsh coat is described as 'neat but shaggy' and comes in several colors; the gait is light and confident. They can be willful and domineering, but mostly Affens are loyal, affectionate, and always entertaining. Affen people say they love being owned by their little monkey dogs.

Grooming Tips

The Affenpinscher's medium-length, wiry coat should be groomed twice a week, first with a brush and then with a metal comb. Any mats should be pulled apart with the fingers. The hair on the head is usually brushed forward over the face, and then an inverted V-shape is cut to expose the eyes. Similarly, the hair on the bridge of the nose is trimmed into a fan shape to keep the eyes clear. The Affen's coat does not grow quickly, so a trimming a pet Affen every few months should suffice. The breed's national parent club, the Affenpinscher Club of America, provides a detailed grooming guide. Affens should also have their nails trimmed and their teeth brushed regularly.

 

Afghan Hound Breed

 

About the Breed

Among the most eye-catching of all dog breeds, the Afghan Hound is an aloof and dignified aristocrat of sublime beauty. Despite his regal appearance, the Afghan can exhibit an endearing streak of silliness and a profound loyalty.

Since ancient times, Afghan Hounds have been famous for their elegant beauty. But the thick, silky, flowing coat that is the breed's crowning glory isn't just for show ' it served as protection from the harsh climate in mountainous regions where Afghans originally earned their keep. Beneath the Afghan's glamorous exterior is a powerful, agile hound ' standing as high as 27 inches at the shoulder ' built for a long day's hunt. Their huge paw-pads acted as shock absorbers on their homeland's punishing terrain.  The Afghan Hound is a special breed for special people. A breed expert writes, 'It's not the breed for all would-be dog owners, but where the dog and owner combination is right, no animal can equal the Afghan Hound as a pet.'

Afghan puppies have short, fuzzy coats (including adorable facial hair called 'monkey whiskers') that require little maintenance. They don't stay that way for long, however. As is to be expected, the long, silky coat of an adolescent or adult Afghan requires regular grooming. Several hours per week of brushing are needed to keep the hair free of tangles and mats, as well as to remove any debris. Keeping the hair clean and mat-free is the key to keeping the Afghan's glorious coat looking its best. Regular bathing, with shampoo and conditioner, is also required. Like all breeds, Afghans should have their nails trimmed and their teeth brushed regularly.

 

Airedale Terrier Breed

 

His size, strength, and unflagging spirit have earned the Airedale Terrier the nickname 'The King of Terriers.' The Airedale stands among the world's most versatile dog breeds and has distinguished himself as hunter, athlete, and companion.

The Airedale Terrier is the largest of all terrier breeds. Males stand about 23 inches at the shoulder, females a little less. The dense, wiry coat is tan with black markings. Long, muscular legs give Airedales a regal lift in their bearing, and the long head'¿with its sporty beard and mustache, dark eyes, and neatly folded ears'¿conveys a keen intelligence. Airedales are the very picture of an alert and willing terrier'¿only bigger. And, like his smaller cousins in the terrier family, he can be bold, determined, and stubborn. Airedales are docile and patient with kids but won't back down when protecting hearth and home. Thanks to their famous do-it-all attitude, Airedales excel in all kinds of sports and family activities.

Grooming Tips

The Airedale has a short, wiry coat that needs relatively little maintenance. Weekly brushing keeps the coat looking good and has the additional advantage of removing dead hair that would otherwise be shed around the house. (Some people with dog allergies have found that they can share a living space with a well-brushed Airedale without suffering any symptoms.) If the weekly session turns up any mats, they should be broken up with the fingers and then teased apart with a comb. Full grooming '¿ where the dog is bathed, brushed, and stripped or clipped '¿ should be done three or four times a year, either by the owner or a professional groomer.

 

Akita Breed

 

The Akita is a muscular, double-coated dog of ancient Japanese lineage famous for their dignity, courage, and loyalty. In their native land, they're venerated as family protectors and symbols of good health, happiness, and long life.

Akitas are burly, heavy-boned spitz-type dogs of imposing stature. Standing 24 to 28 inches at the shoulder, Akitas have a dense coat that comes in several colors, including white. The head is broad and massive, and is balanced in the rear by a full, curled-over tail. The erect ears and dark, shining eyes contribute to an expression of alertness, a hallmark of the breed. Akitas are quiet, fastidious dogs. Wary of strangers and often intolerant of other animals, Akitas will gladly share their silly, affectionate side with family and friends. They thrive on human companionship. The large, independent-thinking Akita is hardwired for protecting those they love. They must be well socialized from birth with people and other dogs.

Grooming Tips

Akitas tend to be clean and have little 'doggy odor.' They don't require extensive grooming, but their thick, luxurious double coat should be brushed at least once a week to look its best. Although Akitas shed only minimally most of the time, expect their dense undercoat to 'blow' twice a year, where it will shed so profusely that it comes out in clumps all over your house. During this time it helps to brush the dog more frequently to get rid of the dead coat. The nails should also be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can cause pain and problems for the dog. Remember also to brush the dog's teeth often to ensure dental health.

 

Alaskan Klee Kai Breed

 

The Alaskan Klee Kai is a small-sized companion dog that is alert, energetic, and curious, yet reserved with unfamiliar people and situations. 

The Alaskan Klee Kai is a small sized companion dog with a smooth, agile, and well-balanced gait, a body that is well proportioned with a level topline and a length slightly longer than height.  The wedge-shaped head, erect triangle shaped ears, well furred double coat in three symmetrical contrasting color varieties, and a loosely curled tail reflect its arctic heritage. 

Grooming Tips

The Alaskan Klee Kai (AKK) is a double coated breed, with a short dense undercoat and a longer outer coat of guard hairs. This coat not only helps insulate them from the cold and heat, it also helps protect the skin from the sun. While the undercoat is shed (or blown) twice a year, some owners quip that it lasts for six months at a time. Weekly brushings and/or combing help keep the coat and skin in good condition, and help reduce the hair around the house.  AKK often need only a few baths a year as their coats tend to naturally repel dirt, and they do not have the ¿dog odor¿ that many breeds have. Blowing the dog with a strong cool blow-dryer is also a good way to remove loose hair and dirt. Avoid using any tools with blades. The nails should be trimmed regularly to prevent any foot problems.  Alaskan Klee Kai competing in conformation require a bit more selective grooming or bathing for the best presentation. The breed standard is specific: "The Alaskan Klee Kai is shown in its natural state and the only trimming permissible is around the foot area to present a clean/neat appearance. Any trimming of the whiskers, or the fur on any other part of the dog, is to be severely penalized."

 

Alaskan Malamute Breed

 

An immensely strong, heavy-duty worker of spitz type, the Alaskan Malamute is an affectionate, loyal, and playful but dignified dog recognizable by his well-furred plumed tail carried over the back, erect ears, and substantial bone. The Alaskan Malamute stands 23 to 25 inches at the shoulder and weighs 75 to 85 pounds. Everything about Mals suggests their origin as an arctic sled dog: The heavy bone, deep chest, powerful shoulders, and dense, weatherproof coat all scream, 'I work hard for a living!' But their almond-shaped brown eyes have an affectionate sparkle, suggesting Mals enjoy snuggling with their humans when the workday is done. Mals are pack animals. And in your family 'pack,' the leader must be you. If a Mal doesn't respect you, he will wind up owning you instead of the other way around. Firm but loving training should begin in early puppyhood. That said, a well-behaved Mal is a joy to be with'¿playful, gentle, friendly, and great with kids.

Grooming Tips

The thick, waterproof double coat of the Alaskan Malamute is beautifully adapted to harsh Arctic life, but it requires constant upkeep. A Malamute should be brushed every day with a pin brush and metal comb, all the while checking for mats, which can harbor fungus, and hot spots, which can become infected. Twice a year, during shedding season, an undercoat rake should be added to the regimen. Show Malamutes are often bathed weekly, but a pet Malamute can go six to eight weeks between baths.  Conditioner can be used, in moderation, if the coat feels dry. As with all breeds, the Malamute's nails should be trimmed regularly.

 

American Bulldog Breed

 

American Bulldogs are a well-balanced athletic dog that demonstrate great strength, endurance, agility, and a friendly attitude. Historically, they were bred to be a utility dog used for working the farm.

The American Bulldog is a descendant of the English Bulldog. It is believed that the bulldog was in America as early as the 17th century. They came to the United States in the 1800s, with immigrants who brought their working bulldogs with them. Small farmers and ranchers used this all-around working dog for many tasks including farm guardians, stock dogs, and catch dogs. The breed largely survived, particularly in the southern states, due to its ability to bring down and catch feral pigs.

 

The breed we know as the American Bulldog was originally known by many different names before the name American Bulldog became the standard. In different parts of the South he was known as the White English Southern Bulldog, but most commonly just "bulldog." The breed was not called a bulldog because of a certain look, but because they did real bulldog work.

Grooming Tips

Grooming your American Bulldog can be a pretty easy task. This breed does not need to be bathed often, only occasional baths when they become dirty. Regular brushing will help keep their coat clean and shiny. Their nails should be trimmed every few weeks and ears should be cleaned once a month or as needed. Their teeth should be brushed regularly. Seasonal shedding is to be expected.

 

American English Coonhound Breed

 

These sleek and racy, lean but muscular hounds work dusk to dawn in pursuit of the wily raccoon. The sight of the American English Coonhound tearing through the moonlit woods, all sinew and determination, bawling their lusty night music, is coon-hunter heaven. Standing as high as 26 inches at the shoulder, American English Coonhounds are deep-chested, sweet-faced athletes beloved by sportsmen for their speed and endurance. Stretched tightly across the athletic frame is a medium-length coat of various patterns, some with ticking. The head is broad with a domed skull, with soft, low-hung ears and dark-brown eyes that glow with warmth and kindness. American English Coonhounds are mellow when off duty but tenacious and stubborn in pursuit of their ring-tailed prey. Their work drive and energy, the patience it takes to train them for things other than coon hunting, and their loud, ringing bark can make the breed a bad fit as house pets for novice owners. Some passionate fans of American English Coonhounds feel that without a sporting outlet for this breed's houndy virtues, you're simply wasting a good dog.

Grooming Tips

Good nutrition influences the shine and texture of your American English Coonhound's coat from the inside, but he will still need regular grooming to be at his best. His short, hard, protective coat requires a minimum of care. Using a shedding tool or a grooming mitt with rubber nubs at least weekly will help to keep his shedding to a minimum. This also distributes skin oils down the hair shaft, giving his coat a natural shine. His nails should be trimmed once a month, and a bath every four to six weeks will keep the coat and skin clean and healthy, and reduce doggy odor. His ears should be checked weekly and gently cleaned of any excess wax or debris.

 

American Eskimo Dog Breed

 

The American Eskimo Dog combines striking good looks with a quick and clever mind in a total brains-and-beauty package. Neither shy nor aggressive, Eskies are always alert and friendly, though a bit conservative when making new friends. The American Eskimo Dog comes in three sizes'¿standard, miniature, and toy'¿standing as tall as 19 inches at the shoulder or as short as 9 inches. Distinctive traits include a dense, sparkling white coat with a lion-like ruff around the chest and shoulders; a smiling face, with black nose, lips, and eye-rims that convey a keen, intelligent expression; and a plumed tail carried over the back. Some Eskies have markings with the delicious color name 'biscuit cream.' They move with a bold and agile gait. Eskies are social animals and can develop problem behaviors when neglected or undertrained'¿they insist on being part of family life. Among the most trainable of breeds, the clever, kid-friendly Eskie practically invented the phrase 'eager to please.'

 

Grooming Tips

The American Eskimo Dog's fluffy, white double coat '¿ a short, dense undercoat below the longer outer coat '¿ is surprisingly easy to keep clean. However, Eskies shed almost constantly. A thorough brushing two or three times a week will remove dead hairs before they can be shed, as well as help to prevent matting. The oil on an Eskie's fur prevents dirt from adhering, so a good brushing is usually enough to remove it. It is OK to bathe an Eskie occasionally, but doing so more than once every few months can make his skin dry and irritated. As with all breeds, the Eskie's nails should be trimmed regularly.

 

American Foxhound Breed

 

American Foxhounds are good-natured, low-maintenance hounds who get on well with kids, dogs, even cats, but come with special considerations for prospective owners. They are closely associated with Revolutionary heroes and the rolling estates of old Virginia. American Foxhounds are sleek, rangy hunters known for their speed, endurance, and work ethic. You can tell the American Foxhound apart from their British cousin the English Foxhound by length of leg'¿the American's legs are longer and more finely boned'¿and by the American's slightly arched loin (back end). American Foxhounds have large, soft eyes with an expression described as gentle and pleading. So far, so good. But Foxhounds come with special considerations. They need lots of exercise or they can get depressed and destructive. A Foxhound's single-minded prey drive must be managed. Their loud bawling is melodious to hound lovers but can be a nuisance to neighbors, and training and housebreaking these independent souls can be a steep challenge for novice owners.

Grooming Tips:

The American Foxhound's handsome coat is short and lies close to the body. The coat's hard texture protects the dog from the underbrush he courses through while on the hunt'¿and the coat also happens to be extremely easy to take care of. A short, once-a-week session with a bristle brush, a rubber grooming mitt or tool, or a hound glove is usually all that is needed. The Foxhound should not need to be bathed unless he gets into something particularly messy while outdoors. As with all breeds, the American Foxhound'¿s nails should be trimmed regularly.Source

 

American Hairless Terrier Breed

 

The American Hairless Terrier, a Louisiana native, is a smart, inquisitive, and playful dog that comes in hairless and coated varieties. He is a fine choice for allergy sufferers who want a dog with true terrier grit and courage.

The American Hairless Terrier stands between 12 to 16 inches at the shoulder, and comes in both coated and hairless varieties. The hairless variety might have eyebrows and whiskers, while the coated has a short, shiny coat. The skin of the hairless is smooth and warm to the touch. The broad, wedge-shaped head is a hallmark of both varieties. Erect, V-shaped ears frame the round, expressive eyes that gleam with curiosity.

 

 The American Hairless moves with jaunty pep in his step that announces real terrier attitude. The hairless variety is as hypoallergenic as a dog can get. Hairlessness, though, presents its own challenges. Sunburn is a concern, and cold weather requires special precautions. This breed is protective of their humans and make alert watchdogs.

Grooming Tips

The American Hairless Terrier actually comes in two varieties: coated and hairless. For either type, grooming needs are minimal. For the hairless variety, there is little maintenance involved other than keeping the ears clean and making sure the dog is protected from sunburn. The variety with a short, shiny coat is almost as carefree. They hardly shed, so all that's called for is a quick session with a soft bristle brush once a week, and an occasional bath as needed. As with all breeds, the American Hairless Terrier'¿s nails should be trimmed regularly.

 

American Leopard Hound Breed

 

Intelligence is one of the American Leopard Hound's very best attributes. The breed is loving and affectionate toward their family and they are extremely protective of children. American Leopards are one of the oldest tree dog breeds in the U.S. and have extremely strong tracking abilities, often able to track prey for miles.

The American Leopard Hound is a medium to large size dog and comes in three patterns: Solid, Leopard and Brindle; nine different official colors; and a variety of markings, however, sixty percent of all American Leopards are solid-colored dogs. The breed is very versatile in hunting a variety of game species including, but not limited to, raccoon, bear, bobcat, cougar, squirrel, and any other tree-minded game. As an especially tough breed, they also fare exceptionally well in extreme weather, both hot and cold.    

Grooming Tips

Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your dog. American Leopard Hounds have a smooth, dense, double coat; the outer coat is rough and the undercoat is fine and wooly. Beyond regular weekly brushing, the occasional bath will keep them clean and looking their best. Their strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

 

American Staffordshire Terrier Breed

 

The American Staffordshire Terrier, known to their fans as AmStaffs, are smart, confident, good-natured companions. Their courage is proverbial. A responsibly bred, well-socialized AmStaff is a loyal, trustworthy friend to the end. AmStaffs are stocky, muscular bull-type terriers standing 17 to 19 inches at the shoulder. The head is broad, the jaws well defined, the cheekbones pronounced, and the dark, round eyes are set wide apart. AmStaff movement is agile and graceful, with a springy gait that advertises the breed's innate confidence. The stiff, glossy coat comes in many colors and patterns. AmStaffers describe their dogs as keenly aware of their surroundings, game for anything, and lovable 'personality dogs' around the house. AmStaffs like mental and physical challenges. They are highly trainable, as their many forays into showbiz suggest. When acquiring an AmStaff, there's only one way to go: Do your homework and find a responsible AKC breeder.

Grooming Tips:

Taking care of the AmStaff's short, stiff coat is remarkably easy. A quick once-over with a soft bristle brush every week is usually enough to remove any dirt or other foreign matter. What's more, a good brushing distributes skin oils throughout the coat to help keep it healthy. If an Am Staff gets into something particularly messy, a bath will probably be called for. Otherwise, bathing can wait until when and if he develops a 'doggy' smell. As with all breeds, the AmStaff'¿s nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can be painful and cause the dog problems while walking and running.Source

 

American Water Spaniel Breed

 

The American Water Spaniel, native to the lake country of the upper Midwest, is an upbeat, outdoorsy athlete who loves to hunt and swim. They are known to be happy, eager, and charming, though aloof with strangers and a bit stubborn. American Water Spaniels are muscular midsize gundogs, not flashy in looks or performance, and recognizable by a luscious brown coat that is either tightly curled or wavy. Bred to work the icy waters and marshy banks of the Great Lakes region, these spaniels are ideally outfitted for the job: The coat is dense and waterproof, the feet are thickly padded, the toes are webbed, and the body is small enough for the dog to hop in and out of a skiff without rocking the boat. The breed's admirers describe a merry, intelligent, and versatile spaniel suited to a variety of dog sports. As hunters, they combine the working traits of spaniels and retrievers. The key to the American Water Spaniel's happiness is activity, especially alongside their adored human. An underemployed dog can be barky and destructive.

Grooming Tips

The American Water Spaniel has a dense, waterproof coat that can be either tightly curled or wavy. The breed was bred to work in the icy waters of the Great Lakes region, and its insulating, double-layer coat makes that possible. Weekly grooming is required, but it is a fairly simple process. During the summer, the coat is sparser, and can be brought into shape with a rubber-tipped pin brush. The rest of the year, and especially during shedding season, a slicker brush should be used to remove the dead hair from the undercoat. As with all breeds, the American Water Spaniel'¿s nails should be trimmed regularly.

 

Anatolian Shepherd Dog Breed

 

An Anatolian Shepherd Dog is a rugged, imposing flock guardian of ancient lineage. Protective and territorial, but also intelligent, patient, and profoundly loyal, these muscular avengers are prized as working guard dogs without equal. The Anatolian Shepherd Dog stands between 27 and 29 inches at the shoulder and can weigh as much as 150 pounds. Profusely muscled but nimble afoot, Anatolians are more than a match for the predators and harsh terrain of their homeland. Anatolians descend from some of the oldest known domestic-canine bloodlines. This lends the breed a sense of timelessness, a no-frills, untouched quality that takes us back 6,000 years to the Bronze Age. Anatolians are smart, devoted, responsive, and adaptable. They will protect their flock'¿livestock, children, smaller dogs, even the family cat'¿with intensity. Anatolian owners must be strong leaders, willing and able to handle a dog as dominating and demanding as he is calm and loving.

Grooming Tips

Bred to work outdoors, the Anatolian has a thick undercoat that protects him from the elements. Some Anatolians have a long outer coat, but on most it is quite short, and a quick brushing once a week will keep it looking good. Keep in mind, though, that the Anatolian sheds his undercoat twice a year. During shedding season, he will need to given a thorough brushing-out to remove the dead hair, with a short-bristle brush and possibly a comb as well, every few days. As with all breeds, the Anatolian's nails should be trimmed regularly.

 

Appenzeller Sennenhund Breed

 

The Appenzeller Sennenhund is a medium sized herdng breed that is tri-color and almost squarely built and balanced. He is muscular and agile and makes a good driving, watch, guard, house or farm dog. Due to their versatility and willingness, they excel in agility, obedience, herding and search and rescue.

The Appenzeller Sennenhund is one of the four Swiss Sennen type breeds and is also known as the Appenzeller Mountain Dog or Appenzell Cattle Dog. He is lively, high-spirited, self-assured, reliable and fearless. Slightly suspicious of strangers, he is a good watchdog who cannot be bribed. The breed's intelligence make them highly capable learners. Due to his personality and exercise needs, he is ill-suited to apartment living.

Grooming Tips

Appenzellers have a firm double coat. The topcoat is thick and shiny, and the undercoat is a thick black, brown or gray. Weekly brushing is recommended with a firm brush to remove loose and dead hair. Check frequently for buildup of dirt and foreign bodies in the ears, and if you reside in tick-prone areas, always be sure to check your dog's ears and coat after coming in from walks.

 

Aussiedoodle (Australian Shepherd + Poodle) Breed

 

Aussiedoodle is a designer breed developed by crossing an Australian Shepherd with a Poodle. Also referred to as the Aussiepoodle or Aussiepoo, Aussiedoodles are loyal, playful and incredibly smart. Aussie Poodle mix dogs inherit some of the best traits from their purebred parents. Potential Aussie-Doodle owners can find important information about this hybrid's temperament, grooming needs as well as lifespan, size and exercise needs as well as learn how Aussiedoodles get along with kids and what is the best environment for this fascinating Poodle mix.

Aussiedoodles thrive in homes where they will be offered lots of exercise and attention. So long as children involved will handle the pups gently, these dogs are great for any family. With a high ability to bond quickly to a specific person, Aussiedoodles can be used as therapy dogs. In addition, their activity level is moderate to high. This means they will need active playtime or a good walk each day. Australian Shepherd Poodle mix dogs are also athletic enough, which gives them the ability to participate in sports for dogs such as flyball, agility, rally and obedience.

With both Aussiedoodle purebred parents considered as 'Einstein' breeds, it means your Aussiedoodle will need to very busy, failure to which your dog will find his own things to do that will mostly be destructive. Endeavor to keep him occupied by teaching Poodle Aussie mix dog to fetch and carry things around. You could also make your Aussiedoodle pull the gardening equipment within the yard. These dogs need a purposeful life and love it when they have something to do.

Just like their Australian Shepherd and Poodle parents, Aussiedoodles are very intelligent dogs that are eager to please their owners, a great trait that makes them easy to train. Aussiedoodles are great for first-time dog owners who are in a position of keeping up with their active pet's energy level. Aussiedoodle will always keep you entertained and active. Being so adorable makes these pooches very popular. If you decide to acquire an Aussiedoodle puppy, choose a reputable breeder who has done a health testing for the Australian Shepherd and Poodle parents to ensure the pup doesn't inherit genetic health issues that are common with the purebred parents. If you need to be rewarded with a great pet companion, start training and socializing the Aussiedoodle from when it's a puppy as you employ positive reinforcement techniques using praises, food rewards, and play times.

Grooming Tips

Being a mix of Poodles and Australian Shepherds, Aussiedoodles' coats and colors could be a blend of the two, but there can be varying characteristics depending on which genes dominates more. Aussiedoodle coats can have a solid color or a mixture of one of the following: blue merle, black, black and red tri, parti, black and tan, sable.

Their coats often have varying textures, with some being wavier and some with tighter curls from the Poodles. The Aussiedoodles that have shorter hair are ideal for people that suffer from allergies, but this isn't always guaranteed.

When it comes to tolerating extreme weather conditions, it depends on individual Aussiedoodles given their coat varieties. Generally, Aussiedoodles are usually in a better position to handle colder environments than other dogs, but it's always important to be cautious and bundle up in colder winters.

The Aussiedoodle requires a level of grooming that is dependent on the curliness of its coat. Those whose coats are wavier will need to be combed once or twice in a week, while those with curlier coats will need a little bit more grooming. These traits often depend on which parent was favored more by the offspring. More so, if Australian Shepherd traits become predominant, your Aussiedoodles' coat is likely to show a straighter characteristic.

Aussiedoodles will on average require being brushed frequently and trimmed once in two months. Amount of shedding may differ among Aussiedoodle dogs with some Aussiedoodles shedding more than others. Shedding can be successfully managed by regular use of deshedding brushes such as Hertzko Deshedding Tool.

 

Australian Cattle Dog Breed

 

The compact but muscular Australian Cattle Dog, also called Blue Heeler or Queensland Heeler, is related to Australia's famous wild dog, the Dingo. These resilient herders are intelligent enough to routinely outsmart their owners. Standing between 17 to 20 inches at the shoulder, the Australian Cattle Dog is a sturdy, hard-muscled herder of strength and agility. The ACD is born with a white coat that turns blue-gray or red. Both coat varieties feature distinctive mottling or specking patterns. ACDs have immense work drive and excel at hunting, chasing, and, of course, moving livestock. Their boundless energy and supple gait make them excellent running partners. ACDs are true-blue loyal, famously smart, ever alert, and wary of strangers. If an ACD isn't challenged, he easily becomes bored and gets into mischief. It is recommended that ACD owners participate with their dog in some work, sport, or regular exercise to keep him mentally and physically fit.

Grooming Tips

The Australian Cattle Dog was bred to work outdoors and has a smooth, double-layer coat that protects him from the elements. This coat has no odor or oily residue, so an Australian Cattle Dog generally needs just a quick brushing once a week and an occasional bath. Keep in mind, though, that the ACD sheds his undercoat twice a year. During shedding season, every few days he will need a thorough brushing-out to remove the dead hair, using a short-bristle brush and possibly a comb as well. As with all breeds, the Australian Cattle Dog'¿s nails should be trimmed regularly.

 

Australian Kelpie Breed

 

The Australian Kelpie is a lithe, active dog, capable of untiring work. He is extremely intelligent, alert, and eager with unlimited energy.

As a herding dog, the Australian Kelpie is intensely loyal and devoted to duty. He has a natural instinct and aptitude for working in sheep, whether it be in open fields or enclosed yards. This breed originated from Collie type dogs imported from Scotland, but was developed to withstand the harsh heat and dry conditions of the vast open spaces of Australia.

Grooming Tips

The Australian Kelpie has a double coat with a short, dense undercoat. The outer coat is close, each hair straight, hard and lying flat, so that it resists rain. Kelpies need weekly brushing or combing to remove dead hairs, and the occasional bath will keep them clean and looking their best. Otherwise, the Kelpie is a relatively low-maintenance breed.

 

Australian Shepherd Breed

 

The Australian Shepherd, a lean, tough ranch dog, is one of those 'only in America' stories: a European breed perfected in California by way of Australia. Fixtures on the rodeo circuit, they are closely associated with the cowboy life. The Australian Shepherd, the cowboy's herding dog of choice, is a medium-sized worker with a keen, penetrating gaze in the eye. Aussie coats offer different looks, including merle (a mottled pattern with contrasting shades of blue or red). In all ways, they're the picture of rugged and agile movers of stock. Aussies exhibit an irresistible impulse to herd, anything: birds, dogs, kids. This strong work drive can make Aussies too much dog for a sedentary pet owner. Aussies are remarkably intelligent, quite capable of hoodwinking an unsuspecting novice owner. In short, this isn't the pet for everyone. But if you're looking for a brainy, tireless, and trainable partner for work or sport, your search might end here.

Grooming Tips

In general, weekly brushing sessions will keep the Australian Shepherd's waterproof, double-layer coat looking its best. During shedding season, though, more work will be required. During this period an undercoat rake can be used every two or three days to remove the abundant dead hair, followed by a cleanup with the wire brush. Aussies often work and/or play outdoors, so it's not unusual for them to come in dirtier than they left. But unless they've gotten into a particularly messy situation, they require a bath only occasionally. As with all breeds, the Aussie'¿s nails should be trimmed regularly.

 

Australian Stumpy Tail Cattle Dog Breed

 

The Australian Stumpy Tail Cattle Dog is not an Australian Cattle Dog with a docked tail. They are naturally bob-tailed breed and stands square with plenty of leg length under the body.

There are major structural differences in breed type between the two breeds of Cattle Dogs. Stumpy Tail Cattle Dogs are a natural bob-tail breed. Some Stumpy Tail pups are born with long tails and should not be discarded from a breeding program if they are of structural quality, and bred back to quality natural bob tails. 

Grooming Tips

Requirements for grooming are minimal. Weekly brushing with a slicker brush and a small tooth comb will keep the coat in good condition. Bathing should be done when the dog gets dirty. Facial whiskers need not be removed. Toe nails should be kept short and dull. The toe nails can grow quickly and become very sharp.

 

Australian Terrier Breed

 

The diminutive Australian Terrier is plucky, spirited, and smart'¿how did they fit so much dog into such a bitty package? Upbeat and lively, the self-assured Aussie approaches life with plenty of the old-time terrier curiosity and grit. Australian Terriers are small but sturdy, self-confident terriers known for a longish torso, distinctive coat furnishings around the neck and forequarters, and a topknot of soft, silky hair that contrasts in texture with an otherwise harsh coat. A long neck lends a dash of elegance to this rough-and-ready terrier, and the dark eyes sparkle with a keen intelligence. Coat colors are blue-and-tan, or solid red or sandy. Aussies move with the free and easy gait of a working dog. They are alert watchdogs and said to be quick studies when training. True terriers, Aussies love digging, and the urge to chase small, furry critters has never left them. Not always a great fit in multi-dog households, Aussies want you all to themselves.

Grooming Tips

The Australian Terrier's harsh, weatherproof, double coat does a good job of repelling dirt and mud, and is very easy to maintain. A quick brushing once a week is usually enough to keep it in fine shape. The long hairs that grow in front of and between the eyes can irritate the eyes if left unchecked; fortunately, they are easily plucked out with tweezers or fingers. An Aussie should have a bath only when needed. Shampooing softens the harsh coat, rendering its dirt-shedding capability ineffective, and too much bathing can also make the Aussie's skin dry and flaky. As with all breeds, the Aussie'¿s nails should be trimmed regularly.

 

Azawakh Breed

 

Tall and elegant, the Azawakh is a West African sighthound who originates from the countries of Burkina Faso, Mali, and Niger. The Azawakh has a short, fine coat which may come in any color or color combinations: red, clear sand to fawn, brindled, parti-color (which may be predominantly white), blue, black and brown. The head may have a black mask and there may be white markings on the legs, bib and at the tip of tail. There are no color or marking disqualifications in the breed. Befitting its heritage, the Azawakh excels as a companion, guardian and a lure courser in the United States.

This ancient hunting hound is so lean and rangy that his bone structure and musculature can plainly be seen beneath his skin. The smooth S-shaped contours, deep chest, and aerodynamic head mark the Azwakh as a member of the sighthound family, canine sprinters that rely on keen vision and blazing speed to fix and course their prey. The ultrafine coat comes in several colors and patterns. The overall look of this leggy hound is one of elegance and fineness, but don't be fooled: This is a tough, durable hunter who's been chasing gazelle across the scorching sands of the Sahara for more than a thousand years.

Grooming Tips

The Azawakh's short, fine coat requires minimal upkeep. A weekly once-over with a soft bristle brush, a rubber grooming mitt or tool, or a hound glove is usually all that's needed to keep the coat in good condition. Azawakhs don't have a doggy odor, so frequent bathing isn't necessary. Even if the hound does find his way into a mud puddle, a bath may not be required'¿waiting for the mud to dry and then brushing it away may do the trick. As with all breeds, the Azawakh's nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails are painful and can impede the dog's gait.

 

Barbado da Terceira Breed

 

The Barbado da Terceira is a medium-sized herder that is a great companion and family dog. The breed is intelligent, easy to train, docile and willful, joyful, and sensitive. BDTs are athletic and need an experienced and loving owner.

Grooming Tips

The Barbado da Terceira should be bathed only on an ¿as-needed¿ basis.  If brushed well, they will not need to be bathed often as bathing strips the dog of valuable skin oils.  A bath every two months should therefore be adequate. Puppy hair needs to be brushed regularly. One must especially watch for tangles between the toes and clipped if found. Hair that grows too long over the eyes should also be trimmed. When the adult coat starts to grow, and the puppy hair falls out, loose hairs often get stuck in the new coat and can cause tangles, especially in the neck. These are difficult to remove, especially if the real coat   gets  longer. Hair should be brushed well down to the skin, working from the legs upwards. If this is too difficult, they should be shaved  to 1-1 ½   inches (7F clipper). Because the Barbado does not shed, hair should be trimmed when it gets too long. Trimming summer is not needed as the undercoat takes care of the heat. They need to be brushed at least weekly to ensure that hair is not matted and that twigs and burrs are removed. Their nails should be checked every few weeks and trimmed as needed. Many have back dew claws that need to be trimmed. Removal is not recommended. Ears should be checked once a week and cleaned as needed. Hair inside the ear may be removed with ear powder but should not be cut. Their teeth should be brushed regularly.

 

Barbet Breed

 

An archetypic water dog of France, the Barbet is a rustic breed of medium size and balanced proportions who appears in artwork as early as the 16th century. In profile, the Barbet is slightly rectangular with a substantial head and long, sweeping tail. He has a long, dense covering of curly hair and a distinctive beard. An agile athlete, the Barbet has been used primarily to locate, flush, and retrieve birds. He has a cheerful disposition and is very social and loyal. The defining characteristic of this rustic, medium-sized bird dog is the dense curly coat that covers him from the top of his large, broad head to the tip of his curving tail. The coat comes in shades of black, gray, brown, or fawn, sometimes with white markings. The breed's delightfully shaggy coat and amiable nature creates the impression of a Muppet come to life, but the Barbet is a strong, solidly-built dog bred for centuries to be a keen hunter and tireless swimmer. Barbets are very intelligent and learn new things quickly. They have a calm nature and are easy to live with as long as their exercise needs are being met.

Grooming Tips

Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your dog. The proper grooming of a Barbet starts with a full brush-out, a comb through to the skin, and a good bath. An after-bath blow drying will straighten the hair and make a fluff ball ready for a scissor trim. An all-over trim to approximately 3 to 5 inches in length to show the shape of the body is preferred, while the head, ears and tail remain longer. For the purpose of showing, the hair on the head must reach the muzzle. After the trim, the Barbet must be wet down and left to air-dry to regain his natural curls.     A Barbet's strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

 

Basenji Breed

 

The Basenji, Africa's 'Barkless Dog,' is a compact, sweet-faced hunter of intelligence and poise. They are unique and beguiling pets, best for owners who can meet their exercise needs and the challenge of training this catlike canine. Basenjis are small, graceful hounds standing 16 or 17 inches at the shoulder. They are recognizable by their glistening short coat, tightly curled tail, and wrinkled forehead and expressive almond-shaped eyes that convey a variety of subtle, humanlike emotions. Basenjis are a lovely sight at a standstill but more impressive yet at a fast trot, when they exhibit the long, smooth strides of a mini-racehorse. And yes, it's true, they don't bark, but they make their feelings known with an odd sound described as something between a chortle and a yodel. Basenjis are fastidious and will groom themselves like cats. This has been called a 'cult breed''¿small in numbers, but those lucky enough to own one do so with singular devotion.

Grooming Tips

Basenjis are fastidious creatures. Their short coat is a breeze to take care of, generally requiring no more than a quick once-over with a soft-bristle brush, a rubber grooming mitt or tool, or a hound glove every week. Brushing distributes skin oils throughout the coat to help keep it healthy and looking its best. Basenjis don't have a 'doggy' smell, and they usually don't need to be bathed unless they get into something particularly messy. As with all breeds, the Basenji'¿s nails should be trimmed regularly, because overly long nails can cause the dog pain as well as problems walking and running.

 

Basset Fauve de Bretagne Breed

 

Smart, courageous and determined, the Basset Fauve de Bretagne is a serious hunter, easily adaptable to different types of game and terrain. It is equally an excellent companion dog, being cheerful, intelligent and eager to please.

The Basset Fauve de Bretagne, also known as the Fawn Colored Brittany Basset, is a small, stocky, rough-coated hardy dog that is energetic and fast for its size. The Fauve gets along well with children and other pets. Training and socialization is a must or Fauves can get into mischief. Not nuisance barkers, you will, however, know if a rabbit runs through the yard, as they then give the hound 'voice' and chase. This breed is as happy romping in the field as he is curled up next to the family on the sofa.

Grooming Tips

The Basset Fauve de Betagne is almost a 'wash-and-wear' dog, with a coarse, wiry coat that repels dirt and resists matting. Some dogs have more coat than others. Longhaired dogs can be hand-stripped. All require grooming weekly with a fine-toothed comb, followed by a stiff brush. Shedding is seasonal. Nails should be trimmed regularly to avoid overgrowth and splitting. Teeth should be brushed and ears checked regularly.

 

Basset Hound Breed

 

Among the most appealing of the AKC breeds, the endearing and instantly recognizable Basset Hound is a perennial favorite of dog lovers all over the world. This low-slung and low-key hound can be sometimes stubborn, but is always charming. The Basset Hound stands no higher than 14 inches at the shoulder but, with his remarkably heavy bone, powerful little legs, and massive paws, he possesses big-dog strength and stamina. Bassets are famous for a large, domed head that features extremely long, velvety ears, mournful eyes, and a wrinkled brow, which give the breed the look of a sad clown. Built more for endurance than speed, the Basset moves in a deliberate but effortless manner. The breed's scenting ability is uncanny; it's said that among dogs only the Bloodhound's nose is more accurate. Mild and agreeable at home, the Basset is stubborn on the trail and barks in a loud, ringing voice. Although they may not be wildly demonstrative in their affections, they are steadfastly loyal.

Grooming Tips

Although it might seem that with his short, smooth hair the Basset Hound won't need any grooming, that's not quite the case. Regular grooming sessions are an important part of keeping the breed healthy and happy. The Basset's short hair can shed profusely. Shedding can be kept under control by gently going over the dog at least once a week with a soft brush or a shedding tool. As well as removing hair that is ready to shed, grooming is like an all-body massage that benefits his skin and overall health. The Basset will also need his nails trimmed regularly, and an occasional bath will help to keep his coat clean and shiny.

 

Bassetoodle (Basset Hound + Poodle) Breed

 

The Bassetoodle is a cross between the breeds the Basset Hound and the Poodle. These are dogs that are coming into the limelight for its wonderful looks and gentle, friendly disposition. They mostly look like a photoshopped version of its hound parent, but with the hair of the poodle. With their slightly longer torso, and legs that are shorter than the basset, they fall under the small dog group. These dogs have black, button eyes, a big triangular nose, hanging ears, all covered with hair.

Temperament and Behavior

With the inherited calmness of the basset hound, the bassetoodle thrive on human companionship and love their people. They would go around with their masters to get their affection. The bassetoodles are curious dogs and would follow anything that comes their way.

They would often get very nosey, enjoying sniffing your boxes, mail, purses, bags, dirty clothes, its bed or yours, and so on. Though they are affectionate, happy, and friendly in nature, they, at times, might display stubborn behavior. Being mischievous, their fondness might reach to such a level that they might, at times, jump onto people.

They also love kids, and would play with them and other pets in the family. These silly animals would be ideal for anyone who is in of a faithful companion. However, care must also be taken that your kids to not get over-enthusiastic and jump or sit on their backs. This might prove to be dangerous since they are dogs with a long back.

Grooming Tips

These dogs are average to heavy shedders, and you need to groom them frequently. Brushing them at least 2 to 3 times a week is recommended. You can even bathe them once every two weeks to ensure cleanliness, as also to retain the sheen of its coat.

A good brushing session would also resist the hair from matting. Trim them occasionally, including the regions around the anus and the eyes. Many owners love to keep the longer eyebrows and whiskers of their bassetoodle. Because many individuals love to be groomed, they won’t make much mess with the process.

 

Bavarian Mountain Scent Hound Breed

 

The Bavarian Mountain Scent Hound is calm and balanced, devoted to its owner, and reserved with strangers. He is a sound, self-assured, unafraid, biddable dog, neither shy nor aggressive.

Hailing from Germany, the Bavarian Mountain Scent Hound is the Bayerischer Gebirgsschweisshund in its native German. The breed's most notable trait is its outstanding "cold nose" tracking ability. His nose is so acute, he can distinguish between the injured game he is hunting and other animals of the same species. This somewhat lightweight, active, medium-sized breed is devoted to his owner, but can be reserved with strangers. He is not a kennel dog and prefers to be around his human family.

Grooming Tips

The Bavarian requires regular brushing. His coat is dense, close fitting and harsh, with little gloss, and is finer on the head and ears, and harsher and longer on the belly, legs and tail. The breed's strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

 

Beagle Breed

 

Not only is the Beagle an excellent hunting dog and loyal companion, it is also happy-go-lucky, funny, and'¿thanks to its pleading expression'¿cute. They were bred to hunt in packs, so they enjoy company and are generally easygoing. There are two Beagle varieties: those standing under 13 inches at the shoulder, and those between 13 and 15 inches. Both varieties are sturdy, solid, and 'big for their inches,' as dog folks say. They come in such pleasing colors as lemon, red and white, and tricolor. The Beagle's fortune is in his adorable face, with its big brown or hazel eyes set off by long, houndy ears set low on a broad head. A breed described as 'merry' by its fanciers, Beagles are loving and lovable, happy, and companionable'¿all qualities that make them excellent family dogs. No wonder that for years the Beagle has been the most popular hound dog among American pet owners. These are curious, clever, and energetic hounds who require plenty of playtime.

Grooming Tips

The Beagle has a smooth, dense double coat that gets heavier in the winter, so spring is shedding season. Beagles also shed moderately year-round. Weekly brushing with a medium-bristle brush, a rubber grooming mitt or tool, or a hound glove will remove the loose hair, and promotes new hair growth as well. Beagles don't need to be bathed too often, unless they happen to get into something particularly messy. As with all breeds, the Beagle's nails should be trimmed regularly, because overly long nails can cause the dog pain as well as problems walking and running.

 

Bearded Collie Breed

 

The Bearded Collie is a medium-sized herding breed from Scotland with a sturdy body, floppy ears, and bearded facial hair as part of its coarse, shaggy coat. Affectionately referred to as "Beardies," these Collies are highly energetic, intelligent working dogs that were originally bred to herd sheep in Scotland. Source
Typical of Bearded Collie:
Recognizable by their long, thick, shaggy coats that form a beard at the muzzle, Bearded Collies can come in a variety of colors. Because of their unique coats and the breed's intelligence, Bearded Collies make excellent show dogs. Source
Grooming Tips:
1. Start with the bristle brush, lifting the coat up and starting at the bottom and working through the coat in layers — this will ensure that the whole of the coat is reached. Brush in a coat-restorer or conditioner to ease the separation of the hair (use an untangle cream where necessary).
2. Work through the coat again, this time using a pin brush. At this point, any mats will become apparent and can be worked on first with the brushes, then progressing to the wooden wide-toothed comb.
3. A comb should only be used when the coat has been groomed with a brush first, otherwise any knots will pull a great deal and cause the dog discomfort. Do not bathe if the dog is matted — the coat must be tangle-free before you proceed.
4. Bathe the Bearded Collie in a protein pH-balanced shampoo, and use a quality conditioner.
5. Blow-dry the coat, brushing continually using a pin brush. Use a lanolin lubricant to enhance texture and to prevent breaking or matting. Some people use a straightening conditioner, which is brushed or combed in after the shampoo and rinse (it should be rinsed out well). However, this is not really needed, as a Beardie coat is allowed to be wavy for the show ring — it does not need to be dead straight.
6. The hair is parted along the spine by combing out the undercoat to leave it flat.
7. Check the dog’s nails, ears and teeth.
8. In pet dogs, scissor the hair beneath the dog’s feet and also under the tail (around the anus area) to prevent it becoming soiled with feces.
9. Thinning scissors, or a de-matting thinner tool, can be used on an excessively profuse coat, taking care not to remove too much coat at a time.

 

Beauceron Breed

 

The Beauceron is imposing and powerful, but also remarkably smart, spirited, and a versatile herder. Imagine a Border Collie's brain in a 100-pound body. They are especially beloved by women as a dashing but sensitive companion and protector.

Beaucerons are muscular, rugged, and large, standing as high as 27.5 inches at the shoulder, and yet graceful and in all ways balanced. Their dark black coats feature handsome squirrel-red accents, including the red feet that give the breed its French nickname Bas-Rouge ('red stockings'). They're also seen in a black-gray-tan coat. The long head is well chiseled, and the dark brown eyes project expression breed fanciers describe as frank and confident. They're not for novice owners, who might end up being owned by their dominant dog instead of the other way around. That said, well-trained and socialized Beaucerons are levelheaded watchdogs and guardians, especially good with the young, the small, and the defenseless.

Grooming Tips

The Beauceron has a short, dense double coat; the soft undercoat is covered by a rough, waterproof outer coat. It doesn't require a lot of grooming, but it does shed. A lot. And even more so twice a year during shedding season. Weekly brushing, daily during shedding season, with a medium-bristle brush, a rubber grooming mitt or tool, or a hound glove will remove the dead hair before it can fall onto the furniture, and it promotes new hair growth as well. As with all breeds, the Beauceron's nails should be trimmed regularly, because overly long nails can cause the dog pain as well as problems walking and running. Don't forget to trim the double dewclaws on the rear legs.

 

Bedlington Terrier Breed

 

Graceful terriers in sheep's clothing, Bedlington Terriers, named for the English mining shire where they were first bred, are genial housemates, alert watchdogs, versatile athletes, and irresistibly cuddly TV-time companions.

Bedlingtons are lithe, energetic Englishmen. The crisp, curly coat; arched back; tasseled ears; scimitar-shaped tail; and fleecy, pear-shaped head are identifying features of this one-of-a-kind breed. As the curvy contours indicate, there's sighthound¿Whippet, most likely¿in their family tree. Bedlingtons move with a light, springy step and when roused to pursuit can run like the wind. Rollicking, charming, and full of fun, Bedlingtons want most to be their family's center of attention and are known to be protective of loved ones. For an active family looking for a no-shedding, lively, and loyal companion, the search might end here.

Grooming Tips

The crisp, curly coat of the Bedlington Terrier is a mix of soft and harsh, but not wiry, hair. While fastidious owners will be happy to learn that it virtually does not shed at all, it grows very quickly and needs to be clipped every two months. Many owners learn the process, which involves both electric clippers and scissors, while others are happy to take their Bedlington to a groomer. In addition, a Bedlington needs to be brushed and/or combed once or twice a week. As with all breeds, the Bedlington's nails should be trimmed regularly, because overly long nails can cause the dog pain as well as problems walking and running.

 

Belgian Laekenois Breed

 

Strong, agile and full of life, the Belgian Laekenois (pronounced "Lak-in-wah") is one of four native dogs of Belgium. Although similar in body and temperament to the Malinois, Shepherd and Tervuren, the Laekenois differs in coat color, texture and length, as well as region of origin.

Of the four closely related Belgian herders, the Belgian Sheepdog, Malinois, Tervuren, and Laekenois, the Laekenois is the rarest. This strong and sturdy dog is distinguished from his brethren by a rough, tousled coat that comes in shades of red or fawn or in grayish tones. The blackening around the muzzle points up the expression of keen watchfulness shining from the dark almond-shaped eyes. The Belgian Laekenois is protective of his master and property. Although observant with strangers, the breed is affectionate and friendly with those he knows well. The Laekenois coat requires regular brushing and occasional bathing, and as a working dog, it needs daily exercise.

Grooming Tips

Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep your Belgian Laekenois clean and looking his best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your dog. The Laekenois' strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

 

Belgian Malinois Breed

 

The smart, confident, and versatile Belgian Malinois is a world-class worker who forges an unbreakable bond with his human partner. To deny a Mal activity and the pleasure of your company is to deprive him of his very reasons for being. Belgian Malinois are squarely built, proud, and alert herders standing 22 to 26 inches. Strong and well-muscled, but more elegant than bulky, there's an honest, no-frills look about them, as befit dogs built to work hard for their feed. A breed hallmark is the proud carriage of the head. Coat colors range from a rich fawn to mahogany. The black ears and mask accentuate bright, questioning eyes the color of dark Belgian chocolate. If you have ever seen a Mal perform an obedience routine, you know firsthand what a smart and eager breed this is. Problems set in, though, when this people-oriented dog is underemployed and neglected. Exercise, and plenty of it, preferably side by side with their adored owner, is key to Mal happiness.

Grooming Tips:

The short, waterproof coat of the Malinois is quite easy to take care of. Occasional brushing with a medium-bristle brush, a rubber grooming mitt or tool, or a hound glove will keep the dog looking his best, and promotes new hair growth and distributes skin oils throughout the coat as well. Malinois do shed twice a year; during these periods, a daily once-over with a slicker brush will help to remove the loose hair. As with all breeds, the nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can cause the dog pain as well as problems walking and running.Source

 

Belgian Sheepdog Breed

 

The Belgian Sheepdog is a highly trainable herder whose versatility and intelligence is the stuff of canine legend. This is a breed built for hard work, and plenty of it. These sensitive souls crave human companionship and abhor neglect. The stirring silhouette of a Belgian Sheepdog conveys both elegance and muscular determination. A handsome feature of the breed is the exceedingly proud carriage of the head and neck. A male might stand 26 inches at the shoulder; females are smaller. The dark eyes sparkle with a questioning intelligence, and the black coat is abundant, from the neck's 'collarette' to the 'breeches' of the hindquarters. In all ways, Belgian Sheepdogs are bright-eyed and bushy-tailed. In any sport or activity, a Belgian will always give 100 percent. In turn, owners tend to form a special bond with their eager workaholics. As one devotee puts it, Belgians 'inspire such intense loyalty because they themselves live and love with such great passion.'

Grooming Tips

The Belgian Sheepdog's double-layer coat, consisting of a dense undercoat and a harder outer coat, is quite easy to take care of '¿ as long as it's not shedding season. For most of the year, all a Belgian requires is a weekly brushing. Baths can be infrequent unless the dog gets into something messy. At least once a year, though, Belgians shed heavily. When this happens, a thorough brushing every day is required to remove the surprisingly large amount of dead hair. As with all breeds, the Belgian's nails should be trimmed regularly.

 

Belgian Tervuren Breed

 

The elegant, agile Belgian Tervuren is a bright and self-assured herding dog of medium size, known to be affectionate and possessive with loved ones. Lots of hard work and challenging play is heaven for this tireless, do-it-all dog. The Belgian Tervuren is characterized by a straight and abundant coat, an elegant but muscular frame, a proudly carried head, an alert and intelligent demeanor, and an insatiable work drive. The Terv's coat furnishings, like the sporty 'collarette' around the neck, are more profuse on males, who run larger than females. 'Their intelligence and high activity level can be a challenge for the less creative individual who may not understand the breed's need to work,' warns one longtime owner. But don't get the idea that Tervs are grim, mechanical worker drones. In fact, Tervs take real delight in their ability to master any task, and owners say a mischievous sense of humor is at work whenever Tervs outsmart their beloved human.

Grooming Tips

The Belgian Tervuren has a double-layer coat, with a dense, protective undercoat covered by a harsher outer coat. For most of the year, all that's required to groom him is a quick but thorough brushing once or twice a week with a pin brush and a slicker brush. During shedding season, however, which occurs at least once a year, these sessions expand to 15 or 20 minutes and may become a bit more frequent, and a rake is added to the toolkit to help remove all the dead hair. As with all breeds, the Terv's nails should be trimmed regularly.

 

Bergamasco Sheepdog Breed

 

The Bergamasco's coat is its most striking physical feature: three kinds of hair combine to form dense, flat, felt-like mats that continue to grow over the course of the dog's life, reaching the ground at approximately 5 years.

The coat is striking and unusual in appearance, but is actually a very efficient protection system for the dog: The mats protect from cold and wet - the Bergamasco can tolerate freezing cold without becoming uncomfortable- but it is also a thermo regulator, keeping the dogs cooler in the heat of summer and protecting them from sunbruns. Source

The Bergamasco could be described as an attentive, intelligent, patient, do-it-yourselfer. His heritage as a shepherding breed causes him to think and act for himself. He is an excellent companion and devoted to his family, especially children, but rest assured he has his own ideas on just about everything. He is a courageous guard, with a strong protective instinct, but is never aggressive. The Bergamasco is a good breed choice for a person who appreciates his self-sufficiency and ability to solve problems. Source

Grooming tips:

The Bergamasco’s coat is unusual in having three different types of hair in it (referred to as dog hair, goat hair, and wool) that weld together and felt into mats. After five or six years, the coat reaches the ground. Some of the hair acts like the visor on a baseball cap to protect his eyes from the sun, but he can see past it. That coat helps protect the Bergamasco against everything from wolf bites to mosquitoes. Most people with dog allergies do not react to the Bergamasco's coat, but some who are allergic to wool or lanolin do react.

The coat is much easier to care for than you'd think, but when wet it can take on the odor of a wet wool sweater (don’t say you weren’t warned!). The flocking doesn’t extend to the skin, so it doesn’t cause skin irritation.

Caring for the Bergamasco’s coat is not necessarily difficult, but it does call for some specific approaches. Ask the breeder to show you how to care for the coat. Trim the hair around the mouth and clean the dog’s face after meals to help reduce the odor.

A common misconception is that the coat should not be brushed, but once the coat is formed, nothing will change it. Brushing is necessary to remove dirt.

The Bergamasco can have as many baths as other dogs, but shampoo is not recommended because it dissolves natural oils in the coat.

The rest is basic care. Trim the nails as needed, usually every few weeks. Keep the ears clean and dry to prevent bacterial and yeast infections. Brush the teeth frequently with a vet-approved pet toothpaste for overall health and fresh breath. Source

 

Berger Picard Breed

 

The Berger Picard is a lanky herding dog of strong bone and sturdy build. Picards spent centuries as take-charge independent problem-solvers, so early socialization and positive training are necessary to cope with their stubborn streak. You can spot a Berger Picard a mile away thanks to his erect ears standing 4 to 5 inches high, a wavy fawn or brindle coat, and a strong tail that tapers to a distinctive J-hook. Males stand as high as 26 inches, and females as low as 21 inches. The eyes are dark and glistening, and the rectangular head is furnished with shaggy eyebrows, beard, and mustache'¿ the very image of a sagacious and worldly Frenchman. The Berger Picard is an ideal companion for athletic owners. Their rugged constitution, agility, and boundless energy make them eager partners in all kinds of sports, games, and outdoor pastimes. Exercise is a must; prolonged idleness and neglect will likely lead these sensitive, super-smart dogs to destructive behavior.

Grooming Tips

The Berger Picard's double coat consists of a soft, dense undercoat for insulation covered by a shaggy, wiry, waterproof topcoat. During shedding season, brushing every day or two with a rake and a slicker brush will remove the dead hair before it ends up on the floor and furniture. The rest of the year, a Picard only needs to be brushed once a month. The breed should be bathed only occasionally, and shampoos formulated for crisp coats are recommended. As with all breeds, the Picard's nails should be trimmed regularly.

 

Bernedoodle (Bernese Mountain Dog + Poodle) Breed

 

Bernedoodle is a mixed hybrid dog between the Bernese Mountain Dog and Poodle. Also known as the Bernese Mountain Poo, this dog is an amazingly loyal, clever, slightly goofy and gentle designer dog breed that inherits among the best traits from his purebred parents. Although it's a relatively new breed, its popularity is growing very fast attributed to its ability to be a great companion to families and owners. The Bernedoodle is also considered one of the cutest dogs among then designer breeds.

Being similar to the more popular and older hybrid doodle breeds, this designer breed appeared first in 2003-2004. But like a puppy, the Bernedoodle is likely to be a little bit more mischievous. You can easily curb this by ensuring you train and socialize your pup early on. By doing this, you will absolutely have one of the merriest and gentlest companion.

Bernedoodles easily adapt to new homes and families. These dogs have high energy bursts and in order for them to stay healthy and happy, they will need at least one walk each day. Bernedoodles are generally healthy compared to other designer dogs and they are also low shedders. Bred to be perfect companion dogs, Bernedoodles are affectionate, brilliant and one of the best family friends to have around.

Grooming Tips

Since Bernedoodles are created from two different breeds, their coats can vary in texture and length a great deal. Berne Doodles can have curly coats like the Poodles' parent or they can have a long straight and wavy coat like that of the Bernese Mountain Dog parent.

Bernedoodles are considered to be low shedding dogs that they inherit from the Poodle parent. However, Bernese Mountain Dog and Poodle mix dogs are not completely hypoallergenic since they still shed pet dander which actually happens with all other low shedding breeds.

Although Bernedoodles are a low shedding breed, they still require regular grooming. Owners can brush their Bernedoodles once or twice a week to ensure that the coat still remains healthy and beautiful.

Owners should wait until their puppies are seven months of age before clipping their coats' failure to which, irreversible damage may occur to its further growth. Although Bernedoodles don't require any standard clipping, owners still choose to clip them regularly to attain cute teddy bear-like dogs.

Bernedoodles come in different colors ranging from black, tri-colored, black and white, brown and black with different markings as well. Normally, they are highly recognized due to their shaggy look. Luckily, most Bernedoodles enjoy being groomed regularly since they view it as a way to further bond with their favorite humans.

 

Bernese Mountain Dog Breed

 

Big, powerful, and built for hard work, the Bernese Mountain Dog is also strikingly beautiful and blessed with a sweet, affectionate nature. Berners are generally placid but are always up for a romp with the owner, whom they live to please. The Bernese Mountain Dog is a large, sturdy worker who can stand over 27 inches at the shoulder. The thick, silky, and moderately long coat is tricolored: jet black, clear white, and rust. The distinctive markings on the coat and face are breed hallmarks and, combined with the intelligent gleam in the dark eyes, add to the Berner's aura of majestic nobility. A hardy dog who thrives in cold weather, the Berner's brain and brawn helped him multitask on the farms and pastures of Switzerland. Berners get along with the entire family and are particularly gentle with children, but they will often become more attached to one lucky human. Berners are imposing but not threatening, and they maintain an aloof dignity with strangers.

Grooming Tips

The Bernese Mountain Dog has a double coat, with a longer outer coat and a wooly undercoat. Berners shed a fair amount, even more so during shedding season, which occurs twice a year. Weekly brushing'¿daily during shedding season'¿will help to remove loose hair and keep the dog looking his best. Any tangles can be worked out with a slicker brush or metal comb. As with all breeds, the nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can cause the dog pain and structural problems.

 

Bichon Frise Breed

 

The small but sturdy and resilient Bichon Frise stands among the world's great 'personality dogs.' Since antiquity, these irresistible canine comedians have relied on charm, beauty, and intelligence to weather history's ups and downs. A good-size Bichon will stand a shade under a foot tall at the shoulder. The breed's glory is a white hypoallergenic coat, plush and velvety to the touch, featuring rounded head hair that sets off the large, dark eyes and black leathers of the nose and lips. Bichons are adaptable companions who get on well with other dogs and children. Alert and curious, Bichons make nice little watchdogs'¿but they are lovers, not fighters, and operate under the assumption that there are no strangers, just friends they haven't met yet. Their confidence and size make them ideal city dogs. Bichons train nicely and enjoy performing for their loved ones. Finally, there's the happy-go-lucky Bichon personality that draws smiles and hugs wherever they go.

Grooming Tips

Bichons should be brushed at least two or three times a week, but every day is best. They need a bath and a clipping at least once a month. Owners who show their Bichons learn to do this, but most pet owners take their Bichon to the groomer every four to six weeks. The Bichon is considered to be relatively hypoallergenic, as the breed sheds very little because the shed hair is caught up in the undercoat. That shed hair has to be brushed out to prevent mats from forming. As with all breeds, the Bichon's nails should be trimmed regularly as well.

 

Biewer Terrier Breed

 

The Biewer Terrier is an elegant, longhaired, tri-colored toy terrier whose only purpose in life is to love and be loved. They maintain a charming, whimsical attitude well into adulthood. Carrying around a toy or two is not surprising.
The Biewer Terrier is a very dedicated, loyal family member and friendly with strangers. A large percentage of the Biewer Terriers are happy-go-lucky dogs, smiling when asked if they are happy. In spite of its small stature, the Biewer is a very hearty, athletic dog and an excellent hunter of vermin. They are lighthearted, have a childlike attitude and like to carry toys in their mouths. He is quick to alert you to company, but is not a constant barker. Source
Nutrition:
The Biewer Terrier may have a sensitive GI system and should be fed a low-protein, well-balanced diet. Kibble is recommended as canned food increases plaque build-up. If you notice your dog chewing on his feet and scratching a lot, change his food to a lamb or fish base. For the most part, you can free feed your Biewer, but if you notice weight gain, pick up that food and feed them 2 to 3 times per day. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times. Source
Grooming Tips:

1. Bathing: This is a breed that requires frequent bathing and daily brushing. If your dog gets dirty then bathing once a week will help keep them nice and clean. The exception is the underside of the body where urine collects on a male. Wash this area daily with a damp cloth, a drop of shampoo or conditioner, and warm water.
2. Shampoo: There are a number of really good dog/puppy shampoos on the market from which to choose. Remember to be careful around the eyes. Use a tearless shampoo for the head and around the eyes so you don't have to worry about getting soap in them.
3. Tangles: Wetting tangles with warm water, a little conditioner and working them out with your fingers as you bathe the dog should help. You may also use this method with a metal comb as you work out the tangle carefully. Sometimes, a bit of hair oil also helps.
4. Brush: A good pin brush with rubber back is an excellent grooming aid also because the pins are longer to reach through the coat. Do not use a brush with small balls on the end of the pins as these tend to pull the coat and break it.
5. Comb: A good metal comb with long teeth is the best. They can be a bit expensive but you won't find any rough spots to tear your dog's coat. Remember to ALWAYS finish your grooming by combing through the coat.
6. Fine Toothed Flea Comb: These are the best to use under the eyes to remove any "eye mucous" which accumulates in a very short time. Keep your doggy's under-eye area clean at all times. You can use a damp washcloth or cotton ball to soften and remove any "eye mucous" then comb through with a flea comb. Dry carefully. Source

 

Black and Tan Coonhound Breed

 

Large, athletic hunters who work nights, Black and Tan Coonhounds are friendly, easygoing hounds who love company. They are snoozy by the fireside but tenacious when on the trail of the wily raccoon. The Black and Tan Coonhound is a real American original.

Black and Tans have an amazingly sensitive nose, long, velvety ears, and a sweet disposition. The coal-black coat features rich tan accents, including the distinctive 'pumpkin seeds' above keenly expressive eyes. These are big, strong hounds: A good-size male can stand 27 inches at the shoulder and cover ground with effortless, eager strides.  Black and Tan Coonhounds are sociable hounds. A lonely Black and Tan Coonhound will serenade the neighborhood with loud, mournful 'music.' Black and Tan Coonhounds can keep pace with the most active family, but they also can hog the sofa for hours on end. Hounds will be hounds: A passing squirrel can arouse Black and Tan Coonhound prey drive in no time flat, so a strong leash and sturdy fence are must-haves. Black and Tan Coonhounds might be too much hound for the lifestyle of every owner.

Grooming Tips

The Black and Tan Coonhound has a short, dense coat that is shed once or twice a year. Weekly brushing with a medium-bristle brush, a rubber grooming mitt or tool, or a hound glove will remove the dead hair before it can fall onto the furniture. Grooming also promotes new hair growth and distributes skin oils throughout the coat to keep it healthy. Black and Tans should be bathed occasionally to keep them from developing a doggy odor. As with all breeds, the Black and Tan's nails should be trimmed regularly, because overly long nails can cause the dog pain as well as problems walking and running.

 

Black Russian Terrier Breed

 

The Black Russian Terrier is a large, immensely powerful worker of heavy bone and coarse all-black coat. BRTs are known for their courage, confidence, and intelligence. Bred to guard and protect, they are naturally aloof with strangers. What's the word we're looking for? Imposing? Massive? Majestic? How about just plain 'big.' This brawny guard dog of the Siberian steppes can tip the scales at 140 pounds and stand as high as 30 inches at the shoulder. They're much taller when the huge, brick-shaped head is considered. The tousled, all-black coat is warm enough to allow BRTs to patrol some of the coldest habitable places on earth. The old expression 'He moves well for a big guy' applies to this nimble-footed giant.

Grooming Tips

The Black Russian Terrier's tousled double coat'¿a thick, soft undercoat covered by a coarse, protective outer coat'¿needs regular maintenance to prevent mats from forming, with a thorough brushing once or twice a week. The owner will need to learn to scissor around the face, especially his beard and mustache, to keep him looking his best, or rely on a professional groomer to do the job. A trim with clippers every few months can be done by a groomer, but many owners learn how to do it themselves. As with all breeds, the BRT's nails should be trimmed regularly.

 

Bloodhound Breed

 

The world-famous 'Sleuth Hound' does one thing better than any creature on earth: find people who are lost or hiding. An off-duty Bloodhound is among the canine kingdom's most docile citizens, but he's relentless and stubborn on a scent.

Bloodhounds are large, substantial dogs standing 23 to 27 inches at the shoulder and weighing up to 110 pounds. Their most famous features are a long, wrinkled face with loose skin; huge, drooping ears; and warm, deep-set eyes that complete an expression of solemn dignity. Coat colors can be black and tan, liver and tan, or red. Powerful legs allow Bloodhounds to scent over miles of punishing terrain. As pack dogs, Bloodhounds enjoy company, including other dogs and kids. They are easygoing, but their nose can sometimes lead them into trouble. A strong leash and long walks in places where they can enjoy sniffing around are recommended. Bloodhounds are droolers, and obedience training these sensitive sleuths can be a challenge.

Grooming Tips:

The Bloodhound has a short, dense coat that is shed once or twice a year. Weekly brushing with a medium-bristle brush, a rubber grooming mitt or tool, or a hound glove will remove the dead hair before it can fall onto the furniture. Brushing also promotes new hair growth and distributes skin oils throughout the coat to keep it healthy. Bloodhounds should be bathed regularly to keep them from developing a doggy odor. As with all breeds, the Bloodhound's nails should be trimmed regularly.Source

 

Bluetick Coonhound Breed

 

The sleekly beautiful Bluetick Coonhound is a sweet and affectionate charmer who might enjoy snoozing in the shade, but in pursuit of quarry he is relentless, bold, and single-minded. His off-the-charts prey drive must be channeled. Blueticks are speedy and compact nocturnal hunters named for the mottled (or 'ticked') black-and-blue pattern of the glossy coat. A large male can top out at 27 inches and 80 pounds; females are smaller. Blueticks are well-muscled but sleek and racy, never chunky or clumsy. The baying, bawling, and chopping bark of Blueticks might be cacophonous to some, but to coon hunters it's the music of the night. The droopy-eared charm of Blueticks is irresistible. They crave affection and are deeply devoted to those who provide it. Blueticks have tremendous prey drive. Neglected, underemployed coonhounds with no outlet for their hardwired impulses can develop problem behaviors, like serenading the neighbors with loud, mournful 'music.'

Grooming Tips

The Bluetick Coonhound has a short, glossy coat that sheds only moderately. Weekly brushing with a medium-bristle brush, a rubber grooming mitt, or a hound glove will help to remove loose hairs and keep him looking his best. In general, Blueticks require only an occasional bath, unless they've gotten into something especially messy. As with all breeds, the Bluetick's nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can cause the dog pain as well as problems walking and running.

 

Boerboel Breed

 

Boerboels are intimidating but discerning guardians of home and family who learned their trade while protecting remote South African homesteads from ferocious predators. They are dominant and confident, also bright and eager to learn. There's a no-frills, no-nonsense quality to this sleek-coated avenger, who might stand as high as 27 inches at the shoulder and weigh as much as you do. A broad and blocky head, powerful jaws, and thick muscles from neck to rump mark it as a descendant of the ancient 'molloser' dog family, the foundation of today's mastiff-type breeds. In motion, the Boerboel just might be the most agile of all mastiff types.   The imposing Boerboel is devoted to protecting the people and places he loves. Training and socialization should begin early, before a pup becomes a dominant adult. This is a trainable, versatile breed, eager to spend time with their adored humans. Still, a Boerboel might be way too much dog for the novice owner to handle.

Grooming Tips:

The Boerboel has a short, dense coat that sheds a moderate amount. Weekly brushing with a soft-bristle brush, a rubber grooming mitt, or a hound glove will help to remove any loose hair and keep the dog looking his best. A good brushing also promotes new hair growth and distributes skin oils throughout the coat to help keep it healthy. Boerboels need a bath only occasionally. As with all breeds, the Boerboel's nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can cause the dog pain as well as problems walking and running.Source

 

Bohemian Shepherd Breed

 

The Bohemian Shepherd is an intelligent, lively, quick, athletic breed which enthusiastically welcomes most any activity introduced, making the breed rather versatile.

They succeed in many arenas such as agility, dog dancing, schutzhund, search and rescue, nose work, tracking, pastoral work, obedience, therapy dogs, service dogs, and are now breaking into the fields of coursing, dock diving and endurance tests. The Bohemian Shepherd makes an excellent family dog due to its devotion to family members and adoration of children. This is a breed which loves to be with its family and also does well with other non-human members of the family when raised with them.

Grooming Tips

Grooming with the Bohemian Shepherd is quite easy. They are seasonal shedders and require a brushing once a week with an occasional bath.

 

Bohemian Sheepdog Breed

 

The Bohemian Sheepdog is an intelligent, lively, quick, athletic breed which enthusiastically welcomes most any activity introduced, making the breed rather versatile.

They succeed in many arenas such as agility, dog dancing, schutzhund, search and rescue, nose work, tracking, pastoral work, obedience, therapy dogs, service dogs, and are now breaking into the fields of coursing, dock diving and endurance tests. The Bohemian Shepherd makes an excellent family dog due to its devotion to family members and adoration of children. This is a breed which loves to be with its family and also does well with other non-human members of the family when raised with them.

Grooming Tips

Grooming with the Bohemian Sheepdog is quite easy. They are seasonal shedders and require a brushing once a week with an occasional bath.

 

Bolognese Breed

 

The Bolognese, a member of the Bichon family, is an enchanting small, white companion dog with a compact and sturdy, square body. The Bolognese is a rather serious dog and generally not high energy but is intelligent and witty.

A small companion breed originating in Italy, the Bolognese is a calm, faithful dog with a long, fluffy pure-white coat. They are very playful, easy-going and love people. The Bolognese is small, stocky, and squarely built. He is rather serene and inactive, and devoted to his master and his people. They can be shy towards strangers, but warm up quickly if they are properly socialized. Prone to separation anxiety, the Bolognese does not do well alone for long periods of time. They would be ill-suited for people with a 9-5 workday.

Grooming Tips

The Bolognese has an all-white coat that is soft and fluffy like the texture of cotton. He is also 'non-shedding,' so low to mild allergy sufferers should not be greatly affected. Bolognese coats are unshaped and untrimmed except for around their eyes for sanitary reasons. Regular grooming is needed if the Bolognese is kept in its full coat. For easier maintenance, many people are satisfied with keeping their Bolo in a shorter coat of about one inch, leaving the untrimmed 'mop head' around the face.     Beyond regular grooming, the occasional bath will keep your Bolognese clean and looking his best. Nails should be trimmed occasionally with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

 

Border Collie Breed

 

A remarkably bright workaholic, the Border Collie is an amazing dog'¿maybe a bit too amazing for owners without the time, energy, or means to keep it occupied. These energetic dogs will settle down for cuddle time when the workday is done. Borders are athletic, medium-sized herders standing 18 to 22 inches at the shoulder. The overall look is that of a muscular but nimble worker unspoiled by passing fads. Both the rough coat and the smooth coat come in a variety of colors and patterns. The almond eyes are the focus of an intelligent expression'¿an intense gaze, the Border's famous 'herding eye', is a breed hallmark. On the move, Borders are among the canine kingdom's most agile, balanced, and durable citizens. The intelligence, athleticism, and trainability of Borders have a perfect outlet in agility training. Having a job to perform, like agility'¿or herding or obedience work'¿is key to Border happiness. Amiable among friends, they may be reserved with strangers.

Grooming Tips

There are two types of coat in the breed. The rough coat is medium-length and feathered, while the smooth coat is shorter and coarser. Both are dense, weather-resistant double coats. Grooming is the same for both: going over the dog with a pin brush once or twice a week, more often if needed, to keep the coat free of mats, tangles, dirt, and debris. During shedding season, daily brushing is required. As with all breeds, the BC's nails should be trimmed regularly.

 

Border Terrier Breed

 

Admirers of the upbeat and agile Border Terrier cherish their breed's reputation as a tough, no-frills working terrier. These plucky, happy, and affectionate dogs are popular pets in town and country. The wiry coat is an easy keeper. Border Terriers, standing from 11 to 16 inches at the shoulder, are easy to recognize among other small terriers by their unique head shape'¿the breed has an 'otter head,' as fanciers say. Another distinguishing trait is that they are longer in leg than other small terriers. The wire coat can be grizzle and tan, blue and tan, wheaten, or red. Borders are described as 'hard as nails' when working, but at home they're good-tempered, affectionate, and trainable. Borders love exploring outdoors and make fine childhood playmates. Bred to be country dogs, Borders adapt well to city life'¿as long as they get plenty of exercise. Borders tend to get along with other dogs, but their hunting instincts can be aroused when cats or squirrels cross their path.

Grooming Tips

The Border Terrier has a double coat: a hard, wiry outer coat over a soft, fluffy undercoat. Like most double-coated breeds, the Border sheds seasonally. Most of the time, a quick brushing every week or two is enough to keep the coat in good shape. During shedding season, owners can expect to spend a half-hour or so every day stripping out the dead hair, either with their hands or with a rake or stripping tool. The outer coat repels dirt, but bathing compromises this ability. Usually a dirty Border Terrier can be cleaned up with a towel and a brush. As with all breeds, the BT's nails should be trimmed regularly.

 

Bordoodle (Border Collie + Poodle) Breed

 

Bordoodle is a new designer dog created from cross-breeding two purebred dogs the Poodle and the Border Collie. Intelligent, affectionate, playful and friendly these dogs have inherited the best character traits from both their parents.

Bordoodles can sometimes be referred to as the Borpoo, Boderpoo, Borderdoodle or the Border Poodle. They make excellent family dogs as they are friendly, lovely and like companionship, at times they can be very protective of their families. These canines are also very tolerant of people ranging from very young to very old. Since the Bordoodle is a very intelligent dog, owners are advised to start training them as puppies from a very tender age. If proper socialization and behavioral training classes are not started early, the dog may exhibit stubborn traits, which eventually will result in destruction. Training will give you an ultimate and well-behaved family dog.

Bordoodle Size

Bordoodles are a medium-sized breed. Full-grown Bordoodles weigh between 30 to 60 pounds and have a height of about 15 to 22 inches. Their size makes them easy to transport and handle, they are also known for their capability in sports.

Bordoodle Temperament

The Bordoodle exhibits the best character traits of its parents, the Poodle and the Border Collie which are both great canine breeds. The Border Collie adds work ethic, focus, attention span, and control in order to balance out the praise driven and the bubbly Poodle. On the other hand, the Poodle dulls down the energy level, shedding coat, herding instinct of the Border Collie and adds its own traits such as friendliness, food motivation, non-shedding coat and a joyful personality. These pups are highly sociable, friendly and will rarely display any aggression.

Bordoodles are highly intelligent, protective and loyal. They will safely guard their family and be wary of strangers until they are sure that they are trustworthy and safe. They get along well with children who know how to handle animals and will also make perfect playmates. Bordoodles also enjoy participating in the family's daily activities and routines. They have a generally quite reserved temperament. If they are not well trained, they will develop a sense of entitlement which will cause them to be disobedient in their adult life. Their personality is warm and loving and will always enjoy playing outside with family members and protecting them as well. Be aware that they take well to training due to their intelligence and enjoy tasks that stimulate their mind. If the dog is not well trained it will result in destructive behaviors, also avoid leaving him alone for long sessions. Their nature is to please their owners, disappointing them is not something they take pleasure in. While training them you will realize that they pick a trick twice as fast as the other dogs, thus you will not have to ply them in every step with either treats or rewards.

Grooming Tips

Bordoodles have a range of coat patterns and colors, normally they incorporate a mix of white, black, brown and grey. The coat is between medium and long when it comes to length and mostly described as soft to the touch and wavy. In most cases you will spot Bordoodles with dark grey and white coat, this is because they inherit it from the Border Collie parent. However, if the dog inherits more genes from the Poodle parent you will spot them with the brindle or golden coats.

Bordoodles don't shed much and so brushing them once or twice a week should be okay to keep the coat soft and smooth. It will also be necessary to bathe the Bordoodle once he gets dirty.Grooming the Bordoodles fur can be a bit challenging due to its long and thick wavy texture. Use a brush that is meant for thicker hair and it will be easier to brush it while wet. This should be fun since Bordoodles love getting wet and will not mind being sprayed by a hose.

Bordoodles adapt easily to climate but when it gets cold to make sure to provide a suitable dog coat. During hot seasons Bordoodles will enjoy being under a shade and other water activities.

Although Border Collies are not hypoallergenic the Poodles are, which means that the Bordoodles will shed a coat that can be hypoallergenic.

 

Borzoi Breed

 

Among the most impressively beautiful of all dogs, the aristocratic Borzoi is cherished for his calm, agreeable temperament. In full stride, he is a princely package of strength, grace, and glamour flying by at 35 to 40 miles per hour. Borzoi are large, elegant sighthounds. A mature male stands at least 28 inches at the shoulder and weighs 75 to 105 pounds. Females will be smaller. Beneath the luxurious silky coat, Borzoi construction follows the ancient Greyhound template. One known as the Russian Wolfhound, Borzoi were bred to be swift and tough enough to pursue and pin their ferocious lupine quarry. In their quiet, catlike way they can be stubborn, and training is best accomplished with patience, consistency, and good humor. Affectionate family dogs, Borzoi are nonetheless a bit too dignified to wholeheartedly enjoy a lot of roughhousing. The sight of a cat or squirrel on the run will quickly stir their pursuit instinct, and fenced-in running room is a must.

Grooming Tips

Like any long-coated dog, the Borzoi will shed a bit. In general, a quick brushing every day or two with a pin brush, slicker brush, and/or a comb will remove any loose hair and dirt from the coat. About once a year the Borzoi will shed more heavily for several weeks, and during this shedding season more frequent grooming is needed. Regular baths keep the Borzoi clean and looking his best. As with all breeds, the Borzoi's nails should be trimmed regularly.

 

Bossi Poo (Boston Terrier + Poodle) Breed

 

The Bossi-Poo is a wonderful hybrid breed that was made by crossing a Boston Terrier with a Poodle. These two breeds are very intelligent and loyal, which makes the Bossi-Poo a highly trainable, well-mannered and affectionate companion pet. They will be fairly low maintenance dogs, but it depends on the type of coat that the dog adopts. If their fur is more like that of a Poodle compared to the Boston Terrier, it is possible that these dogs can be hypoallergenic, however, it is not guaranteed. Although they can easily adapt to any sized house and all environments, unless it is too cold, these dogs will absolutely need between 30 and 60 minutes of exercise every day.

Grooming Tips

The Bossi Poo is a low-maintenance pooch when it comes to his grooming needs. However, if your Bossi Poo inherits the Poodle’s thick, curly coat, you will need to brush him once a week. Other than that, clip his nails and clean his ears as needed.

 

Boston Terrier Breed

 

The Boston Terrier is a lively little companion recognized by his tight tuxedo jacket, sporty but compact body, and the friendly glow in his big, round eyes. His impeccable manners have earned him the nickname 'The American Gentleman.' Boston Terriers are compact, short-tailed, well-balanced little dogs weighing no more than 25 pounds. The stylish 'tuxedo' coat can be white and either black, brindle, or seal (dark brown). The head is square, the muzzle is short, and the large, round eyes can shine with kindness, curiosity, or mischief. Ever alert to their surroundings, Bostons move with a jaunty, rhythmic step. It's a safe bet that a breed named for a city'¿the Havanese or Brussels Griffon, for instance'¿will make an excellent urban pet. Bostons are no exception: they are sturdy but portable, people-oriented, and always up for a brisk walk to the park or outdoor cafe. A bright dog with a natural gift for comedy, the dapper Bostonian is a steady source of smiles.

Grooming Tips:

The Boston's sleek, fine coat does shed somewhat, though not a lot. Weekly brushing with a soft-bristle brush, a rubber grooming mitt or tool, or a hound glove will help to remove the loose hair. A good brushing also promotes new hair growth and distributes skin oils throughout the coat to help keep it healthy. Bostons need to be bathed only occasionally, unless they get into something messy. As with all breeds, the Boston's nails should be trimmed regularly, because overly long nails can cause the dog pain as well as problems walking and running. Source

 

Bouvier des Flandres Breed

 

They don't build 'em like this anymore. Burly and barrel-chested, the tousle-coated dog of Flandres is from a time and place where a dog had to work like '¦ well, a dog. These smart and steady all-purpose workers make excellent watchdogs. Standing as high as 27.5 inches, with heavy bone and powerful muscles beneath a weatherproof coat, and an impressive head accented by beard and mustache, Bouviers can do anything that needs doing in a barnyard or pasture except milk the cows. And yet, Bouviers are more than just farm equipment. Their sterling character, huge heart, and keen intelligence endear them to dog lovers the world over. The Bouvier work ethic must be accommodated, and happily the breed's versatility allows them to do myriad tasks. Bouviers are excellent watchdogs and guardians, and eager participants in dog sports, especially herding trials. These strong-willed dogs do best with owners who can devote ample time and space to a top-of-the-line working dog.

Grooming Tips

The Bouvier's coat needs brushing once or twice a week. A good slicker brush or pin brush and large comb will work for this. The beard may need cleaning at the same time, and the dog's toenails should be trimmed every week or two.

 

Boxer Breed

 

Loyalty, affection, intelligence, work ethic, and good looks: Boxers are the whole doggy package. Bright and alert, sometimes silly, but always courageous, the Boxer has been among America's most popular dog breeds for a very long time. A well-made Boxer in peak condition is an awesome sight. A male can stand as high as 25 inches at the shoulder; females run smaller. Their muscles ripple beneath a short, tight-fitting coat. The dark brown eyes and wrinkled forehead give the face an alert, curious look. The coat can be fawn or brindle, with white markings. Boxers move like the athletes they are named for: smooth and graceful, with a powerful forward thrust. Boxers are upbeat and playful. Their patience and protective nature have earned them a reputation as a great dog with children. They take the jobs of watchdog and family guardian seriously and will meet threats fearlessly. Boxers do best when exposed to a lot of people and other animals in early puppyhood.

Grooming Tips:

The Boxer's short, shiny coat requires very little grooming. A good once-over with a rubber curry-brush or a hound glove once or twice a week should keep him looking his best. The Boxer tends to be a clean dog, needing a bath only occasionally. His nails should be trimmed at least once a month unless naturally worn down on a hard surface, and to prevent tartar buildup his teeth should be brushed often'¿daily if possible. Source

 

Boykin Spaniel Breed

 

A medium-sized flushing and retrieving dog known for its rich brown coat, the Boykin Spaniel is avid, eager, merry, and trainable. This mellow housedog and tenacious bird dog was once South Carolina's best-kept secret. Boykins are medium-sized spaniels, larger and rangier than Cockers but more compact than Springers. The breed's hallmark is a beautiful solid-brown coat. Colors range from a rich liver to a luscious chocolate. The large, feathery ears hang close to the cheeks, setting off an expression of soulful intelligence. Bred to work in the lakes and swamps of their native South Carolina, web-toed Boykins can swim like seals. For years, Boykins were known only to hunters of Carolina waterfowl and wild turkey. But lately, the wider world has discovered that the Boykin is as delightful at home as he is eager at the lake. 'They are very, very sweet dogs to have around the family,' a longtime owner says, 'but an absolute tiger in the field.'

Grooming Tips

The Boykin's medium-length, wavy coat requires only minimal maintenance. A weekly brushing will help to remove dirt and loose hair and keep him looking his best, and an occasional bath will help to keep him clean-smelling. As with all breeds, the nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can cause discomfort and problems walking and running.

 

Bracco Italiano Breed

 

The Bracco Italiano is one of the oldest of the pointing breeds. It was introduced into the United States in the 1990s and has remained true to its heritage as a versatile gun dog. It is gentle in the home and tireless in the field.

Tough and adapted to all types of hunting, the Bracco Italiano is reliable, intelligent, docile and easy to train. He has a powerful appearance, with lean limbs, well-developed muscles and a sculpted head. In English, he is the Italian Pointing Dog.

 

Grooming Tips:

Bracchi Italiani are easy to groom. Their short coats require minimal care and their long ears require routine cleaning to minimize the risk of ear infections. Beyond that, the occasional bath will keep them clean and looking their best. Their nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Teeth should be brushed regularly Source

 

Braque du Bourbonnais Breed

 

Pronounced brock-do-bor-bon-NAY, this pointer has a calm, gentle demeanor that is ideally suited for the foot hunter. The breed's relatively small size and short coat well suits them as an ideal home companion for the family that hunts. The Bourbonnais is an ancient breed that evolved in France during the 15th century in the historic province of Bourbonnais. By the 1800s, the breed was known amongst French hunters as a tailless pointer with distinctive fawn and liver ticking. The Braque du Bourbonnais has now gained a strong foothold in North America; some years there are more pups registered in the United States than its homeland of France. In English, he is the Bourbonnais Pointing Dog. He is kind and affectionate in the home and a serious, adaptable, intelligent hunter in the field.  

Grooming Tips:

The Braque du Bourbonnais has a fine, dense, short coat. It is a little coarser, and sometimes longer, on the back. On the head and ears, the hair is finer and shorter. Beyond periodic brushing, the occasional bath will keep your Braque du Bourbonnais clean and looking his best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your dog. The breed's strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly. Source

 

Braque Francais Pyrenean Breed

 

The Braque Francais Pyrenean is a rustic breed and hails from France. In English, he is the French Pointing Dog Pyrenean Type.

The Braque Francais Pyrenean is a well-proportioned, medium-sized dog with a soft, shorthaired coat. He was bred to hunt the very rugged and arid Pyrenees Mountain range on the border of France and Spain. The breed dates back hundreds of years and is considered the common ancestor to all of today's shorthaired pointing breeds. There are actually two types of Braque Francais: the Gascony Type and the Pyrenean type. The Braque Francais Pyrenean is the smaller and more popular of the two. He has a natural retrieve instinct and loves water. He is gentle, friendly sociable, and submissive.

Grooming Tips:

Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep the Braque Francais Pyrenean clean and looking his best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your dog. The breed's strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly. Source

 

Briard Breed

 

The Briard packs so much loyalty, love, and spirit into its ample frame that it's often described as a "heart wrapped in fur." The dashing good looks of these muscular Frenchmen radiate a distinct aura of Gallic romance and elegance. Briards are herders known for a wavy coat of either gray, tawny, or black, and an impressive head topped by a peek-a-boo hairdo parted naturally in the middle. A luxurious beard and eyebrows accentuate an expression described as 'frank and questioning.' Standing between 22 and 27 inches at the shoulder, Briards are burly and rugged but move with a nimble-footed gait. They possess traits common to many other herders: trainability, brains, a protective eye toward family (especially kids, whom they regard as their flock), and wariness with outsiders. These are large, tireless dogs'¿it is said that just two or three Briards can handle 700 head of sheep'¿and novice owners might be overwhelmed by their work drive and zest for life.

Grooming Tips

Begin grooming your Briard puppy long before he really needs grooming. Make sure that you make grooming time a happy period he will look forward to in the years when grooming is a necessity and can take a long time. A Briard should be brushed several times a week, completely to the skin, using a good-quality pin brush. Using an undercoat rake can help eliminate a lot of dead hair and lessen shedding. The number of baths a Briard will need depends entirely on his lifestyle and the jobs he is doing. Frequency may range from weekly to monthly, to even less.

 

Brittany Breed

 

Sportsmen on both sides of the Atlantic cherish the agile, energetic Brittany as a stylish and versatile gundog. Bright and eager at home, and tireless afield, Brittanys require a lot of exercises, preferably with their favorite humans. Brittanys are smaller than setters but leggier than spaniels, standing about 20 inches at the shoulder. Their beautiful, boldly patterned coat comes in combinations of white and vivid orange and liver (reddish-brown). They are rugged and strong but smooth, clean, and quick afoot. The face has the 'softness' prized by bird-dog lovers; high-set ears convey the breed's essential eagerness. The zeal and versatility that make Brittanys peerless hunters can be channeled into dog sports. Obedience, agility, flyball, dock diving'¿you name it, this trainable breed is up for it. The Brittany is a nice fit for those seeking an all-purpose hunting partner, a dog-sport teammate, or a companion in sync with an upbeat, outdoorsy family life.

Grooming Tips

The Brittany's flat or wavy coat is mostly fairly short and requires minimal grooming. A once-over with a soft brush or hound glove and a quick comb-through of his featherings should keep him looking his best. For the show ring there is some light trimming done to neaten the dog's head and neck. The underside of the ears should be inspected regularly and wiped clean if needed, and the nails trimmed every month if not naturally worn down.

 

Broholmer Breed

 

Calm, good-natured, yet watchful and confident, the Broholmer hails from Denmark and makes a great family companion. A large, mastiff-type dog, the Broholmer is rectangular and strongly built with a wide, massive head. Around the year 1800, a Danish dog book described him as a very ordinary breed, especially around Copenhagen. His nickname was "the butcher's dog," as he was often seen lying at the doorsteps of butcher shops. He was a protector of the home and a herder and guard dog of cattle at the farm and in the city's markets. Today, his size is the only thing that keeps intruders at bay. The Broholmer has a heart of gold, loves to snuggle, and always wants to be near you, though his preference is to sit on you. He is an excellent dog with children and other dogs, though because he seems to underestimate his size, supervision is recommended. This breed is also remarkably agile for his size and can do agility, fetch balls, and jump and catch frisbees. Anything you do, camping, hiking, picnicking, walks in the park, he will be more than happy to go along with you. 

Grooming Tips:

Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep your Broholmer clean and looking his best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your dog. Keep strong, fast-growing nails trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly. Source

 

Brussels Griffon Breed

 

Tipping the scales at no more than 12 pounds, this humanlike toy of complex character has enough personality for 10 ordinary dogs. A sensitive companion for discerning grownups, the Brussels Griffon is smart, devoted, and comically self-important.

With this breed, you get a big personality in a 5-to-15-pound package. One look into his big, human-like eyes, and you'll be smitten. Griffs come in four colors red, black-and-reddish-brown (called belge), black and tan, and black and in smooth coats (like a Pug) or rough coats (like a Schnauzer). Their black muzzle and whiskers earned them the nickname 'bearded dogs' in old folk songs. The Griff's big black eyes described as 'almost human' coupled with a fringed beard and mustache covering his short muzzle, gives him the air of a worldly, French-speaking philosopher. Griffs come in four colors: red, black-and-reddish-brown (called belge), black and tan, and black and in smooth coats or rough coats. The Griff's body is thickset and sturdy, and he moves with the purposeful trot of a fellow who knows what he wants.  Griffs are alert, sociable, and easily trained. Although playful and energetic, their small size and sensitive nature make them a poor choice as roughhousing playmates for kids. They have a low threshold for loneliness and will stick close to their special human, providing years of love and laughter.

Grooming TIps

There are two types of Brussels Griffon, with two types of coats: smooth and rough. With the smooth-coated Griffon, weekly brushing'¿daily during shedding season, which is usually a week or two in the spring, and then again in the fall'¿and the occasional bath will help to remove dirt and loose hair and keep the dog looking his best. Rough-coated Griffons do not shed. Many have their hair'¿except for the distinctive beard'¿clipped short, either by their owner or a professional groomer. As with all breeds, the nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can be painful to the dog and cause problems walking and running.

 

Bull Terrier Breed

 

Among the most comical and mischievous citizens of dogdom, the Bull Terrier is playful and endearing, sometimes stubborn, but always devoted. These unique 'eggheads' are exuberant, muscular companions who thrive on affection and exercise. Bull Terriers are robust, big-boned terriers who move with a jaunty stride suggesting agility and power. The breed's hallmark is a long, egg-shaped head with erect and pointed ears, and small, triangular eyes that glisten with good humor. Coats come in two types: white; and any other color (including an attractive brindle striping), either solid or with white markings. A well-made BT is the picture of muscular determination and balance. There are four keys to BT happiness: early socialization with dogs and people; firm but loving training; ample exercise; and lots of quality time with his adored humans. If these requirements are met, there is no more loyal, lovable, and entertaining companion. This is the ultimate 'personality breed.'

Grooming Tips:

The Bull Terrier's short, flat, harsh, and glossy coat requires minimal maintenance. A weekly brushing with a soft-bristle brush or a hound glove will help to remove dirt and loose hair and keep the dog looking his best. The ears  should be regularly inspected and cleaned if needed. The nails should be trimmed often, as overly long nails can cause the dog discomfort and problems walking and running. Source

 

Bulldog Breed

 

Kind but courageous, friendly but dignified, the Bulldog is a thick-set, low-slung, well-muscled bruiser whose 'sourmug' face is the universal symbol of courage and tenacity. These docile, loyal companions adapt well to town or country. 

You can't mistake a Bulldog for any other breed. The loose skin of the head, furrowed brow, pushed-in nose, small ears, undershot jaw with hanging chops on either side, and the distinctive rolling gait all practically scream 'I'm a Bulldog!' The coat, seen in a variety of colors and patterns, is short, smooth, and glossy. Bulldogs can weigh up to 50 pounds, but that won't stop them from curling up in your lap, or at least trying to. But don't mistake their easygoing ways for laziness'¿Bulldogs enjoy brisk walks and need regular moderate exercise, along with a careful diet, to stay trim. Summer afternoons are best spent in an air-conditioned room as a Bulldog's short snout can cause labored breathing in hot and humid weather.

Grooming Tips

An all-over brushing with a soft brush for 10 minutes two or three times a week will keep the Bulldog looking his best. During periods of heavier shedding, it can help to first use a rubber curry brush. The wrinkles on the Bulldog's face need to be regularly checked to make sure the skin is clean and dry, as food or moisture can get trapped and cause irritation or infection. A cotton ball dipped in peroxide can be used to clean the wrinkles, and cornstarch can be applied afterward to aid in drying'¿although neither should be used near the eyes. The ears and the area under the tail should be kept clean, and the dog's nails trimmed every two weeks or so.

 

Bullmastiff Breed

 

Fearless at work, docile at home, the Bullmastiff is a large, muscular guarder who pursued and held poachers in Merry Old England'¿merry, we suppose, for everyone but poachers. Bullmastiffs are the result of Bulldog and Mastiff crosses. The Bullmastiff isn't quite as large as his close cousin the Mastiff. Still, standing as high as 27 inches at the shoulder and weighing between 100 and 130 pounds, this is still a whole lot of dog. After the first impression made by the Bullmastiff's size, it is the large, broad head that conveys the breed's essence: the dark eyes, high-set V-shaped ears, and broad, deep muzzle all combine to present the intelligence, alertness, and confidence that make the Bullmastiff a world-class protector and family companion. Coats come in fawn, red, or brindle. These are biddable and reliable creatures, but as with any large guarding dog, owners must begin training and socialization early, while the puppy is still small enough to control.

Grooming Tips:

Seasonal shedding is to be expected, though unusual hair loss should be noted as a possible problem. A balanced diet and a healthy environment are most important for coat health. Frequent grooming ensures that shedding can be managed, and dogs should be bathed as needed. The skin and coat should be monitored in order to ensure that dryness or oiliness are not issues. These can be related to diet, and sometimes to allergies. Source

 

Cairn Terrier Breed

 

Cairn Terriers are happy, busy little earthdogs originally bred to fearlessly root out foxes and other small, furred prey in the rocky Scottish countryside. Curious and alert, Cairns like having a place where they can explore and dig. The Cairn's unique qualities, called 'Cairnishness,' include a short, wide head and a free-moving, short-legged body that exudes strength but not heaviness, topping out at about 10 inches high and about 15 inches long. The double coat is harsh and wiry on top and downy beneath. A Cairn presents as a small, shaggy, alert dog, with head, tail, and ears up, and eyes shining with intelligence. A British breed club promotes Cairns as the 'best little pal in the world.' Cairns are small enough for a lap-top snuggle and sturdy enough for a good romp on the lawn. They do best with lots of close family contact. For owners who cherish the terrier qualities of gameness, independent thinking, and true-blue loyalty, no other breed will do.

Grooming Tips

Cairn Terriers are generally easy keepers, although weekly brushing and combing are recommended, as well as periodic hand-stripping to maintain the coat's texture. Having a comb and soft slicker brush handy will help with the grooming tasks. With a new puppy, spending time together in grooming sessions helps to accustom him or her to being worked with and is an opportunity to develop the bond between you. The nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can cause the dog discomfort.

 

Canaan Dog Breed

 

One of the AKC's oldest breeds, the Canaan Dog is the national dog of Israel. This quick, medium-sized pasture dog is docile with family, aloof with strangers. The ever-alert Canaan is a vocal and persistent guardian of flock and home. Canaan Dogs are lean, bushy-tailed dogs standing 19 to 24 inches at the shoulder. The coat is straight and harsh, and comes in various colors and patterns. Erect, expressive ears and dark almond eyes convey an inquisitive expression. Canaans move at a brisk, natural trot. They are rugged, agile, and apparently tireless, making them a nice fit for hikers and runners. Canaans are clever, confident, and territorial. They will end up "owning" passive owners who haven't establish themselves as top dog in the family pack. Early training and socialization are key. When positive methods are applied, these ancient wonder-dogs train beautifully. Agility, obedience, herding trials, and sentry duty are a few outlets for their work ethic.

Grooming Tips

Canaans tend to stay clean and normally require less frequent baths than other moderately active breeds. They have a double coat, consisting of a harsh, flat outer coat and a softer undercoat. They will have a shedding season at least once a year'¿frequent brushing during this time will help to remove loose hair and keep the dog looking his best. The nails should be trimmed regularly if they don't wear down naturally, as overly long nails can cause discomfort and structural issues.

 

Cane Corso Breed

 

Smart, trainable, and of noble bearing, the assertive and confident Cane Corso is a peerless protector. The Corso's lineage goes back to ancient Roman times, and the breed's name roughly translates from the Latin as 'bodyguard dog.' At nearly 28 inches at the shoulder and often weighing more than 100 pounds, with a large head, alert expression, and muscles rippling beneath their short, stiff coat, Corsi are at a glance intimidating creatures. Their imposing appearance is their first line of defense against intruders. As one writer put it, 'An understated air of cool competence, the kind of demeanor you'd expect from a professional bodyguard, is the breed's trademark.' Corsi are intelligent, loyal, eager to please, versatile, and intensely loyal to their humans, but are also assertive and willful, and can end up owning an unwitting owner. As with any other big guardian dog, responsible breeding and early socialization with people and other dogs is vital. 

Grooming Tips:

The Cane Corso's coat is short, but double-layered. The undercoat, which varies in length depending on the climate the dog lives in, sheds throughout the year, especially during shedding season in the spring. Weekly brushing'¿daily during shedding season'¿with a medium-bristle brush, a rubber grooming mitt or tool, or a hound glove will remove the dead hair before it can fall onto the furniture, and it helps remove dirt and promotes new hair growth as well. As with all breeds, the nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can be painful to the dog and cause problems walking and running. Source

 

Cardigan Welsh Corgi Breed

 

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is a masterpiece of the breeder's art: Every aspect of its makeup is perfectly suited to moving cattle, and yet it is so congenial and sweet-faced that it would be a cherished companion even if it never did a day's work. Long, low-set dogs with sturdy bone, short legs, and a deep chest, Cardigans are powerful workers of deceptive speed and grace. Cardis can weigh anywhere from 25 to 34 pounds, with females at the lower end of the scale. They come in several coat colors, from red to the popular blue-merle pattern. The quickest way to distinguish Cardis from their cousins, Pembroke Welsh Corgis, is to check out the hindquarters: Cardigans have tails; Pembrokes do not. Cardis are trainable, faithful, and vigilant guardians with a 'big dog' bark. Well-socialized Cardis are especially fond of kids and agreeable with other pets. These athletic, rugged herders have a love for the outdoors, and they thrive on mental stimulation and physical activity.

Grooming Tips

A good brushing at least once a week should keep the Cardigan's coat healthy and looking its best. Keeping the hair trimmed on the bottom of the feet helps to reduce the amount of dirt that an animal can bring into the house every day. The nails should be kept trimmed as well. Some pet owners mistakenly feel they should have their dog trimmed short for the summer. When the coat of the Cardigan is correct for the breed, this isn't necessary. The correct coat has the essential characteristics to maintain proper body temperature, as long as conditions are normal. It should be noted, however, that a black dog will absorb more heat on a sunny day, and care should be taken to avoid overexposure during hot weather.

 

Carolina Dog Breed

 

Carolina Dogs are generally shy and suspicious in nature, but once a dog accepts a human into its pack, those behaviors disappear toward that human. A sighthound of medium build, they have the general appearance of a jackal or wolf.

Carolina dogs are descended from the canines that accompanied the Paleo-Indians who traveled from Asia to North America over the Bering land bridge. Today, they can still be found living wild near the Georgia-South Carolina border, but have also been seen as far north as Ohio and Pennsylvania and as far west as Arizona; rural areas are the common denominator. The typical Carolina dog has pointed ears, a fox-like snout and a tail that curves like a fishhook when it is raised. They look similar to Australian Dingoes but, taxonomically, they fall under canis familiaris. Hesitant with strangers, they will sound the alarm when unaware of who's at the door, but once they see their people, they are ecstatic. Carolina Dogs have an extreme pack mentality, as this was a necessity for survival in the wild.

Grooming Tips:

Minimal grooming is needed for Carolina Dogs. They tend to keep themselves clean much like a cat; however, occasional bathing may be necessary. These dogs do not require any special grooming techniques other than brushing and nail trimming. Coat length is short to medium, though, some dogs in the northern regions have developed a longer hair length. Coat density is effected seasonally, generally heavier in the cooler months and lighter in the warmer months. In cooler months, there should be a very pronounced undercoat. Short and smooth hair is found on the head, ears and front legs. Coarse, long guard hairs are on the neck, withers and back. When aroused, these hairs stand erect. Source

 

 Catahoula leopard Dog Breed

 

The Catahoula Leopard Dog is a multi-purpose working dog that is well-muscled and powerful, but with a sense of agility and endurance. They are serious while working and playful at home. The Catahoula Leopard Dog is a medium-large, short-coated dog, known for its many varied coat and eye colors and patterns. The word is of Choctaw origin and is translated to mean "sacred lake." Catahoulas are the only breed of dog to have historically originated in the state of Louisiana. The breed requires firm guidance and early socialization, as they can be independent, territorial, and protective. For the same reasons, they do not allow mistreatment and will assert themselves in self-defense. Once they know their place in the family unit, they are affectionate, loyal, and gentle. Also called the Catahoula Hog Dog, they are used as stock dogs, bay dogs, tree dogs, watchdogs, guard dogs, and of course as loyal companions. 

Grooming Tips:

Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep your Catahoula clean and looking his best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your dog. The breed's strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly. Source

 

Caucasian Shepherd Dog Breed

 

The Caucasian Shepherd dog is a serious guardian breed and should never be taken lightly. The Caucasian is bold, fearless, self-confident and fierce when a threat is present, but he is soft, devoted, kind and endearing to his family, including other family pets. Caucasian Shepherd dogs were used for centuries to protect properties from trespassers, guard livestock from large and small predators such as wolves and coyotes, and for many other duties. In modern days, especially in the West, they're most commonly companions and watchdogs. There is a great variety of types among the Caucasian dogs depending on their home region. For almost a century, there has been two breed types and standards: The Mountain type, which is long-coated and has a heavier body mass than the Steppe type, a shorter-coated dog with a lighter body mass. Other names for the breed include Caucasian Ovcharka, Caucasian Sheepdog, Kawkasky Owtscharka, and Kaukasische Schaferhund.  

Grooming Tips

The Caucasian Shepherd has a variety of coat types, from very long to short. Longer-coated dogs need to be groomed daily. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your pet. Their strong fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

 

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Breed

 

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel wears his connection to British history in his breed's name. Cavaliers are the best of two worlds, combining the gentle attentiveness of a toy breed with the verve and athleticism of a sporting spaniel. The Cavalier's all-around beauty, regal grace, and even temper mark him as one of dogdom's noblemen. A toy spaniel no more than 13 inches high, the Cavalier draws you in with his face: The sweet, gentle, melting expression emanating from large, round eyes is a breed hallmark. Another is the silky, richly colored coat that can be one of four distinct varieties (described in this page's History section). Cavaliers may be aristocrats, but they gladly descend from their royal high horse for a backyard frolic or a squirrel chase. They get along nicely with children and other dogs. Adaptable Cavaliers do equally well with active owners and homebodies'¿they can be upbeat athletes or shameless couch potatoes, depending on an owner's lifestyle.

Grooming Tips

The Cavalier's lustrous, silky coat requires little more than regular brushing and an occasional bath to keep him in beautiful condition. Brushing not only helps to keep the coat shiny and tangle-free but also serves as a full-body massage that the dog enjoys. grooming sessions enhance the dog-owner bond and provide an opportunity to inspect the dog's whole body for any new or unusual bumps or other issues. The ears should be checked weekly for signs of infection, and the nails should be trimmed at least once a month, as overgrown nails can cause pain and structural problems.

 

Cavapoo (Cavalier King Charles Spaniel + Poodle) Breed

 

Cavapoo is a mixed breed dog that results from breeding the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and the Poodle. Curious, playful, outgoing and very social Cavapoos get along well with both humans and other pets as well. Cavapoo dogs inherit the best traits from their parents including the looks and impressive intelligence. With a lovely temperament, Cavapoos make great family companions and pets.

Cavapoos are also known as Cavoodle or Cavadoodle and were initially meant to be hypoallergenic and low-shedding dogs, which makes them ideal companions for individuals suffering from allergies. Owing to their cute looks and friendly nature, Cavapoo dogs grew to be popular among many dog lovers.

Cavapoo's small stature and low shedding nature make them ideal for apartment dwellers, singles and seniors who love including their dogs in every social activity. Cavapoo dogs generally do well with older kids who know how to appreciate their small nature and will enjoy romping around their owners.

Grooming Tips

Cavapoos' coats are dictated by their parents the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and the Poodle. Cavadoodles come in various colors which include fawn, cream, chocolate, chestnut, gold, and white. Mainly they have solid colors or tri-colors. Cavadoodle coat may be wavy or curly and soft to the touch. At times Cavapoo dogs can be quite fluffballs which require regular grooming.

Owing to the nature of their Poodle parent, they shed little which makes them ideal for allergy sufferers. Brushing the coat on a weekly basis should help keep the coat healthy. The curly coats help them tolerate moderate heat and cold. Like with all other dogs, Cavapoos should not be left out in either extreme cold or warm temperatures.

Since Cavapoos are considered low shedders a weekly brush will help keep their coats shiny and healthy while preventing knots at the same time. The amount of grooming will, however, depend on the type of your Cavapoo. Those with long hair will require more grooming and a monthly trimming or clipping may work well for them.

 

Central Asian Shepherd Dog Breed

 

The Central Asian Shepherd Dog is self-assured, balanced, quiet, proud and independent. They are very courageous and have a high working capacity, endurance and a natural instinct of territory. This breed is known for its fearlessness towards large predators. Central Asian Shepherd Dogs are a natural protective breed that require a non-stop observance for the life of the dog. They are not for first-time dog owners. They were formed as a breed from natural selection during more than four thousand years in a vast territory, which spreads nowadays from the Caspian Sea to China and from Southern Ural to Afghanistan.

Grooming Tips

The Central Asian Shepherd Dog requires very little grooming for their well-developed undercoat, but their once-a-year shedding is appropriately called the "fur storm." Beyond intermittent grooming, the occasional bath will keep them clean and looking their best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your pet. Their strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

 

Cesky Terrier Breed

 

The Cesky Terrier, national dog of the Czech Republic, is a clever and adventurous playmate for kids and an eager walking buddy for the folks. They are tenacious at work, but a little more laid back and tractable than the usual terrier. Ceskys are muscular, short-legged, and handsome hunters standing no taller than 13 inches at the shoulder. The fine, silky coat comes in several shades of gray, including a stunning platinum. Wavy facial hair gives Ceskys a sporty, Continental look, and the medium-long neck lends a dash of elegance to these game, unspoiled working terriers. While Ceskys are as determined and prey-driven as any other earthdog, they're mellower than a typical terrier. Wary of strangers and protective of loved ones, they're good watchdogs without being particularly yappy. They train well and want to please. Here's the catch: They are a scarce breed, with only about 600 living in America. A wonderful family dog, if you're lucky enough to find one.

Grooming Tips

Unlike grooming of some terrier breeds, hand stripping is not suggested for the Cesky's coat. Instead, the body is clipped. You should visit a professional groomer referred by your breeder to be sure your dog is groomed correctly. There are so few Ceskys around that it is unlikely that most groomers have ever even heard of the breed. In between groomings, as the Cesky coat does not shed dirt as some harder coats do, he will need regular baths. They tend to grow a lot of hair in the ears, and this should be removed during each grooming appointment to prevent an ear infection. Ears should be cleaned regularly to remove excess wax and other debris.

 

Chesapeake Bay Retriever Breed

 

The Chesapeake Bay Retriever, peerless duck dog of the Mid-Atlantic, is an American original who embodies the classic traits of a good retriever: loyal, upbeat, affectionate, and tireless. The Chessie is famous for his waterproof coat. Chessies are strong, powerfully built gundogs standing anywhere from 21 to 26 inches at the shoulder. A male can weigh up to 80 pounds. The distinctive breed trait is a wavy coat that is oily to the touch. Chessies are solid-colored, either chocolatey brown, sedge, or deadgrass, with keen yellow-amber eyes that nicely complement the coat. Chessies are more emotionally complex than the usual gundog. Chessies take to training, but they have a mind of their own and can tenaciously pursue their own path. They are protective of their humans and polite, but not overtly friendly, to strangers. Chessies make excellent watchdogs and are versatile athletes. A well-socialized Chessie is a confident companion and world-class hunting buddy.

Grooming Tips

This is a shorthaired breed with a soft undercoat and a harsh outer coat. They do shed, and a good brushing about once a week will keep the dead hair on your floor to a minimum. Basically, Chessies don't require much grooming or bathing. As with all breeds, the nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can cause discomfort and problems walking and running.

 

Chihuahua Breed

 

The Chihuahua is a tiny dog with a huge personality. A national symbol of Mexico, these alert and amusing "purse dogs" stand among the oldest breeds of the Americas, with a lineage going back to the ancient kingdoms of pre-Columbian times. The Chihuahua is a balanced, graceful dog of terrier-like demeanor, weighing no more than 6 pounds. The rounded "apple" head is a breed hallmark. The erect ears and full, luminous eyes are acutely expressive. Coats come in many colors and patterns, and can be long or short. The varieties are identical except for coat. Chihuahuas possess loyalty, charm, and big-dog attitude. Even tiny dogs require training, and without it this clever scamp will rule your household like a little Napoleon. Compact and confident, Chihuahuas are ideal city pets. They are too small for roughhousing with kids, and special care must be taken in cold weather, but Chihuahuas are adaptable'¿as long as they get lots of quality time in their preferred lap.

Grooming Tips:

The two coat varieties of the Chihuahua have slightly different grooming needs. The smooth-coat Chihuahua will need only occasional brushing and regular baths to look dapper, while the longhaired variety should have his coat brushed at least once a week to avoid any tangles or mats. Both varieties should have their nails trimmed regularly. Good dental care is necessary and should include brushing your dog's teeth, and the vet might also recommend treats designed as part of a tooth-care program. Check the Chihuahua's ears regularly, and remove any excess wax or debris to avoid ear infections. Source

 

Chinese Crested Dog Breed

 

With their spotted pink skin, spiky 'crested' hairdo, furry socks and feathery tail, you can't mistake the sweet and slender Chinese Crested for any other breed. This frolicsome, ultra-affectionate companion dog is truly a breed apart. The Chinese Crested, a lively and alert toy breed standing between 11 and 13 inches high, can be hairless or coated. The hairless variety has smooth, soft skin and tufts of hair on the head, tail, and ankles. The coated variety, called the 'powderpuff,' is covered by a soft, silky coat. Besides the coat, there's very little difference between the powderpuff and his undressed brother. Both varieties are characterized by fine-boned elegance and graceful movement. Cresteds are as fun as they look: playful, loving, and devoted to their humans. The hairless has its advantages: there is no doggy odor, and for obvious reasons shedding isn't much of a problem. Both varieties are attentive housemates, totally in tune with their family.

Grooming Tips

You might think that the hairless variation of the Chinese Crested would require almost no grooming. After all, he has no hair. However, because his skin is exposed, the hairless Crested is prone to skin irritations, allergies, and sunburn. Careful grooming, including skin treatments specifically for your dog's skin type, sunscreen, and acne lotions are necessary to maintain a healthy pet. The Powderpuff version needs to be brushed daily to maintain his fluffy coat. The Powderpuff's coat is different than that of most other dogs. The undercoat is shorter than the longer overlay, which is the opposite of most haired breeds. This makes them easier to brush, but the coat can mat quickly.

 

Chinese Shar-Pie Breed

 

This fascinating but challenging breed of ancient pedigree is steadfastly loyal to family, but standoffish with strangers. The Chinese Shar-Pei has physical characteristics that make him a one-of-a-kind companion and guardian dog. The compact, medium-sized Chinese Shar-Pei is an amalgam of odd physical traits: a broad 'hippopotamus' muzzle; a blue-black tongue; small, sunken eyes with a scowling expression; tiny triangular ears; abundant folds of loose skin about the head, neck, and shoulders; the tapered high-set tail'¿all blanketed by a harsh, sandpapery coat. (A literal translation of Shar-Pei: 'sand skin.') Shar-Pei are strong, regal, independent guardians famous for intelligence and loyalty. They are suspicious of strangers and other dogs. Shar-Pei are serene dogs, but they will meet a perceived threat with tenacity and vigor. Early training and socialization are essential'¿a dominant adult Shar-Pei without them is a serious problem waiting to happen.

Grooming Tips:

The Chinese Shar-Pei requires only minimal grooming. They need a bath only every month or so. Nails should be trimmed once a week, ideally using a grinder. The ears should be cleaned weekly, but don't overdo the products. The pup should be accustomed at a young age to having his ears cleaned regularly. Do not use cotton swabs, and do not use hydrogen peroxide. The best way to clean the ear canal is to "float' debris out of the canal using an ear-cleaning solution. A wide variety of good solutions are available on the market and from the veterinarian. Source

 

Chinook Breed

 

The pride of Wonalancet, New Hampshire, the Chinook is a rugged working dog and devoted family pet known for intelligence, patience, and eagerness to please. Once on the verge of extinction, the Chinook is among the scarcest AKC breeds. Tawny-coated, no-frills Chinooks are muscular and substantial, with males standing as high as 26 inches at the shoulder. Females, with their distinctly feminine look, are a bit smaller. Chinooks were conceived as dual-purpose haulers, with the power of freighting dogs and the speed of sled racers. They are the picture of stouthearted dignity, with a kindly twinkle in their dark, almond eyes. Chinooks are calm, people-oriented dogs with a special feel for children. They are trainable workers who aim to please. Sledding, carting, obedience, agility, search-and-rescue work, and herding are a few pursuits they've mastered. Chinooks are not particularly busy dogs, but they need consistent exercise to stay in proper hard condition.

Grooming Tips

The Chinook's plush double coat is fairly easy to care for. Like all mammals, Chinooks shed a bit throughout the year. Weekly brushing will help to remove dirt and loose hair and keep the dog looking his best. Longer, daily brushing sessions will be required during shedding season, which generally occurs twice a year, but happens more often with spayed or neutered animals. As with all breeds, the nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can be painful to the dog and cause problems walking and running.

 

Chow Chow Breed

 

The Chow Chow, an all-purpose dog of ancient China, presents the picture of a muscular, deep-chested aristocrat with an air of inscrutable timelessness. Dignified, serious-minded, and aloof, the Chow Chow is a breed of unique delights. Chows are powerful, compactly built dogs standing as high as 20 inches at the shoulder. Their distinctive traits include a lion's-mane ruff around the head and shoulders; a blue-black tongue; deep-set almond eyes that add to a scowling, snobbish expression; and a stiff-legged gait. Chows can have rough or smooth coats of red, black, blue, cinnamon, or cream. Owners say Chows are the cleanest of dogs: They housebreak easily, have little doggy odor, and are known to be as fastidious as cats. Well-socialized Chows are never fierce or intractable, but always refined and dignified. They are aloof with strangers and eternally loyal to loved ones. Serene and adaptable, with no special exercise needs, Chows happily take to city life.

Grooming Tips

Both the rough- and smooth-coated Chows have a profuse double coat and require regular grooming. Thorough brushing at least twice per week and a monthly bath can keep the dog's skin and coat healthy. Be sure to immediately remedy any parasite issues, such as fleas or ticks. Include eye and ear care with each grooming, and trim nails regularly. Puppy coat and the coat around the head can become badly matted if not groomed regularly. Care must be taken to remove all mats and brush or comb through the undercoat. It is preferable to use a cool air dryer to thoroughly dry the Chow after a bath.

 

Chow Doodle (Chow Chow + Poodle) Breed

 

The Chow Chow Poodle Mix is a mixed breed dog resulting from breeding the Chow Chow and the Poodle. This is obviously a unique mix that could be a little on the aggressive side if the Chow shines through.

Chow Doodles are patient, calm, and often display an independent streak. That’s why many people compare them to cats, as they tend to enjoy their own company just as much as they enjoy human company. Nevertheless, Chow Doodles make great family pets – they’re affectionate, even-tempered, and bond easily with their families. And, of course, the Chow Chow Poodle mix benefits from the hypoallergenic Poodle genes, which results in a low-shedding Chow Doodle. 

Grooming Tips

This could be a more aggressive shedder if the Poodle shines through. Be prepared to brush them a few times a week. Either way, get ready to invest in a good vacuum if you want to keep your floors clean! Give them baths as needed, but not so much that you dry out their skin. Never tie your dog up outside - that is inhumane and not fair to him.

 

Cirneco dell’Etna Breed

 

The sleek and sinewy Cirneco dell'Etna, the ancient coursing hound of Sicily, is an athletic hunter given to quick bursts of speed. As housedogs, Cirnechi are mild, low-maintenance companions cherished for their loyal and gentle nature. Standing under 20 inches, the Cirneco ('cheer-NEK-o'; Cirnechi is the plural) is often described as resembling a smaller version of the Pharaoh Hound, its cousin from the island of Malta. This slender but rugged hunter's coat ranges from light to dark tan or chestnut. The large, upright ears point up the alert expression of the eyes, whose amber or ochre color smartly complements the coat. In many ways, these lithe and leggy Sicilians are typical sighthounds: sweet-natured, independent and, of course, breathtakingly swift. It is said, though, that Cirnechi are a bit more trainable than the usual sighthound. These living artifacts of antiquity have sprinted into the 21st century relatively unchanged by passing fads and fancies.

Grooming Tips:

The Cirneco's short-haired, smooth coat requires minimal care. Gentle weekly brushing with a soft bristle brush or hound glove should keep him looking his best, with an occasional bath only as needed. His ears should be regularly inspected for dirt or buildup of excess wax and cleaned if needed with soft gauze and an ear-cleaning solution'¿the dog's breeder or the veterinarian can recommend a good brand to use. The nails should be trimmed often if not worn down naturally, as overly long nails can cause the dog discomfort. Source

 

Clumber Spaniel Breed

 

A dignified and mellow hunting companion of kings, the Clumber Spaniel is the largest of the AKC flushing spaniels. For those who can handle some shedding and drooling, the amiable Clumber is an amusing best friend and a gentlemanly housemate. Clumber Spaniels are powerful bird dogs of heavy bone, built long and low, with a massive head. They stand 17 to 20 inches; a small female might be 55 pounds, and a large male could go 85 pounds. Built to push through thick cover in the field, Clumber movement is nonetheless free and easy. The dense coat is primarily white, with sparse lemon or orange markings. Clumbers are sweet and easygoing at home, but these outdoorsy fellows can be relentless on scent. Smart and eager-to-please Clumbers respond well to training. Though a bit wary around strangers, Clumbers are friendly dogs who bark only when they have something to say, and so make indifferent watchdogs. They love swimming and fetching, and are sturdy childhood playmates.

Grooming Tips

As with all breeds with heavy, lowset ears, routine cleaning of the ears is a must to avoid ear infections. The heavy folds on the head require regular once-overs with a damp cloth. Wrinkles that are not kept dry can easily set up a yeast infection that has a bad odor and is unpleasant for the dog. Nails should be kept short with monthly trims. Bathing once a month is usually sufficient for a dog who isn't working regularly in the field. Clumbers don't require a lot of trimming; their coat is very easy care, requiring little more than a thorough grooming with a brush and a medium comb once or twice a week.

 

Cockapoo (Cocker Spaniel + Poodle) Breed

 

Size. Size is determined by the height, rather than the weight, of the adult dog. Height is measured to the top of the shoulder in standing position.

Toy:

10” or less at shoulder height – under 12 pounds as a general rule

Mini:

11” – 14” at shoulder - usually 12-20 pounds

Standard:

15” or higher – over 20 pounds

COLOR AND MARKINGS:

Typical colors

black, white, buff, cream, apricot, red, chocolate; any of these colors with white markings

Parti

two or more solid colors, one of which must be white

Phantom

usually a black body with brown color on legs, under tail, eyebrows, side of face

Sable

black or dark brown at birth, lightening to a mix of gold, silver, red, brown, or tan; darker points in coloring, usually on the face and ears

Tri-color

parti color with tan markings over eyes, on muzzle, ears, legs and sometimes chest

Merle

lighter colors of the base color swirled with the darker base color

Roan

single white hairs and white patches intermingled with the base color

Personality. Cockapoos are highly trainable, with a keen intelligence. They are curious and eager to perform. They do well with one-person owners as well as with families with young children. They are very people-oriented, outgoing and happy dogs.

Hair. Coat is usually dense; may be wavy or curly; usually little-to-no-shedding.

Tails. Tails may be docked or not. (Both are acceptable.)

Lifespan. Generally 14 to 18 years, even into the 20’s.

Activity Level. They adapt well to apartments and homes, but are also “at home” on the largest farm. They have a moderate activity level. Cockapoos are not meant to be outside dogs.

Grooming Tips

The puppy coat of the Cockapoo is relatively easy to look after regardless of the Coat Type Variations. So for the first six months a very simple grooming regime of regular brushing sessions of 10 minutes or so, four to five times a week should keep your puppy in good order. A simple grooming kit consisting of a comb, a brush, nail clippers and a slicker brush will be all the tools you will need for these first months. Intermingle treats and praise with the grooming to make this a pleasant experience. Even though your puppy may not really need this recommended amount of grooming, it will later on when the adult coat 'comes in' so it's a valuable time to familiarise your puppy with being groomed. All dogs nails will need trimming every 2-3 months with nail clippers. If you do this yourself be conservative with the amount you cut off, just the very end hooks is sufficient. Alternatively any dog groomer should be able do it for you at very little cost.

If you use puppy shampoo that is free from soap and detergents (examples on the Links page) then you can bath your puppy as often as you like without drying out the skin. All dogs react differently to being bathed but familiarity at the early ages will pay dividends later. A calm approach and an extra pair of hands to help should make the experience a positive one.

 

Cocker Spaniel Breed

 

The merry and frolicsome Cocker Spaniel, with his big, dreamy eyes and impish personality, is one of the world's best-loved breeds. They were developed as hunting dogs, but Cockers gained their wide popularity as all-around companions. Those big, dark eyes; that sweet expression; those long, lush ears that practically demand to be touched'¿no wonder the Cocker spent years as America's most popular breed. The Cocker is the AKC's smallest sporting spaniel, standing about 14 to 15 inches. The coat comes in enough colors and patterns to please any taste. The well-balanced body is sturdy and solid, and these quick, durable gundogs move with a smooth, easy gait. Cockers are eager playmates for kids and are easily trained as companions and athletes. They are big enough to be sporty, but compact enough to be portable. A Cocker in full coat rewards extra grooming time by being the prettiest dog on the block. These energetic sporting dogs love playtime and brisk walks.

Grooming Tips

Cocker Spaniels require regular, thorough grooming. Sessions missed are not easily made up and may result in tangles or mats in the Cocker's coat. A metal, professional-quality dog comb with fine and medium spacing for the teeth is a necessity. You can follow combing with a gentle slicker brush, but the comb is key. Loose hair should be carefully removed with the comb, making sure you are clear and can see through to the skin everywhere. If you encounter snarls, do not pull through; rather, pick snarls apart, starting at the tips of the coat and then comb through. Be cautious when combing ears; the skin at the edges is thin and can be pierced by too-vigorous combing. The Cocker requires thorough bathing with quality dog shampoo. Thorough rinsing and re-rinsing are crucial, as soap residue can cause skin irritation. Dry carefully with a blow-dryer on not too hot a setting. Learn the procedure for cleaning and drying the ear canals. During bathing, check the Cocker's skin for any inflamed spots and get treatment. It is key to learn grooming procedures yourself and/or enlist the services of a professional groomer who likes and is experienced in grooming the breed.

 

Collie – smooth coated Breed

 

A born herding dog, Collies are known for their alert, intense gaze that developed to help them spot and wrangle wandering sheep. They are intelligent, playful, and are usually gentle with children. The breed's long-coated variety with the distinctive mane is the most common and familiar, but Collies come in a short-coated variety as well. Their heads are graceful and tapered to the nose, and they have ears that break forward at the top. Collies are athletic, medium-build dogs who are agile and swift. Source

Nutrition:

Collies require about two to three cups of quality dry dog food each day, split between two meals. The amount will vary depending on the size, weight, and age of your dog. Source

Grooming tips:

Brush your double coated dog a few times a week, getting right into the under coat with a special ‘rake’ designed to remove the undercoat to allow the air to circulate and the skin to breath.

Use a coat detangler spray to help when brushing out any knots.

Use a dog specific, natural and Ph Balanced dog shampoo and conditioner when washing your dog and make sure it is well rinsed out.

After any ocean swims, wash the salt water out.

Make sure your dog’s undercoat is dried after a wash or swim to avoid bacteria building up and skin irritations and infections.

If you find your dog gets a lot of knots or matting, take to the groomer every few weeks for a tidy and brush out. Source

Grooming tips:

Grooming a Collie can be lots of fun for you and your dog – or, it can be a real battle if the process is not started early enough. Your Collie’s first bath should be at around seven weeks of age and it should be a fun experience. Just be gentle, use warm water and make a big deal about how wonderful bathtime is. If your puppy has a bad experience with his first bath he will always remember it and he may never want to take a bath again.

To best groom a Collie, brush the dog once or twice a week for a Rough Collie or once a week for a Smooth Collie. Grooming should take you about 10 to 20 minutes to do a good job, depending on the amount of coat your dog has and the time of year.

Rough Collies will blow coat twice a year. During this heavy shedding period, brush your Rough Collie daily to help control the shedding.

If you have a Smooth Collie, the dog will not blow coat. So just brush this dog once a week to keep shedding under control.

In addition to brushing, you should bathe your Collie at least four times a year. Also, trim your Collie’s nails once a month as needed. Check your Collie’s ears once a week for dirt, redness or odor that can indicate an infection. And don’t forget about daily tooth brushing to improve your dog’s health and keep his breath fresh. Source

 

Coton de tulear Breed

 

The Coton de Tulear, 'Royal Dog of Madagascar,' is a bright, happy-go-lucky companion dog whose favorite activities include clowning, cavorting, and following their special human around the house. The Coton is small but robustly sturdy. The Coton de Tulear (KO-Tone Dih TOO-Lay-ARE) is a small, immensely charming dog standing between 9 and 11 inches high and weighing anywhere from 8 to 13 pounds. Cotons are known for a profuse white coat that is as soft as cotton (or, as the French say, 'coton'). Their primary job is to provide amusement, comfort, and companionship. The bond between Cotons and their people is so tight that owners discuss it in human terms. Coton fanciers describe them as 'witty' companions 'at times boisterous but never demanding' and 'naturally clownish and lighthearted,' who possess a 'remarkably gentle, sympathetic awareness.' Amusing traits of these long-lived jesters include unique vocalizations and a knack for walking on their hind legs.

Grooming Tips

Grooming the Coton puppy is a breeze. During that time you should groom him regularly and ensure that he learns to see grooming sessions as positive times of bonding with his person. Unless you are going to keep your Coton in a short 'puppy clip,' your dog will require a great deal of brushing. You must be careful to get your comb and brush all the way to the skin (gently) during daily brushing, or the hair next to the skin will mat and if this is too extensive your dog may need to be shaved down. You should use a spray conditioner while brushing to avoid breakage. A couple of times a week, check the ears and remove any excess hair, wax, or debris to avoid ear infections.

 

Croatian Sheepdog Breed

 

The Croatian Sheepdog is an agile, helpful and humble shepherd dog, self-reliant to his owner, brave and trustworthy. He is the true master of his flock, often running through the back of the herd to get to the point of intervention as soon as possible.

Petar Horvat, the bishop of Djakovo, wrote in 1374 that Croats had brought a shepherd dog along on the move to their new land. He referred to the dog as Canis Pastoralis Croaticus'the Croatian Shepherd Dog. The bishop of Djakovo, Peter Bakic also wrote about the Croatian Sheepdog in his 1719 manuscript 'On the Life of the People and Raising of Stock in Djakovo and it's Surroundings in 1719'. He quoted the words written by Bishop Petar in 1374 and, providing his own description of the dog, stated that the Croatian Sheepdog had not changed since the record (from 1374 to 1719) and had not changed in appearance from that described by Bishop Petar in 1374. A systematic selection breeding program was started by the "father of the breed" - veterinarian Prof Dr Stjepan Romic in 1935 with dogs in the territory of Djakovo. After 34 years of work, the breed was recognized by the FCI in 1969.

Grooming Tips

The Croatian Sheepdog is an easily cared for breed. Occasional baths, a combing or bushing to remove dead hair, and regular nail care is sufficient for this wash-and-wear breed.

 

Curly Coated Retriever Breed

 

The Curly-Coated Retriever, among the oldest of the retriever breeds, is a famously versatile gundog and peerless swimmer. Poised, proud, and wickedly smart, the Curly is a thinking person's retriever who will never quit before you do. The Curly-Coated Retriever's tight, crisp curls of either black or liver serve as waterproof and thorn-resistant all-weather gear for work in thick bramble and icy lakes. The Curly is a big, durable gun dog, but more elegant and graceful than other retrievers. Another trait that sets Curlies apart from the usual retriever is a tapered, wedge-shaped head. Like Labradors and Goldens, Curlies are affectionate and gentle, but they are a bit more independent and less needy. Playful and mischievous with loved ones, Curlies can be aloof with strangers. This wariness makes them more discerning watchdogs than other, more gregarious retrievers. These tireless dogs need lots of outdoor exercise. Bored, underemployed Curlies are a handful.

Grooming Tips

Curlies do not have an undercoat, and the females will usually shed a fair amount of coat approximately every six months. Females may look relatively bare when not in coat. During shedding season a rake-type grooming tool with metal prongs is good at removing the dead hair, then the coat can be scissored down. The majority of owners never brush a Curly-Coated Retriever, as then the coat frizzes. A wet-down and air-dry is easy to do and often will enhance the curls. The breed does not need to be bathed frequently. As with all breeds, the nails should be trimmed regularly.

 

Czechoslovakian Vlcak Breed

 

An alert, primitive canine that resembles a wolf in appearance. They are highly intelligent, powerful, active, loyal and devoted to it's owner. They have superior eyesight, hearing and sense of smell and are known for having excellent stamina and endurance. The Czechoslovakian Vlcak (CSV) was originally bred for working border patrol in Czechoslovakia in the 1950s. They are currently used in Europe and the United States for search and rescue, tracking, obedience, agility, drafting, herding, and working dog sports. The CSV is bred for versatility and hardiness in harsh elements and is much more independent in nature than many other working breeds. They are an excellent choice for tracking or trailing sport/work, or as a companion for active owners who enjoy spending time doing outdoor activities such as biking, running, or hiking. They are not, however, recommended for first time owners. Club Contact Details Czechoslovakian Vlcak Club of America Stacy McCrary, President vlcaksusa@gmail.com

Grooming Tips

Czechoslovakian Vlcaks have a weather resistant coat; it naturally cleans itself of mud and dirt. They seldom need a bath and have little to no body odor. They shed twice-a-year and at that time daily brushing is required. The winter coat is thicker, heavier and longer than the shorter, thinner summer coat and this may require more grooming during the colder months of the year. Their strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

 

Dachshund Breed

 

The famously long, low silhouette, ever-alert expression, and bold, vivacious personality of the Dachshund have made him a superstar of the canine kingdom. Dachshunds come in two sizes and in three coat types of various colors and patterns. The word 'icon' is terribly overworked, but the Dachshund'¿with his unmistakable long-backed body, little legs, and big personality'¿is truly an icon of purebred dogdom. Dachshunds can be standard-sized (usually 16 to 32 pounds) or miniature (11 pounds or under), and come in one of three coat types: smooth, wirehaired, or longhaired. Dachshunds aren't built for distance running, leaping, or strenuous swimming, but otherwise these tireless hounds are game for anything. Smart and vigilant, with a big-dog bark, they make fine watchdogs. Bred to be an independent hunter of dangerous prey, they can be brave to the point of rashness, and a bit stubborn, but their endearing nature and unique look has won millions of hearts the world over.

Grooming Tips:

Dachshunds are moderate shedders, relatively clean, and have little or no body odor. The breed's grooming needs vary with the three coat types. Smooth-coated Dachshunds are somewhat 'wash and wear,' needing little beyond a wipe with a towel or hound glove to look dapper. Longhaired Dachshunds may require more frequent brushing, depending on the thickness of the coat. The Wirehaired coat can be plucked or hand-stripped several times a year to look its best, but beyond that is easy to maintain between groomings with occasional trimming of the beard and eyebrows and brushing or combing once or twice a week. All Dachshunds should have their nails trimmed every month. Source

 

Dalmatian Breed

 

The dignified Dalmatian, dogdom's citizen of the world, is famed for his spotted coat and unique job description. During their long history, these "coach dogs" have accompanied the horse-drawn rigs of nobles, gypsies, and firefighters. The Dalmatian's delightful, eye-catching spots of black or liver adorn one of the most distinctive coats in the animal kingdom. Beneath the spots is a graceful, elegantly proportioned trotting dog standing between 19 and 23 inches at the shoulder. Dals are muscular, built to go the distance; the powerful hindquarters provide the drive behind the smooth, effortless gait. The Dal was originally bred to guard horses and coaches, and some of the old protective instinct remains. Reserved and dignified, Dals can be aloof with strangers and are dependable watchdogs. With their preferred humans, Dals are bright, loyal, and loving house dogs. They are strong, active athletes with great stamina'¿a wonderful partner for runners and hikers.

Grooming Tips:

The Dalmatian's coat is a thing of beauty with its colored spots on a sparkling white background, and it doesn't take much work to keep it in good condition. Occasional baths and weekly brushing with a horsehair mitt or rubber curry comb to pull away dead hairs will keep the Dal looking his best. His nails should be trimmed at least monthly. Because his ears flop down, they should be checked regularly'¿your breeder and your veterinarian can suggest a good routine and cleaning materials, and will show you how to care for them. Source

 

Dandie Dinmont Terrier Breed

 

The unique-looking Dandie Dinmont Terrier is a tough but dignified little exterminator. Sturdily built for the rigors of farm life, they will agreeably adapt to city living. Dandies are compact companions blessed with a big personality. Physical hallmarks of the Dandie Dinmont Terrier include a large head covered with profuse, silky white hair; long, hanging ears tipped with feathering and coming almost to a point; big, round eyes full of brightness and expression; and a long, low torso and short legs. The crisp body coat comes in two spicy colors: pepper (bluish black to silvery gray) and mustard (reddish brown to pale fawn). Weighing no more than 24 pounds, Dandies are alert and intelligent watchdogs with a big baritone bark. Dandies enjoy romping and cuddling with kids, but aren't as hyper as some small dogs. They are terriers, though, with typical willfulness, independence, and courage. Dandie owners get best results with positive, motivational training.

Grooming Tips

The Dandie Dinmont Terrier does not shed, but that doesn't mean he requires no grooming. His coat must be stripped of dead hair at least a couple of times a year. This can be done by hand by his breeder, or the owner can learn to do it using a special stripping tool recommended by the breeder. Long hairs can be plucked daily from the coat using thumb and forefinger to maintain a neat appearance. The Dandie will also need to be brushed daily to avoid matting Toenails should be trimmed at least monthly, and care of the ears should be included in maintenance grooming.

 

Danish-Swedish Farmdog Breed

 

Known as the Little Big Dog, the Danish-Swedish Farmdog is a companion dog that loves to work and enjoys a challenge. They are a small, compact and slightly rectangular dog, known to mature late. This breed entered the American Kennel Club Foundation Stock Services Program (AKC FSS) in 2011. They are eligible to compete in Agility, Barn Hunt, Flyball, Herding, Lure Coursing, Nosework, Obedience and Rally, Tracking and AKC FSS Open Shows.   

Grooming Tips:

The Danish-Swedish Farmdog is an easy dog to groom, care for and maintain. Being very low maintenance, the occasional brushing and bath are all that is needed to keep them clean and looking their best. If necessary, their nails can be trimmed with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth can be brushed. Source

 

Deutscher Wachtelhund Breed

 

The Deutscher Wachtelhund has a scenting and blood tracking ability comparable to a Bloodhound and can track 40-hour-old wounded game. On a fresh game trail, it must vocalize to inform hunters of its location. They are a versatile breed, virtually unknown to the German non-hunting public, and are only owned by hunters, gamekeepers, and professional hunters in Germany.

The Deutscher Wachtelhund is a medium-sized, long-haired, very muscular gun dog with a noble head and strong bone. Their keen hunting desire and ability make them an ideal dog for hunters and because of their innate love of water, they are often used to hunt waterfowl. The Deutscher Wachtelhund's name, German quail dog, relates to its ability as an upland bird flusher and is also known as the German Spaniel.           

Grooming Tips

The German Spaniel's coat is short and fine on the head and long on the body, where it is strong, thick, wavy or curly, with enough undercoat to provide protection. It is also well feathered. Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep your dog clean and looking their best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your pet. Their strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

 

Doberman Pinscher

 

Sleek and powerful, possessing both a magnificent physique and keen intelligence, the Doberman Pinscher is one of dogkind's noblemen. This incomparably fearless and vigilant breed stands proudly among the world's finest protection dogs. Dobermans are compactly built dogs'¿muscular, fast, and powerful'¿standing between 24 to 28 inches at the shoulder. The body is sleek but substantial, and is covered with a glistening coat of black, blue, red, or fawn, with rust markings. These elegant qualities, combined with a noble wedge-shaped head and an easy, athletic way of moving, have earned Dobermans a reputation as royalty in the canine kingdom. A well-conditioned Doberman on patrol will deter all but the most foolish intruder.

Grooming Tips:

Although mostly a 'wash and wear' breed, some routine grooming will help to keep the Doberman in optimal condition. A quick going-over daily with a short-bristled brush or a grooming mitt will keep his coat shiny and healthy. He does not need to be bathed often. He should have his nails trimmed at least monthly, and his teeth brushed regularly. The ears should be wiped out carefully every few days'¿a little baby oil on a paper towel is good for this. Your veterinarian can show you how to clean your dog's ears to avoid damage and stay on top of potential issues. Source

 

Dogo Argentino Breed

 

The Dogo Argentino is a pack-hunting dog, bred for the pursuit of big-game such as wild boar and puma, and possesses the strength, intelligence and quick responsiveness of a serious athlete. His short, plain and smooth coat is completely white, but a dark patch near the eye is permitted as long as it doesn't cover more than 10% of the head. The ideal Dogo Argentino is a study in harmony. He is large, powerful, and athletic. His strong head is supported by a thick, but elegant neck that connects to a balanced body, which is sustained by straight, substantial forelegs and very muscular, medium-angulated hindquarters. The Dogo gives the impression of explosive power and energy. Developed to find, chase and catch dangerous game the Dogo must have a good nose, great lung capacity, and a powerful, yet agile, muscular build. His expression is alert and intelligent, with a marked hardness. The Dogo is instantly identifiable by his short, completely white coat.

Grooming:

Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep your dog clean and looking their best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your pet. Their strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly. Source

 

Dogue de Bordeaux Breed

 

The most ancient of French dog breeds, the Dogue de Bordeaux ('Mastiff of Bordeaux') was around even before France was France. These brawny fawn-coated guardians of considerable courage are famously loyal, affectionate, and protective. The Dogue de Bordeaux is an immensely powerful mastiff-type guardian. Males can go 27 inches high and 110 pounds. The short, eye-catching coat is a richly colored fawn. The massive head features a Bulldog-like undershot jaw, expressive eyes, and a deeply furrowed brow. It is, proportionately, the largest head in the canine kingdom. The body is stocky and close to the ground, but Dogues can move like lions when duty calls. DDBs of proper temperament are sweet and sensitive souls. Owners appreciate their breed's loyalty to loved ones of all ages, but also say DDBs can be stubborn and will dominate those who fail to apply firm training in puppyhood. When acquiring such a strapping super-dog, finding a responsible breeder is key.

Grooming:

The breed is well-known for how much they drool, and the wrinkles on their facial area need special attention at least weekly, sometimes daily, to see that they are kept clean and dry. At least once a week it's also important to clean the ears and check for debris or signs of infection. nails should be trimmed monthly. The Dogue de Bordeaux should get a full bath every four weeks or so. In between baths, wiping him down with a damp towel can keep him looking and smelling great. The breed's short coat will shed year 'round; using a rubber curry or a shedding blade can keep the loose hair that falls to the floor to a minimum. Source

 

Drentsche Patrijshond Breed

 

This breed is pronounced da'rinse-ah puh'trice-hoon. The Drentsche Patrijshond, Drent for short, is not your typical continental pointer. For starters, the Drent has a tail and is nearly four hundred years old. The Drent was built by farmers for farmers. As a farm dog, Drents had to do it all: hunt feather and fur, keep the farm clear of vermin, cart dairy to the market and much more. The breed has maintained versatility from the beginning and are highly intelligent and adaptable. As such, training must be kept lively and interesting. Drents are used in all types of hunting, agility, tracking, dog sledding, and skijoring.

The breed developed from pointing dogs originating in Spain (Spioenen) and arrived in The Netherlands via France in the 16th Century. In The Netherlands, these dogs were referred to as Partridge dogs. In the Province of Drenthe, these Partridge dogs were bred among themselves and not mixed with foreign breeds, as occurred elsewhere. Throughout the Drent¿s history, the breed stood on three equally important pillars: versatile hunting dog, farmyard dog, and playmate to the children. It is fundamental to the Drent breed that he hunts all upland game and waterfowl, announces visitors to the home or farm (without showing aggression or fear), and is an excellent family companion.

Grooming Tips

The coat of the Drent is considered the be 'half-long', meaning hair on the body is short of a full curl to nearly flat, but has feathering on the neck, back of all legs, and a brushy tail. Drents have a single coat, similar to a Field-Line Setter or Brittany and shed twice per year.

 Usually, a weekly grooming session will handle everything well, and prevent your Drent from needing to be bathed, unless of course they get into something odorous. The Drent¿s coat is not oily or sebaceous and their coat texture is fine, so the regular brushing serves to keep them dirt and dander free. The ear it the most difficult part of Drent maintenance. You should be prepared to strip off overgrowth so that the natural shape of the ear leather is easy to see. Check ears and nails weekly.

Managing the seasonal change  is generally handled with ease with the proper use of a Mars coat rake, a comb, followed by a pin brush, finished with a boar bristle brush to polish up the coat.

 

Drever Breed

 

The Drever is robust and strong rather than elegant and speedy. They have a proud carriage, well-developed muscles and agile appearance. Affectionate, playful, and sweet, the Drever gets along well with most other breeds and is great in groups. The Drever was developed in the early twentieth century in Sweden. Hunting deer was difficult due to terrain and herd locations so hunters soon realized the benefits of using this short-legged, long-bodied dog to drive the deer over long distances and rough terrain right to them. A keen and even-tempered hound, the Drever is never aggressive, nervous or shy. They are content in most living situations, but tend to be vocal when alerting or at play.

 

Grooming Tips

A Drever's short, coarse hair is easily maintained. Though they do shed some, this dog is truly a "wash-n-wear" breed. The occasional bath will keep them clean and looking their best. If necessary, nails can be trimmed with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth can be brushed.

 

Dutch Shepherd Breed

 

The Dutch Shepherd is a lively, athletic, alert and intelligent breed, and has retained its herding instinct for which it was originally developed. Having an independent nature, it can be slightly obstinate and have a mind of its own. Since its original duties were to keep flocks of sheep in a particular location, it is able to run all day, and that is reflected in its physique and structure. The Dutch Shepherd was discovered as a naturally occurring shepherd's dog living in rural areas. It was developed as an all-purpose farm dog, working originally as a farm guard, drover, and livestock dog. A well known dog fancier wrote about the Dutch Shepherd in 1910: "...bearing a great resemblance to the wolf." Of course this is not entirely true, but it is another aspect that shows that the Dutch Shepherd still has many of the characteristics of its wild forebears. Although it is not a widely known breed, the Dutch Shepherd is a loyal companion and competent working dog used for obedience, dog sports, herding, tracking, search and rescue, and as a police dog.

Grooming Tips

The Dutch Shepherd's coat can be a gold brindle or a silver brindle. There are also three coat types: short-hair, long-hair and rough-hair. The short-hair types will only need occasional brushing. Switch to daily brushing during the seasonal shedding periods in the Spring and Fall. The longhaired dogs will need to be groomed about once per week, or more often than that if their work level and environment requires it. The rough-hair types require a combing once per month and the coat is hand-stripped twice per year. Bathing can be done as-needed. Their nails can be trimmed, if necessary, with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed.

 

English Cocker Spaniel Breed

 

English Cocker Spaniel lovers often use the word 'merry' to describe their breed. Upbeat in the field and mellow at home, this compact, silky-coated bird dog is widely admired for his delightful personality and irresistible good looks.

The English Cocker Spaniel is a compactly built sporting dog standing between 15 to 17 inches at the shoulder. The softly contoured head, with its dark, melting eyes that convey an alert and dignified expression, is framed by lush, close-lying ears. The medium-length coat, seen in a variety of striking colors and patterns, is silky to the touch. 'Balance' is a key word in understanding the breed: The EC is balanced in temperament, construction, and movement. Beneath the EC's physical beauty beats the heart of a tireless, eager-to-please hunter's helper, famous the world over for his ability to flush and retrieve gamebirds. For those who prefer more domestic pursuits, there is no more charming and agreeable household companion.

Grooming Tips

Most English Cockers have a fairly profuse coat that requires regular care, including a thorough brushing and combing at least once a week to keep the dog looking his best and to prevent the formation of mats and tangles. In addition the dog is usually trimmed every month or so in certain areas'¿around the feet, on the face, under the neck, on the underside of the ears, and under the tail. The owner can learn to use scissors, thinning shears or a stripping tool, and clippers to do an overall trim and help keep up the English Cocker's neat appearance. The ears should be checked weekly for debris and excess wax, and the nails should be trimmed at least monthly.

 

English Foxhound Breed

 

The English Foxhound is a substantial galloping hound of great stamina. His long legs are straight as a gatepost, and just as sturdy. The back is perfectly level. And the chest is very deep, 'girthing' as much as 31 inches on a hound measuring 24 inches at the shoulder, ensuring plenty of lung power for a grueling day's hunt. These pack-oriented, scent-driven hounds are gentle and sociable, but rarely seen as house pets. They can be so driven by a primal instinct for pursuit that not much else, including training, matters to them. Owning these noble creatures is best left to huntsmen who kennel packs of hounds or to those experienced in meeting the special challenges of life with swift, powerful hounds hardwired for the chase. The English Foxhound is the epitome of what serious dog breeders strive for: beauty, balance, and utility. The long legs are straight as a gatepost, and just as sturdy. The back is perfectly level. And the chest is very deep, 'girthing' as much as 31 inches on a hound measuring 24 inches at the shoulder, ensuring plenty of lung power for a grueling day's hunt. 'Next to an old Greek statue,' a poet wrote, 'there are few such combinations of grace and strength as in a fine Foxhound.'

Grooming Tips

The English Foxhound's short, hard, dense, and glossy coat requires minimal maintenance. A weekly brushing with a soft-bristle brush or a hound glove will help to remove dirt and loose hair and keep the dog looking his best, and an occasional bath (using a gentle shampoo) can help keep him from having a doggy odor. The ears should be regularly inspected and cleaned if needed with soft gauze and an ear-cleaning solution'¿the dog's breeder or the veterinarian can recommend a good brand to use. The nails should be trimmed often if not worn down naturally, as overly long nails can cause the dog discomfort and problems walking and running.

 

English Setter Breed

 

The English Setter is a medium-sized sporting dog of sweet temper and show-stopping good looks. It is one of the AKC's four British setters created to work on the distinctly different terrains of England, Ireland, and Scotland. English Setters are elegant but solid dogs of beauty and charm. The word 'belton,' unique to the breed, describes the speckled coat patterns of colors that sound good enough to eat: liver, lemon, and orange among them. Under the showy coat is a well-balanced hunter standing about 25 inches at the shoulder. A graceful neck carries a long, oval-shaped head proudly, and dark brown eyes convey a soft expression. The merry English Setter is known as the gentleman of the dog world but is game and boisterous at play. English Setters get on well with other dogs and people. A veteran all-breed dog handler says, 'As a breed to share one's life and living space with, no other breed gives me more pleasure than the English Setter.'

Grooming Tips

To keep their long, silky coats beautiful, English Setters need to be brushed at least once a week with a soft bristle brush. A long-toothed metal dog comb can also come in handy for gently working through areas where tangles may be beginning to form. Left unattended, tangles and mats are uncomfortable for your dog and can cause skin problems to develop. Regular trimming around the face, feet, and other areas can keep your English Setter looking neat. Nails should be trimmed once a month, and a bath every four to six weeks keeps the English Setter's coat and skin clean and healthy.

 

English Springer Spaniel Breed

 

The English Springer Spaniel is a sweet-faced, lovable bird dog of great energy, stamina, and brains. Sport hunters cherish the duality of working Springers: handsome, mannerly pets during the week, and trusty hunting buddies on weekends. Built for long days in the field, English Springer Spaniels are tough, muscular hunters standing 19 to 20 inches at the shoulder and weighing between 40 and 50 pounds. The double coat comes in several colors and patterns, the ears are long and lush, and the kindly, trusting expression of the eyes is a cherished hallmark of the breed. Springers move with a smooth, ground-covering stride. Bred to work closely with humans, Springers are highly trainable people-pleasers. They crave company and are miserable when neglected. Polite dogs, Springers are good with kids and their fellow mammals. They are eager to join in any family activity. Long walks, games of chase and fetch, and swimming are favorite pastimes of these rugged spaniels.

Grooming Tips

Weekly brushing will help to remove dirt and loose hair and keep the Springer's coat healthy, shining, and free of mats. Any tangles can be worked out with a slicker brush or metal dog comb. The Springer can be trimmed by the owner or taken to a professional groomer for clipping and neatening-up of the coat, particularly the feet, the areas around the head and neck, and under the tail. As with all breeds, the nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can be painful to the dog and cause problems walking and running.

 

English Toy Spaniel Breed

 

The merry English Toy Spaniel was bred to be the companion of kings. But ETS are spaniels first and pampered lapdogs second, and beneath the patrician exterior beats the heart of a real doggy dog-bright, loving, and willing to please.

The ETS is a square, snub-nosed toy weighing no more than 14 pounds. The large domed head-with its long and lush ears, dark melting eyes, and chubby cheeks-is a famous breed trait. The profuse coat comes in four varieties, each with its own proper name: red and white (Blenheim); black and tan (King Charles); white, black, and tan (Prince Charles); and a solid red (Ruby). Blenheims often have a red mark, the 'Blenheim Spot,' on top of the head. The ETS, like many toy breeds kept by royals, came to assume the personalities of their aristocratic owners. They can be proud and willful, and extremely discriminating in their choice of friends. With their favored humans, they are affectionate at home and exuberant and curious at play.

Grooming Tips

The English Toy Spaniel's long, wavy, silky, and profuse coat should be brushed at least twice a week with a pin brush or soft bristle brush. A long-toothed metal dog comb can also come in handy for gently working through areas where tangles may be beginning to form. Left unattended, tangles and mats are uncomfortable for your dog and can cause skin problems to develop. Regular trimming around the face, feet, and other areas can keep your English Toy Spaniel looking neat. The nails should be trimmed once a month, and a bath every four to six weeks with a gentle shampoo meant for dogs will help to keep the English Toy's coat and skin clean and healthy. Grooming sessions are a good time to check the dog all over for any new lumps or skin problems, and to check that the eyes and ears are healthy and trouble free.

 

Entlebucher Mountain Dog Breed

 

The Entlebucher Mountain Dog, tricolor 'Laughing Dog' of the Swiss Alps, is a rugged and determined mover of cattle. These spirited, energetic workers and athletes are independent problem solvers and are happiest with a job to perform. Entlebucher (ENT-leh-boo-cur) Mountain Dogs are muscular, long-backed cattle dogs standing from 16 to 21 inches at the shoulder. They have short, sturdy legs; a striking black, white, and tan coat; and an attentive, friendly face. Entles are famous for their agility, balance, and boundless enthusiasm. Entles are vigilant protectors of their four- or two-legged 'herds' and, when properly socialized, make durable and trustworthy playmates for older kids. Energetic Entles require lots of exercise, family time, and direction to reach their full potential. Inexperienced owners might be overwhelmed by this strong, self-confident, go-go herding dog eager for work. Entlebuchers are fine dogs'¿clever, zesty, happy'¿but not for everyone.

Grooming:

The Entlebucher requires minimal grooming overall. With their dense, short, shiny double coat, they will need little more than a wipe-down with a damp towel between baths to stay in optimum appearance. The breed sheds quite a bit, so you may want to invest in a good stripping comb or a thick bristle brush to keep shedding to a minimum. Nails should be trimmed every month to keep them short and neat. Dental care should be started early and maintained on a regular basis throughout your dog's life. Ears should be checked weekly. Cleaning out wax and debris can help avoid the ear infections that plague dogs with drop ears. Source

 

Estrela Mountain Dog Breed

 

The Estrela Mountain Dog is not only an excellent livestock guardian, but is also known for his love of children and family. Proper socialization and training as a puppy is very important so that the dominance in the Estrela's personality does not become aggressive. The Estrela Mountain Dog is named for the Estrela Mountains in Portugal and is believed to be the oldest breed in the region. The breed has several distinctive physical characteristics including rosed ears, a black mask and a hook at the end of its tail. He is an inseparable companion of the shepherd and a faithful flock guardian, bravely protecting it against predators and thieves. A wonderful farm and house guard, he is distrustful towards strangers but typically docile to his master. As a companion in the home, an Estrela will bond for life. He will love and protect his whole family, but a piece of his soul will belong to that one special family member of his choosing. As an Estrela owner tells us: "There is nothing compared to the love of an Estrela."   Breed Contact Details Michelle Tefft michelle@estrelamountaindogusa.com 10279 Sampson Road, Erie, PA 16509 Phone: 814-824-4906

Grooming Tips

The Estrela has a thick outer coat that resembles the texture of goat hair and comes in longhair and shorthair varieties. Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep them clean and looking their best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your pet. Their strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

 

Eurasier Breed

 

The Eurasier is a medium-sized dog with a thick, medium-long coat that can come in a variety of colors. Confident, calm, and well-balanced, he is loyal to the entire family, but reserved towards strangers. He must live in close contact with his family, as he is not suited to be kept in kennels or tied up outside. The Eurasier comes in a beautiful array of colors. All coat colors are permitted as per the breed standard except for liver color, pure white and irregular white patches. Eurasiers can have purple tongues, pink tongues or spotted tongues. They can also have dark face masks or light, so-called reverse masks. Eurasiers are calm, even-tempered, gentle, loving, intelligent and confident.   Club Contact Details United States Eurasier Club Wendy Schuyler Email: USEurasierClub@gmail.com

Grooming Tips

To keep them clean and happy, Eurasiers need a once-a-week to bi-weekly thorough combing/brushing with body checks for burrs or pests; a cleaning of their eyes, ears and a check of their pads; and occasional nail clippings, if needed (especially their dewclaws).They have little body odor and require infrequent bathing. Typically, Eurasiers shed their entire undercoat once or twice a year for a period of about 3 weeks. During undercoat shedding periods, daily combings/brushings are required to minimize picking up 'wool' balls from around the house. If Eurasiers are spayed or neutered their coats can become much thicker, longer and harder to manage.

 

Field Spaniel Breed

 

The sweet and sensitive Field Spaniel is famously docile, but vigorous and game for anything when at play or in the field. These close cousins to Cocker Spaniels and Springer Spaniels may be small in number, but their charm is enormous.

Field Spaniels bear a family resemblance to Cocker, Springer, and Sussex spaniels. The distinctive glossy coat is either black, some shade of liver, or combinations of the two. They stand 17 or 18 inches at the shoulder and should present the picture of well-balanced, moderately proportioned hunting companions. The long, feathery ears frame a facial expression conveying a grave, gentle intelligence. Field Spaniels are sweet, sensitive souls with just enough independence to make life interesting. They are trustworthy with kids, tolerant of their fellow mammals, and responsive to training. The U.S. breed standard calls these tranquil house dogs 'unusually docile,' but they are nonetheless playful and enjoy a good backyard romp.

Grooming Tips

The lovely single coat is one of the breed's most attractive features but requires regular care and maintenance. Weekly brushing and combing will keep the coat shiny and help to reduce shedding. Fields may need minimal trimming about the head and feet. The breed is not to be body clipped as some other spaniels. Their ears should be checked regularly for any signs of infection, and the teeth should be brushed often, using a toothpaste designed for dogs.

 

Finnish Lapphund Breed

 

The weatherproof Finnish Lapphund is a tough and substantial reindeer herder from north of the Arctic Circle. This remarkably empathetic breed is among the friendliest of all dogs'¿once he's satisfied that you aren't a reindeer rustler. Finnish Lapphunds, with their luscious coat, sweet spitz-like face, and profusely coated tail that curves over the back, are instantly recognizable as Nordic dogs. Lappies stand about 20 inches at the shoulder and are surprisingly muscular and substantial for their inches. Quick and agile, they move effortlessly and can go from a trot to a full gallop in a second flat. Lappies are friendly and submissive companions, though a bit wary of strangers. They crave companionship and will be miserable when neglected. A distinctive breed trait is a strong 'startle reflex,' the result of centuries spent ducking the antlers of ornery reindeer. Despite their propensity for shedding and barking, Lappies are popular pets in their homeland.

Grooming Tips

The Finnish Lapphund has a double coat: a smooth outer coat over a soft, dense undercoat. Weekly brushing'¿daily during shedding season'¿will help to remove dirt and loose hair and keep the dog looking his best. Lappies don't have a doggie odor, so an occasional bath is usually sufficient. Lappies should never be shaved, as it reduces their ability to keep cool in warm weather and warm in cold weather. As with all breeds, the nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can be painful to the dog and cause problems walking and running.

 

Finnish Spitz Breed

 

The lively Finnish Spitz, the flame-colored, foxy-faced breed from the 'Land of 60,000 Lakes,' is a small but fearless hunting dog whose unique style of tracking and indicating quarry has earned him the nickname the 'Barking Bird Dog.' The balanced, squarely symmetrical Finnish Spitz will stand not more than 20 inches at the shoulder and are easily recognized by their foxy face and prick ears projecting a lively expression, and a curving plumed tail. Their dense coat of glorious golden-red which is never monochromatic gives them the Finnish Spitz 'Glow.' Finkies or Finns, as they are nicknamed, move with a bold and brisk gait. Finkies make excellent alertdogs, wary but not shy with strangers. This is a vocal breed '¿ in Finland, owners hold contests to crown a 'King Barker' '¿ and true Finn lovers are more delighted than annoyed by their breed's yodeling and range of vocalization. Finkies are eager canine athletes and eye-catching show dogs known to be smart, sensitive, and captivating companions.

Grooming Tips

The Finnish Spitz is a "natural" breed that some owners refer to as "wash and wear." The breed standard is very specific: "No trimming of the coat except for feet is allowed. Whiskers shall not be trimmed. Any alteration of the coat by coloring, dying, trimming, scissoring or other means must be severely faulted." Lightly spraying the coat with water and brushing the coat using a pin brush every two to three days is adequate. Hot blow-drying will dry the outer coat. During their twice-yearly shedding season, daily brushing or a bath followed by a cool-temperature blow-dry and brushing will speed up this process, and a good quality comb and a slicker brush are very useful in getting out the undercoat. The shedding is more severe in an intact female. The coat of a spayed female can become softer and denser and can take more grooming.

 

Flat Coated Retriever Breed

 

The Peter Pan of the Sporting Group, the forever-young Flat-Coated Retriever is a gundog of relatively recent origin. Happy, self-assured, and willing to please, a good Flat-Coat will retrieve a duck or a show ribbon with equal aplomb. The Flat-Coated Retriever's eponymous flat-lying coat comes in lustrous black or liver, with feathering at the legs and tail. A distinctive breed hallmark is the long head'¿unique among retrievers'¿which projects a smart and kindly expression. A Flat-Coat will stand as tall as a Labrador Retriever, but in silhouette they present a leaner, more elegant look. Dogdom's champion tail-waggers, Flat-Coats are among the happiest of all breeds. They mature slowly; some owners say that they never grow up at all, retaining a puppyish taste for rambunctious mischief into old age. This can be either delightful or exasperating, depending on your tolerance for such monkeyshines. This highly energetic breed requires lots of outdoorsy exercise.

Grooming Tips

The Flat-Coat's moderate-length coat requires a weekly grooming with a brush and a metal dog comb to remove dirt and loose hair and keep the dog looking his best. The ears should be regularly inspected and cleaned if needed. The nails should be trimmed often, as overly long nails can cause the dog discomfort and problems walking and running.

 

French Bulldog Breed

 

The one-of-a-kind French Bulldog, with his large bat ears and even disposition, is one of the world's most popular small-dog breeds, especially among city dwellers. The Frenchie is playful, alert, adaptable, and completely irresistible. The French Bulldog resembles a Bulldog in miniature, except for the large, erect 'bat ears' that are the breed's trademark feature. The head is large and square, with heavy wrinkles rolled above the extremely short nose. The body beneath the smooth, brilliant coat is compact and muscular. The bright, affectionate Frenchie is a charmer. Dogs of few words, Frenchies don't bark much'¿but their alertness makes them excellent watchdogs. They happily adapt to life with singles, couples, or families, and do not require a lot of outdoor exercise. They get on well with other animals and enjoy making new friends of the human variety. It is no wonder that city folk from Paris to Peoria swear by this vastly amusing and companionable breed.

Grooming:

The Frenchie's short coat sheds minimally. Weekly brushing with a medium-bristle brush, a rubber grooming mitt or tool, or a hound glove will help to remove shed hair and keep him looking his best. Brushing promotes new hair growth and distributes skin oils throughout the coat to help keep it healthy. A Frenchie's facial folds should be kept clean and dry. The Frenchie's nailsshould be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can cause him pain. Source

 

French Spaniel Breed

 

The sweet and sensitive Field Spaniel is famously docile, but vigorous and game for anything when at play or in the field. These close cousins to Cocker Spaniels and Springer Spaniels may be small in number, but their charm is enormous.

Field Spaniels bear a family resemblance to Cocker, Springer, and Sussex spaniels. The distinctive glossy coat is either black, some shade of liver, or combinations of the two. They stand 17 or 18 inches at the shoulder and should present the picture of well-balanced, moderately proportioned hunting companions. The long, feathery ears frame a facial expression conveying a grave, gentle intelligence. Field Spaniels are sweet, sensitive souls with just enough independence to make life interesting. They are trustworthy with kids, tolerant of their fellow mammals, and responsive to training. The U.S. breed standard calls these tranquil house dogs 'unusually docile,' but they are nonetheless playful and enjoy a good backyard romp.

Grooming Tips

The lovely single coat is one of the breed's most attractive features but requires regular care and maintenance. Weekly brushing and combing will keep the coat shiny and help to reduce shedding. Fields may need minimal trimming about the head and feet. The breed is not to be body clipped as some other spaniels. Their ears should be checked regularly for any signs of infection, and the teeth should be brushed often, using a toothpaste designed for dogs.

 

German Longhaired Pointer Breed

 

A good way to describe the German Longhaired Pointer is that, in appearance, it's Continental Europe's version of a Setter: a pointing dog with full tail and a long coat with dense guard hairs and a moderate undercoat. One noteworthy difference is the GLP's affection for swimming and, therefore, waterfowl hunting. Coat color reflects the mixture of markings similar to a German Shorthaired Pointer.

German Longhaired Pointers are a gun dog and as such, they are expected to search, point, track and retrieve game. They can excel in all types of hunting situations: waterfowl hunting, searching for upland game birds, or retrieving furred game in the woods or prairies, typically rabbit and squirrel in North America. They have a unique ability in being able to switch from a calm household pet to a fiery, passionate hunter. Having been bred for hunting for over a century, they are a superior, tried and tested hunting companion. 

Grooming Tips

The German Longhair requires regular upkeep, especially if he is hunting through various terrain and heavy cover. His long coat attracts burs afield, which may require trimming to remove, and the base of his ears are prone to develop knots. When hunted in heavy cover, his full tail can develop abrasions. Otherwise, the occasional brush and bath will keep him looking his best. His nails can be trimmed, if needed, with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. His ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

 

German Pinscher Breed

 

The sleek, no-frills German Pinscher is among Germany's oldest breeds and the prototype of other pinscher breeds. This energetic, super-intelligent dog was at first used as a rat catcher but can be trained for all types of canine work.

Sleek, shiny, and streamlined, GPs are a true dog lover's delight. They're eye-catching and elegant but in all ways honestly doggy's nothing fussy or exaggerated. They'll stand about knee-high to the average adult. Muscles ripple beneath a shimmering coat of red, black or blue with red accents. There's nobility in the elongated, wedge-shaped head, and the dark eyes are alert and eager. GPs move with the kind of strong, free-and-easy gait that tells you this is a confident companion, up for anything the day might bring.

Grooming:

The German Pinscher's short, dense coat needs little maintenance. Weekly grooming with a brush and an occasional bath will keep him shiny and looking his best. As with all breeds, his nails should be trimmed monthly if not worn down naturally, as overly long nails can be painful and cause problems walking and running. His ears should be checked weekly and cleaned if needed of any dirt or excess wax. Source

 

German Shepherd Dog Breed

 

Generally considered dogkind's finest all-purpose worker, the German Shepherd Dog is a large, agile, muscular dog of noble character and high intelligence. Loyal, confident, courageous, and steady, the German Shepherd is truly a dog lover's delight. German Shepherd Dogs can stand as high as 26 inches at the shoulder and, when viewed in outline, presents a picture of smooth, graceful curves rather than angles. The natural gait is a free-and-easy trot, but they can turn it up a notch or two and reach great speeds. There are many reasons why German Shepherds stand in the front rank of canine royalty, but experts say their defining attribute is character: loyalty, courage, confidence, the ability to learn commands for many tasks, and the willingness to put their life on the line in defense of loved ones. German Shepherds will be gentle family pets and steadfast guardians, but, the breed standard says, there's a 'certain aloofness that does not lend itself to immediate and indiscriminate friendships.'

Grooming Tips

The German Shepherd Dog has a medium-length, double coat consisting of a dense, harsh, and close-lying outer coat with a softer undercoat. The breed is easy to maintain, usually requiring just a quick brushing every few days or so to help remove loose hairs, but they do shed more profusely once or twice a year. During these periods, more frequent brushing will help control the amount of hair that ends up around the house and on the furniture. The German Shepherd only needs an occasional bath. It is important to trim or grind his nails every month if they are not worn down naturally, as overly long nails can cause pain and structural issues.

 

German Shorthaired Pointer Breed

 

The versatile, medium-sized German Shorthaired Pointer is an enthusiastic gundog of all trades who thrives on vigorous exercise, positive training, and a lot of love. GSP people call their aristocratic companions the 'perfect pointer.' Male German Shorthaired Pointers stand between 23 and 25 inches at the shoulder and weigh anywhere from 55 to 70 pounds; females run smaller. The coat is solid liver (a reddish brown), or liver and white in distinctive patterns. The dark eyes shine with enthusiasm and friendliness. Built to work long days in the field or at the lake, GSPs are known for power, speed, agility, and endurance. 'Noble' and 'aristocratic' are words often used to describe the overall look. GSPs make happy, trainable pets who bond firmly to their family. They are always up for physical activities like running, swimming, organized dog sports'¿in fact, anything that will burn some of their boundless energy while spending outdoors time with a human buddy.

Grooming:

The GSPs coat is easy to groom most of the year, requiring only a good once-over with a brush or grooming glove every few days. Although the coat is short, it still sheds'¿especially at certain times of the year, when more frequent brushing will be needed to remove the loose hairs before they end up all over the house. The hairs can become embedded in fabrics and carpet and hard to get out. An occasional bath (using a gentle shampoo) can help. The ears should be regularly inspected and cleaned, and the nails trimmed short. Source

 

German Spitz Breed

 

The German Spitz is always attentive, lively and exceptionally devoted to his owner. He is very teachable and easy to train. His distrust towards strangers and lack of hunting instinct make him the ideal watchdog for the home. His indifference to weather, robustness and longevity are his most outstanding attributes.

Spitz breeds like the German Spitz are captivating on account of their beautiful coats, made to stand off by a plentiful undercoat. Particularly impressive is his strong, mane-like collar around his neck, called a ruff, and the bushy tail carried boldly over his back. His foxy head, alert eyes, and small, pointed, closely-set ears give the German Spitz his unique cheeky appearance. The Large German Spitz comes in white, black or brown. The toy and medium German Spitz come in a variety of colors including white, black, brown, orange, grey-shaded and other colors. Though easily trainable, this lively and intelligent breed can also have an independent streak. If properly trained (so as not to be too noisy) and well socialized, the German Spitz will be happy mingling with other people and dogs. Source

The German Spitz is one of the oldest dog breeds originating from Europe. Attentive, energetic, and devoted, these pups have some of the best qualities among any dog breed around. Source

Grooming Tips:

Brushing: Owners will need either a pin or slicker brush and a 2-in-1 comb. First, starting at the shoulders go over the entire coat with the brush, moving against the direction of hair growth. Repeat with the comb, and use it to work out any mats or tangles. During shedding season, you can also go through the coat with a shedding rake to help remove any dead hairs from the undercoat.

Bathing: First give the dog a thorough brushing, then wet the entire coat. Using canine shampoo, lather well, then rinse completely. Repeat with conditioner if desired. Towel- and/or blow-dry, then finish with another quick brush-through to make the coat look neat and clean.

Haircuts: For this type of grooming, German Spitz dogs are best in the hands of professionals--and most groomers will tell owners not to shave or clip their Spitzes. Dogs of this breed type have naturally insulated coats that keep them cool in summer and warm in winter, and clipping a Spitz coat will permanently ruin this insulation. Even so, some owners still choose to give their German Spitz a haircut, and a few styles are described in the Styling & Haircuts section of this page. Source

 

German Wirehaired Pointer Breed

 

With his sporty weatherproof coat and can-do attitude, the noble German Wirehaired Pointer is a versatile, sturdy gundog who thrives on outdoor activity. Around the house, the GWP is an eager, affectionate, and amusing family companion. Standing as high as 26 inches at the shoulder, GWPs are a bit taller and heavier than their close relative, the German Shorthaired Pointer. GWPs are balanced, well muscled, resilient, agile, and generally built to beat the bushes all day long without tiring. The harsh wire coat protects against thorny underbrush and foul weather, and the shaggy beard and eyebrows complete an intelligent, worldly expression. 'The need for running in the great outdoors is a must!' says one veteran owner. 'This breed will not be happy to be on the couch all day.' GWPs are bright and eager, but their independent, inquisitive nature might frustrate novice owners. A good fit for those looking for a loving companion who enjoys sports and togetherness.

Grooming Tips

The German Wirehaired Pointer's harsh, wiry coat requires minimal maintenance. A weekly grooming with a comb and soft slicker brush will help to remove dirt and loose hair and keep the dog looking his best. The earsshould be regularly inspected and cleaned if needed with soft gauze and an ear-cleaning solution'¿the dog's veterinarian can recommend a good brand to use. The nails should be trimmed often, as overly long nails can cause the dog discomfort and problems walking and running.

 

Giant Schnauzer Breed

 

The Giant Schnauzer is a larger and more powerful version of the Standard Schnauzer, and he should, as the breed standard says, "be a bold and valiant figure of a dog." Great intelligence and loyalty make him a stellar worker and companion.

A well-bred Giant Schnauzer closely resembles the Standard Schnauzer, only bigger. As their name suggests, Giants are imposing. A male might stand as high as 27.5 inches at the shoulder and weigh 95 pounds. The muscular, substantial body is, as the breed's fanciers put it, a "bold and valiant figure of a dog." The double coat is either solid black or "pepper and salt." Familiar characteristics of the Mini, Standard, and Giant are a harsh beard and eyebrows, accentuating a keen, sagacious expression.

Grooming Tips

The Giant Schnauzer has a dense, wiry, weather-resistant double coat consisting of a soft undercoat and a harsh outer coat. The Giant must be brushed weekly, and clipped or stripped regularly to maintain a healthy and attractive coat. The owner should be prepared to spend time maintaining the coat or plan to have the dog periodically groomed by the breeder or someone whom the breeder recommends. The Giant's ears should be checked regularly for signs of infection, and the teeth should be brushed often, using a toothpaste formulated for dogs.

 

Glen of Imaal Terrier Breed

 

Gentler, less excitable than most terriers, but still bold and spirited, the double-coated Glen of Imaal Terrier is named for one of Ireland's most remote locales. The brave but docile Glen is a strong, no-fuss dog built for hard work. Glens are scruffy, sturdy, low-slung terriers standing no more than 14 inches at the shoulder. There's nothing fancy or fussed-over about Glens. Rather, their wiry no-frills coat, broad head, and bowed front legs suggest a working farm dog from a time and place where substance was more important than style. And yet, they're also ridiculously cute. It takes a heart of stone to resist reaching down to give a Glen a scratch behind the ear and a pat on the well-muscled rump.

Grooming Tips

The Glen of Imaal Terrier's weather-resistant double coat, consisting of a rough outer coat and a soft undercoat, requires moderate brushing weekly to prevent matting of the furnishings (the soft hair around the ears, neck, legs and belly) and should also be stripped two or three times a year. They shed very little as a result of this effort. It does not take a great amount of time, and the bonding you achieve with your pup is well worth the time involved. Since Glens are a dwarf breed, a small but sturdy grooming table is a very good investment. It will make the process much easier on both of you. The nails should be trimmed regularly, and the ears checked weekly for debris or excess wax buildup.

 

Golden Retriever Breed

 

The Golden Retriever, an exuberant Scottish gundog of great beauty, stands among America's most popular dog breeds. They are serious workers at hunting and field work, as guides for the blind, and in search-and-rescue, enjoy obedience and other competitive events, and have an endearing love of life when not at work. The Golden Retriever is a sturdy, muscular dog of medium size, famous for the dense, lustrous coat of gold that gives the breed its name. The broad head, with its friendly and intelligent eyes, short ears, and straight muzzle, is a breed hallmark. In motion, Goldens move with a smooth, powerful gait, and the feathery tail is carried, as breed fanciers say, with a 'merry action.' The most complete records of the development of the Golden Retriever are included in the record books that were kept from 1835 until about 1890 by the gamekeepers at the Guisachan (pronounced Gooeesicun) estate of Lord Tweedmouth at Inverness-Shire, Scotland. These records were released to public notice in Country Life in 1952, when Lord Tweedmouth's great-nephew, the sixth Earl of Ilchester, historian and sportsman, published material that had been left by his ancestor. They provided factual confirmation to the stories that had been handed down through generations. Goldens are outgoing, trustworthy, and eager-to-please family dogs, and relatively easy to train. They take a joyous and playful approach to life and maintain this puppyish behavior into adulthood. These energetic, powerful gundogs enjoy outdoor play. For a breed built to retrieve waterfowl for hours on end, swimming and fetching are natural pastimes.

Grooming Tips

Goldens heavily shed their thick, water-repellant double coat once or twice a year, and they also shed more moderately on a continuous basis. Most of the time, a good brushing-out with a slicker brush once or twice a week will remove much of the dead hair before it has a chance to fall onto the furniture. During times of heavy shedding, these brushing sessions turn into daily affairs. Baths help to loosen the dead hairs, but the dog must be completely dry before brushing begins. Otherwise, Goldens only need occasional baths to keep them clean. As with all breeds, the Golden's nails should be trimmed regularly.

 

Goldendoodle (Golden Retriever + Poodle) Breed

 

The Golden Retriever, an exuberant Scottish gundog of great beauty, stands among America's most popular dog breeds. They are serious workers at hunting and field work, as guides for the blind, and in search-and-rescue, enjoy obedience and other competitive events, and have an endearing love of life when not at work. The Golden Retriever is a sturdy, muscular dog of medium size, famous for the dense, lustrous coat of gold that gives the breed its name. The broad head, with its friendly and intelligent eyes, short ears, and straight muzzle, is a breed hallmark. In motion, Goldens move with a smooth, powerful gait, and the feathery tail is carried, as breed fanciers say, with a 'merry action.' The most complete records of the development of the Golden Retriever are included in the record books that were kept from 1835 until about 1890 by the gamekeepers at the Guisachan (pronounced Gooeesicun) estate of Lord Tweedmouth at Inverness-Shire, Scotland. These records were released to public notice in Country Life in 1952, when Lord Tweedmouth's great-nephew, the sixth Earl of Ilchester, historian and sportsman, published material that had been left by his ancestor. They provided factual confirmation to the stories that had been handed down through generations. Goldens are outgoing, trustworthy, and eager-to-please family dogs, and relatively easy to train. They take a joyous and playful approach to life and maintain this puppyish behavior into adulthood. These energetic, powerful gundogs enjoy outdoor play. For a breed built to retrieve waterfowl for hours on end, swimming and fetching are natural pastimes.

Grooming Tips

Goldendoodle grooming style highly depends on the coat inherited by your dog. Both coat types need frequent brushing. To prevent matting, the thicker coat from the Poodle requires brushing on a daily basis. If your Goldendoodle happens to be active in swimming, ensure to check the dog's ears regularly for any signs of infection. Since the hair from the Poodle breed grows continuously, haircuts would be required approximately every 10 weeks.

Although Goldendoodles are referred to as light-or non-shedders, these designer dog breeds still require grooming to maintain a superb shape of their coat. This highly depends on the coat inherited by your dog. Both coat types need frequent brushing. To prevent matting, the thicker coat from the Poodle with require brushing on a daily basis. To enhance the easy maintenance of these dogs, most people that own the Goldendoodle opt to clip their coats. Even after clipping, the dog will still need brushing every few weeks. Bathing the Goldendoodle should only be done when it's necessary using a shampoo recommended by your vet. Frequent bathing has the possibility of eventually making the dog's skin lose the much-needed moisture and oils that keep your dog's skin healthy. 

Since the coats from the Golden Retriever and Poodle grow continuously, haircuts would be required approximately every 10 weeks. Ensure the teeth are brushed and nails are trimmed when you take your dog to the groomer. In order to prevent Periodontal disease, you can brush the dog's teeth once a week. Daily brushing of your dog's teeth will even be better as it prevents bad breath and gum disease. To ensure your Goldendoodle gets used to grooming routines, start doing it as early as possible. If your Goldendoodle happens to be active in swimming, ensure to check ears regularly for any signs of infection.

If your dog fails to wear its nails off naturally, ensure to trim them once or twice a month. This helps to prevent painful tears as well as other problems. Checking the nails is easy, and you just need to observe and see if they are clicking on the floor. While trimming the nails, ensure not to cut too far, since Dog toenails have blood vessels in them, and they could easily bleed if not well taken care of. This could also make the dog fear and evade when you get the clippers to cut his nails. Just get some pointers from the groomer or vet if you don't know how to go about this.

Ensure to check the ears of your Goldendoodle weekly for any odor or redness which are common signs of infected ears. Whenever you make any checks on the ears, ensure to wipe them out using a small cotton ball that has been damped with a PH-balanced, gentle ear cleaner to prevent your dog's ears from any infections. Endeavor not to insert anything into the dog's ear canal, just wipe the external part of the ear.

Gordon Setter Breed

 

The Gordon Setter, the black avenger of the Highlands, is a substantial bird dog named for a Scottish aristocrat. Athletic and outdoorsy, Gordons are bold, confident, and resolute in the field, and sweetly affectionate by the fireside. Gordons are the largest and most substantial of setters'¿a big male might stand 27 inches at the shoulder and weigh 80 pounds. The stunning coat is a glistening black, with tan markings and long hair on the ears, belly, legs, chest, and tail. Tan spots above the bright brown eyes point up a wise and willing expression. Like other Scots breeds, from the compact Scottish Terrier to the majestic Scottish Deerhound, Gordons were built to withstand their homeland's tough terrain and foul weather.

Grooming Tips

Brushing at least weekly is essential to prevent matting. Shedding is minimal if the dog is brushed regularly. Monthly grooming recommended for health includes trimming the hair on the feet, trimming the nails, trimming inside and around the ears, trimming around the vent/tail area, and checking the teeth for plaque. Bathing monthly is recommended. Dry skin and dandruff can be prevented with bathing and conditioning.

Grand Basset Griffon Vendeen Breed

 

The Grand Basset Griffon Vendéen is a French scenthound. Somewhat active and never high-strung, yet GBGVs are busy dogs who don't tire easily. First, let's deal with the name. Roughly translated, it means 'Large, low, shaggy dog of the Vendée' and is pronounced 'Grand-Bah-SAY Gree-FOHN VON-day-uhn.' Now, let's have a look at the dog: He's a sweet-faced, long-eared fellow in a shaggy coat whose mustache, beard, and profuse eyebrows suggest the look of a worldly but amiable Frenchman. Beneath the Grand's Old World charm is a rugged, sturdily-built bruiser who is deceptively quick and light-footed. The stamina and courage of these longer-than-tall hunters is the stuff of Gallic legend.

Grooming Tips

The Grand Basset Griffon Vendéen requires only a weekly brushing with a slicker brush and comb. Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep him clean and looking his best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your pet. Their strong fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

 

Great Dane Breed

 

The easygoing Great Dane, the mighty "Apollo of Dogs," is a total joy to live with, but owning a dog of such imposing size, weight, and strength is a commitment not to be entered into lightly. This breed is indeed great, but not a Dane.

As tall as 32 inches at the shoulder, Danes tower over most other dogs and when standing on their hind legs, they are taller than most people. These powerful giants are the picture of elegance and balance, with the smooth and easy stride of born noblemen. The coat comes in different colors and patterns, perhaps the best-known being the black-and-white patchwork pattern known as "harlequin." Despite their sweet nature, Danes are alert home guardians. Just the sight of these gentle giants is usually enough to make intruders think twice. But those foolish enough to mistake the breed's friendliness for softness will meet a powerful foe of true courage and spirit. Patient with kids, Danes are people pleasers who make friends easily.

Grooming Tips

For most of the year the Great Dane's short, smooth coat doesn't shed much, but given the size of the dog, this can still amount to a fair bit of hair. Weekly brushing with a medium-bristle brush, a rubber grooming mitt or tool, or a hound glove will help keep shedding to a minimum. During shedding season once or twice a year, however, hair loss will be more profuse, with a daily brushing ideal. Great Danes need a bath only occasionally, unless they get into something messy. As with all breeds, the Great Dane's nails should be trimmed regularly, because overly long nails can cause the dog pain as well as problems walking and running. Source

Great Pyrenees Breed

 

The Great Pyrenees is a large, thickly coated, and immensely powerful working dog bred to deter sheep-stealing wolves and other predators on snowy mountaintops. Pyrs today are mellow companions and vigilant guardians of home and family. Frequently described as 'majestic,' Pyrs are big, immensely strong mountain dogs standing as high as 32 inches at the shoulder and often tipping the scales at more than 100 pounds. These steadfast guardians usually exhibit a Zen-like calm, but they can quickly spring into action and move with grace and speed to meet a threat. The lush weatherproof coat is all white, or white with markings of beautiful shades of gray, tan, reddish-brown, or badger

Grooming Tips

For all their abundant fur, Pyrs don't require a lot of grooming, as their coat is dirt- and tangle-resistant. They have a double coat, with a long outer coat and a soft undercoat. They will shed this undercoat with great enthusiasm'¿'leading to a snowstorm,' one owner says. She laughs, 'They shed in the spring, after whelping, in honor of certain Druid festivals, and after you enter them in a show!' A thorough brushing with a pin brush or slicker brush at least once a week will help to reduce the shed hair that ends up all over the house. The Pyr's nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can cause the dog discomfort. The teeth should be brushed often, using a toothpaste designed for dogs.

Greater Swiss Mountain Dog Breed

 

The Greater Swiss Mountain Dog is a large, immensely strong worker famous for a dense coat of striking black, red, and white markings. Dependable and faithful Swissies earned their feed as herders, drafters, and all-around pasture dogs.

Greater than what? Well, standing as high as 28.5 inches and weighing as much as a midsize human, a Greater Swiss might easily be greater than you. Swissies are immensely strong, yet agile enough to move a flock across the sloping foot of a mountain. The coat is a striking tricolor, black, red, and white. The head and muzzle typically have a white marking (the "blaze"), setting off a sweet expression. Several big mountain-dog breeds are described as majestic, but Swissies practically invented the word.

Grooming Tips

This is basically a 'wash and wear' breed, but they are double coated and do blow their undercoat, usually twice a year. When this is occurring they benefit from a good bath and blow-out, followed by a thorough brushing with a rake or shedding tool. For the rest of the year the occasional bath and brushing usually does the trick. They need regular nail-trims and ear and teeth cleaning. Source

Greyhound Breed

 

The coat is short and smooth and easy to maintain. The coat comes in a wide variety of colors including white, fawn, red, gray and brindle. The greyhound has virtually no body fat, and guardians must be certain to provide the dog with soft places to rest, or pressure sores can easily develop. Source
Greyhounds are graceful, lanky, and sweet-tempered dogs that are beloved for their tender demeanor and sleepy personalities. When they are not cuddling on the couch, these hunting hounds love long walks and chasing after squirrels that catch their eye. Greyhounds' history as racing dogs belies the fact that they enjoy the slow lane comforts of life and make excellent family pets. Source
Grooming Tips:

1. Brushing: Greyhounds shed their short hair quite a bit, so owners who want to keep a tidy house free of loose Greyhound hairs should brush them daily with a firm rubber bristle brush to remove dead hair and manage shedding. If shedding does not bother you, your Greyhound will only need to be brushed occasionally to keep his coat looking healthy and stimulate hair growth.
2. Bathing: Greyhound adhere to the general rule of dog bathing: about once every three months. The coat should end up fresh smelling, shiny, with no loose or shedding hair. First give the dog a good brushing to remove dead hair and mats. Place a rubber mat in the tub to provide secure footing and fill the tub with three to four inches of lukewarm water. Use a spray hose, pitcher or unbreakable cup to wet the dog, taking caution to avoid getting water in the eyes, ears and nose. Massage in pet shampoo, saving the head for last. Immediately rinse thoroughly, starting with the head to prevent soap from dripping into the eyes. Towel dry. Wipe wrinkled breeds with a soft cloth and make sure they are totally dry after bathing.
3. Hair Clipping: Provide your dog with plenty of positive reinforcement and even treats to help associate nail clipping with a positive experience. As you start to clip, gently press on your dog’s paws to help him become accustomed to the feeling of having his nails clipped. Then, work gradually, shaving down just a thin portion of the nail at first to make sure you don’t reach the quick. Clip one nail, reward your dog with a treat, and stop to give him some positive reinforcement before moving on. Gradually increase the number of nails you clip in one sitting to help your dog get used to the process. Never trim extremely long nails down to a short nail in one sitting, because this is an excellent way to accidently quick the dog’s nail. Instead, work gradually, shaving small portions of your dog’s nails off each time.
4. Eyes / Ears: Check their floppy ears weekly for infection and loose hair.
5. Teeth: Make sure to brush their teeth at least three times a week. They have weak teeth that can lead to poor dental health, so frequent brushing will help prevent discomfort and help their breath stay fresh.

 

Hamiltonstovare Breed

 

The Hamiltonstovare is a versatile scent hound, bred to hunt hare and fox in Sweden. When not hunting, they can be found in the show ring, as their striking color makes them a stunning show dog. Hamiltons have been used as service dogs in America since the late 90's, where their versatility and close bond with their people shine.

Hamiltonstovare are most commonly multi-purpose dogs; they are hunters, show dogs, and pets, all in one regal and versatile little package. As a hound, they follow their nose wherever it goes (and will not return for a good long while), so leashes and fences are a necessity with this breed. Unlike most scent hounds though, the Hamiltonstovare has an extremely high prey drive for both scent and sight. They can make excellent lure coursing dogs. In the home, they are a lazy, low maintenance dog who rarely sheds. Very food motivated, they can be easy to train despite their hound stubbornness, but higher competitive obedience levels are not usually an option. The only major problem with this breed is accessibility; there is only one breeder of Hamiltonstovare in the United States. Unfortunately, Hamiltonstovare have a rescue problem in the US as well, and some can be found in rural shelters in Virginia, North Carolina, West Virginia, Kentucky, South Carolina and Tennessee

Grooming:

Hamiltons require very little grooming and are very easy to keep clean. They are seasonal shedders that only shed low to moderately in the spring and fall. Hamiltonstovare also do not drool and rarely have a doggy odor. A bath once a month and proper nail and dental care are all that are required to keep them looking their best. Source

Hanoverian Scenthound Breed

 

The Hanoverian Scenthound has a calm and assured temperament, at the same time sensitive with his handler, and choosy and discerning with strangers. He has high capabilities of concentration in any tracking work with strong loyalty to the hunter in charge.

Hailing from Germany, the Hanoverian Scenthound is the Hannoverscher Schweihund in its native language. In general appearance, the highly efficient Hanoverian is of medium-large size, well proportioned and powerful. Well set strongly muscled fore and hind limbs qualify him for tireless work. His broad, deep chest provides ample room for the lungs and enables long, strenuous chases. The slightly wrinkled forehead and the clear, dark eyes produce the serious expression typical of the Hanoverian Scenthound. Also typical for the breed is the red primary color of the coat, which can vary from a pale fawn color to a dark brindle, appearing almost black.

Grooming:

The Hanoverian Scenthound's grooming requirements are quite low. He has a short coat which will rarely require brushing and he should be bathed as rarely as possible. The ears of the Hanoverian Scenthound, however, should be regularly checked for signs of infection or irritation. His nails need regular clipping and his teeth should be brushed when needed. Source

Harrier Breed

 

The Harrier is a swift, prey-driven pack hound of medium size first bred in medieval England to chase the hare. Outgoing and friendly, the Harrier is much larger than the Beagle but smaller than another close relative, the English Foxhound.

Somewhat resembling a Beagle with a gym membership, Harriers are larger, more powerful hounds than their diminutive cousin' but smaller than the English Foxhound, a breed used in their development. Standing between 19 and 21 inches at the shoulder, Harriers have the timeless look of a working pack hound: a short, smart-looking coat; low-set, velvety ears; an irresistibly sweet face; and enough muscle and sinew to endure a long day's hunt. A well-built Harrier will cover the ground with a smooth, efficient gait.

Grooming Tips

The Harrier's short, glossy coat requires minimal maintenance. A weekly brushing with a soft-bristle brush or a hound glove will help to remove dirt and loose hair and keep the dog looking his best, and an occasional bath(using a gentle shampoo) can help keep him from having a doggy odor. The ears should be regularly inspected and cleaned if needed with soft gauze and an ear-cleaning solution'¿the dog's breeder or the veterinarian can recommend a good brand to use. The nails should be trimmed often if not worn down naturally, as overly long nails can cause the dog discomfort and problems walking and running.

Havanese Breed

 

Havanese, the only dog breed native to Cuba, are cheerful little dogs with a spring in their step and a gleam in their big, brown eyes. These vivacious and sociable companions are becoming especially popular with American city dwellers. ¿Distinctive features of the Havanese include a curled-over tail and a gorgeous silky coat, which comes in a variety of colors. Some owners enjoy cording the coat, in the manner of a Puli, and others clip it short to reduce grooming time. Happily, Havenese are just as cute no matter what hairdo you give them. Their small but sturdy bodies, adaptable nature, and social skills make Havanese an ideal city dog, but they are content to be anywhere that they can command the attention of admirers young and old alike. Havanese, smart and trainable extroverts with the comic instincts of a born clown, are natural trick dogs. Havanese are also excellent watchdogs and take the job seriously, but will usually keep the barking to a minimum.

Grooming Tips

The long, soft, and silky coat of the Havanese needs to be groomed daily to be kept free of mats and tangles. This can be done by gently running a comb or soft brush over the dog while he is on your lap. Pet owners often choose to have their dog's coat clipped to a short trim to reduce grooming time. The Havanese should also be bathed occasionally as needed. The corners of the eyes should be gently cleaned daily to prevent tear-stain of the lighter-colored hair in the area. Check the ears often to remove excess wax or accumulated debris, and wipe out the inside of the ear-flap with a slightly moistened gauze or paper towel.

Hokkaido Breed

 

The Hokkaido is a dog of noteworthy endurance and dignity. His temperament is faithful, docile, very alert and bold. He also shows accurate judgement and great stamina.

The Hokkaido is a medium-sized, strongly-built dog. They have longer, thicker coats than the other Japanese breeds, and also have wider chests and smaller ears. Like all the Nihon Ken, they have a double coat made up of protective, coarse outer guard hairs, and a fine, thick undercoat that is shed seasonally. The breed comes in several colors: white, red, black, brindle, sesame, and wolf grey. With early training, the Hokkaido is a very loyal and dedicated companion who wants to please his human family. They are incredibly intelligent thinkers and problem solvers, and they excel at tasks given to them. If not socialized properly, however, Hokkaido can become wary of strangers and protective of their families. The breed is extremely rare outside its native country. In Japan, there is an estimated population of around 10,000-12,000, and yearly registrations of between 900-1000.

Grooming Tips

The Hokkaido is a fairly self-managed breed. The natural oils on their skin and coat help to keep them clean and dry despite unfavorable weather conditions. No trimming or shaving of their fur is required or recommended, just regular brushing to remove dead fur and keep the coat healthy. Hokkaido blow their undercoat roughly twice yearly. During this time, a bath and frequent brushing to remove the dead fur is necessary. Their nails should be trimmed regularly to avoid overgrowth and cracking. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

Hovawart Breed

 

The Hovawart is a medium-temperament working dog with versatile usage and has a very good nose. He is kind, has an even disposition and protective instinct, is self-confident and has the ability to take stress. His balanced body proportions and special devotion to his family make him an outstanding companion, watch, guard, tracking and rescue-dog. Physically, Hovawarts are large, heavy-boned dogs that have been bred to be intelligent guardians of livestock and the home. They come in three colors: blonde, black and tan, and black. They are alert, faithful, trustworthy, extremely intelligent, fun-loving, and stubborn. A Hovawart likes to have a job to do, or he will use his creative nature to find one. They take approximately two years to mature. Currently, Hovawarts in North America are participating in search and rescue organizations, therapy dog activities, obedience trials, agility trials, flyball and service dog training. Owning a Hovawart can be quite a challenge, and they require significant time and attention from their owners, so they are not recommended for first-time dog owners. However, for an owner who is willing to expend the effort to teach their dog appropriate behaviors in different situations, the reward is a faithful companion. The Hovawart is a family dog. It develops a strong bond to its 'pack' and must be a part of the family life; it needs to bond closely with the owner/family. If it has been well integrated into the family, it does not mind spending the occasional hour in a kennel. Club Contact Details Hovawart Club of North America info@hovawartclub.org

Grooming Tips

Because the Hovawart does not have much of an undercoat, it does not need much grooming. Apart from the period of shedding, an occasional brushing will suffice. Beyond this, the occasional bath will keep them clean and looking their best. Their strong fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

Ibizan Hound Breed

 

The Ibizan Hound is a lithe and leggy visitor from the dawn of civilization, bred as a rabbit courser on the rocky shores of Spain's Balearic Islands. World-class sprinters and leapers, Ibizans need ample space to air out their engines.

Ibizans are lithe and leggy visitors from the dawn of civilization. Art history students will recognize the elongated head, with its large erect ears, as a familiar motif of ancient Egypt. The elegant, racy body stands 22.5 to 27.5 inches at the shoulder, with coat colors of solid red or white, or red and white patterns. The rosy-colored leathers of the nose, eye rims, and lips, along with amber or caramel eyes, perfectly complement the coat. The breed's quiet grace is often described as deer-like.

Grooming Tips

Ibizan coats come in smooth and wire varieties, with a wide range in how profuse the wire coat can be. Both varieties should be groomed upright earsshould be checked weekly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which could result in an infection. The teeth should be brushed often, daily if possible, using a toothpaste formulated for dogs.

Icelandic Sheepdog Breed

 

The Icelandic Sheepdog, Iceland's only native dog breed, is a charmingly friendly and faithful all-around herder of small-to-medium size. A densely coated Nordic spitz-type breed, Icelandics are enthusiastically devoted to their humans.

Icelandics are one of the 50 or so northern breeds from around the world classified as spitzes. The breed's "spitziness" is expressed by a dense coat, foxy face, pointed ears, and a bushy, curling tail. Icelandics, standing no higher than 18 inches at the shoulder, are just under what we'd consider medium sized. They come in several predominant colors, always accompanied by white markings. An endearing trait is the facial expression: friendly, happy, always looking as though there's no place they'd rather be than with you.

Grooming Tips

The Icelandic Sheepdog has a profuse double coat, with a longer outer coat and a dense undercoat. Icelandic Sheepdogs shed a fair amount, even more so during shedding season, which occurs twice a year. Weekly brushing'¿daily during shedding season'¿will help to remove dirt and loose hair and keep the dog looking his best. Any tangles can be worked out with a slicker brush or metal comb. As with all breeds, the nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can be painful to the dog.

Irish Doodle (Irish Setter + Poodle) Breed

 

The Irish Doodle is a medium-size crossbreed dog that was developed between the Irish Setter and the standard Poodle. The offspring usually inherits the light-hearted, friendly nature of the Irish setter and the non shedding coat of the Poodle. These dogs have a tidy look, with a long coat and an elongated face ending in a brown to black muzzle, and with ears hanging close to their round eyes. Apricot is the commonest coat color of these dogs.

Temperament and Behavior

These dogs are loving and affectionate, and are characterized by loyalty and devotion. They are eager to please and have significant native intelligence inherited from their parents. It is their intelligent mind and careful disposition that have made them equally good with kids and other family pets. This makes them an excellent family dog ideal for apartment life. Not do they just love the members of their families, but they are also comfortable meeting strangers.

These dogs, especially the puppies, love attention until they’re well along in years. Though, it is alert and attentive. If it happens to come across anything suspicious, it would immediately alert its family.

Grooming Tips

the Irish doodles practically do not shed. Hence, it is pretty much easy to groom them. Simply brush their coat with a solid bristle brush at least twice a week. Bathing and dry-shampooing is advisable when your dog is dirty, or in need for one. These long-eared dogs need your attention to maintain their ear hygiene. Clean their ears when dirty.

Irish Red and White Setter Breed

 

The rollicking Irish Red and White Setter is an athletic medium-sized bird dog bred primarily for hunting. Fun-loving, friendly, and high-spirited, Irish Red and Whites are a bit shorter and stockier than their cousin the Irish Setter.

Sportsmen thrill at the sight of a noble Red and White frozen on point, motionless as a statue. These medium-to-large bird dogs are powerful, solid, and sinewy, with enough stamina and bird sense to get the job done any day of the week and twice on Sunday. The stunning coat, vivid red islands floating on a sea of pearl white, has a practical function: It enables hunters to spot their dog at a distance. The handsome face projects a keen but kindly expression.

Grooming Tips

Grooming the Irish Red and White Setter is a fairly simple job. It is important that the breed look as natural as possible, although scissors or clippers might be used to tidy up the rough edges just for the sake of neatness. An all-over grooming once a week with a soft brush and a slicker or comb to eliminate any tangles will keep the dog looking his best. The ears should be checked weekly for any excess wax and debris. A bath every month or so is usually sufficient. Nails should be trimmed every few weeks, as needed.

Irish Setter Breed

 

The Irish Setter is a high-spirited gundog known for grace, swiftness, and a flashy red coat. They are famously good family dogs: sweet-tempered companions for the folks, and rollicking playmates and tennis-ball fetchers for the children. The Irish Setter has been described by its partisans as the most beautiful of dog breeds. Standing more than two feet at the shoulder, with a substantial yet elegant build, the Irish is famed for a brilliant coat of mahogany or chestnut. Long, sinewy legs and powerful rear drive help to place the Irish among the swiftest of all sporting dogs. The Irish Setter's lovable personality has endeared the breed to sportsmen and pet owners for more than 200 years. Irish are outgoing dogs who enjoy making friends. These rambunctious redheads are big kids at heart, but they are eager to please and will respond to patient, positive training. They are said to be bold and rugged hunting partners, with a devil-may-care approach to their work.

Grooming Tips

The Irish Setter's stunning rich-red coat requires moderate grooming to look its best. Irish should be brushed at least twice a week with a pin brush or a soft bristle brush; a long-toothed metal dog comb can also be used to help work out any tangles or mats that may be starting to form. The nails should be trimmed once a month. An occasional bath with a gentle shampoo meant for dogs will help to keep the coat and skin clean and healthy. Grooming sessions are a good time to check the dog all over for any new lumps or skin problems, and to check that the eyes and ears are healthy and trouble free.

Irish Terrier Breed

 

The Irish Terrier, 'Daredevil' of the Emerald Isle, is a bold, dashing, and courageous terrier of medium size. Known for his fiery red coat and a temperament to match, the Irish Terrier is stouthearted at work and tenderhearted at home. Irish Terriers are the prototype of a long-legged terrier. Standing about 18 inches at the shoulder, they're sturdy but lithe and graceful. Every line of the body is eye-catching, and the overall picture is beautifully balanced. The tight red coat is as fiery as the breed's temperament. ITs are a dog lover's delight: If your heart doesn't go pitty-pat at the sight of this Technicolor terrier framed against the vivid greens of the Irish countryside, forget dogs and buy a goldfish.

Grooming Tips

The Irish Terrier's short coat requires regular brushing, stripping, and trimming to keep it in good condition. His dense and wiry broken coat hugs the body and creates a tight, water-resistant jacket. Underneath the stiff outer coat, a dense undercoat of softer, finer hair traps body heat on a cool, damp day. Ideally the outer coat should be hand-stripped rather than clipped. Weekly brushing will help to remove dirt and loose hair and keep the dog looking his best. The nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can cause the dog discomfort.

Irish Water Spaniel Breed

 

The tallest of the AKC's spaniels, the Irish Water Spaniel is instantly recognizable by its crisply curled coat and tapering 'rat tail.' Among the champion swimmers of dogdom, the alert and inquisitive IWS is hardworking and brave in the field, and playfully affectionate at home. This tallest of AKC spaniels, standing 21 to 24 inches at the shoulder and weighing 55 to 65 pounds, straddles the line between 'medium' and 'large' dogs on our scale of size. Among its distinguishing characteristics are a crisply curled, liver-colored, waterproof coat; a tapered 'rat tail'; and a cleanly chiseled head crowned with a topknot of long, loose curls. The IWS moves with a smooth ground-covering gait, enabling him to put in a long day's work in the field.

Grooming Tips

Begin grooming the Irish Water Spaniel when he is still a puppy and may not need a lot done yet. He should learn early on that grooming time is a positive experience. Gentle brushing and nail and ear cleaning should always be part of the grooming regimen. Suitable for allergy sufferers, the breed's hypoallergenic coat requires brushing at least weekly and trimming every two months to neaten and shape it. If you do not want to learn to scissor your IWS to keep him from looking ragged, you can make regular appointments with a groomer who is familiar with the breed.

Irish Wolfhound Breed

 

The calm, dignified, and kindly Irish Wolfhound is the tallest of all AKC breeds. Once fearless big-game hunters capable of dispatching a wolf in single combat, Wolfhounds today are the most serene and agreeable of companions.

The amiable Irish Wolfhound is an immense, muscular hound gracefully built along classic Greyhound lines, capable of great speed at the gallop. A male might stand nearly 3 feet at the shoulder and weigh up to 180 pounds. Females will run smaller but are still a whole lot of hound. The rough, hard coat comes in many colors, including white, gray, brindle, red, black, and fawn. IWs are too serene to be fierce guard dogs, but just the sight of them is enough to deter intruders. IWs are characteristically patient with kids, though animals their size should be supervised around small children. Owning an Irish Wolfhound is a unique, rewarding experience'¿but acquiring a giant galloping hound is a commitment as big as the dog itself.

Grooming Tips

Irish Wolfhounds have a double coat that consists of a harsh, wiry outer coat covering a soft undercoat. They shed throughout the year, but not to an excessive degree. A thorough brushing once a week or so will help to remove dirt and loose hair and keep the dog looking his best. Unlike many double-coated breeds, Irish Wolfhounds don't 'blow out' their coats during an annual or semi-annual shedding season. As with all breeds, the nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can be painful to the dog and cause problems walking and running.

Italian Greyhound Breed

 

A true Greyhound in miniature, the elegant Italian Greyhound is an alert, playful, and highly affectionate toy companion. IGs make decorative couch dogs, but at heart they are flash-and-dash coursing hounds with an instinct for pursuit. IGs are Greyhounds in miniature'¿more slender, but a Greyhound's equal in grace and elegance. Standing ideally 13 to 15 inches at the shoulder, they present the sleek, curving lines common to all coursing hounds. Distinguishing features are the long, fine-boned legs. IGs combine the attentiveness of lapdogs with the complexity of ancient, aristocratic hounds. Bred for centuries to be doting companions and jesters, these high-stepping charmers refuse to be ignored. 'On the whole,' writes an IG expert, 'the breed would much rather be in your lap or bed than on the floor.' They are, though, true sighthounds and will bolt after quick-moving prey at the drop of a cat. A short-coat, low-fat breed, IGs require extra care in cold weathe

Grooming:

The most important grooming tip for the Italian Greyhound is that the teeth must be brushed on a regular basis, preferably daily. Dental cleaning by a veterinarian should be done yearly or as needed. Baths are rarely necessary unless the dog has gotten into something that can't be removed from the very short, smooth coat by gentle brushing. The nails need regular attention, preferably with a grinding tool. They should not be shortened all the way to the quick. This breed has a hare foot, and the two middle nails can be left slightly longer than the other two. Source

Jack-a-Poo (Jack Russell Terrier + Poodle) Breed

 

The Jack-A-Poo has been developed by crossing the Jack Russell Terrier and the Toy or Miniature Poodle. This designer dog has a muzzle of medium length, curled (or docked) tail and a long, curly coat. Having gained a lot of popularity in the United States in the recent years, this breed has a variety of names recognized by the different Kennel Clubs. Inheriting the intelligence of both its parents, the Jack-A-Poo is a pleasant natured dog with a soothing temperament.Coat are straight, Curly, coarse, fluffy and Short.Color white with tan or black mark, black,brown and white chocolate, golden, gray, blue

Temperament and Personality

This Jack Russell Terrier and Poodle mix have a blend of the temperament of both parents. Having inherited the high energy levels of the Jack Russell Terrier, these dogs are extremely active. They are perfect family dogs, getting along well with children and elderly people. The Jackapoos with a gentle disposition mingles well with other dogs though it is not advisable to keep them in a family having other pets as well.

Their trait of emitting a high pitched bark whenever a stranger is at the door makes them act effectively as a doorbell, warning their owners of the unknown person. They enjoy being cuddled in the lap of their owners, a trait that they partially inherit from the Jack Russell Terrier. They are also very curious about things, alert and love to keep their family members entertained and amused.

Grooming Tips

These less shedders need minimal grooming. Their coats seem to tangle easily, thus combing it weekly using a firm plastic brush will prevent it from getting knotted. If they acquire the dense, curly coat of the Poodle, then clipping is required using a puppy or pet clip. Trimming its fur is required when it grows especially over the eyes. Bathe them when needed and check their ears occasionally to prevent infection of any kind.

Jadgterrier Breed

 

Also known as the Deutscher Jagdterrier, the Jagdterrier is courageous, enduring, vital, full of temperament, reliable, sociable and trainable. He always takes pleasure in his work. The Jagdterrier is a versatile hunting dog from Germany. In German, literally means "hunt terrier." He is particularly suited to hunting under the ground and as a flushing dog and is relatively small, compact, and well-proportioned. His dense coat, either hard and rough or course and smooth, is usually black and tan, but can be dark brown or grayish-black as well. The tan markings are on his eyebrows, muzzle, chest, legs, and at the base of his tail. He could also have small white markings on his chest and toes.

Grooming Tips

Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep your Jagdterrier clean and looking his best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your dog. The strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting and cracking. Ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

Japanese Akita Inu Breed

 

Descending from regional hunting dogs, the Japanese Akitainu was initially restored and preserved by dedicated breeders in the Akitainu Hozonkai (Akita Dog Preservation Society; AKIHO). The breed is known for its striking appearance and its physical and mental agility.

Grooming Tips

A slicker brush may be used during grooming sessions during normal times. However, the Japanese Akitainu blows its undercoat twice a year. Profusely. So expect tufts of hair everywhere during that time. A bath, followed by cold forced air dryer and a comb out will help expedite the natural process of blowing coat. Nails should be kept trimmed using clippers or a nail grinder. Regular teeth brushing and maintaining ear cleanliness are essential not just for appearance but for health. To maintain healthy and luxurious coats, gentle brushing every few days is recommended (depending on activities); for long coats, more frequent brushing will help to avoid matting.

Japanese Chin Breed

 

The Japanese Chin is a charming toy companion of silky, profuse coat and an unmistakably aristocratic bearing. Often described as a distinctly 'feline' breed, this bright and amusing lapdog is fastidious, graceful, and generally quiet. Chin are the unrivaled noblemen of Japanese breeds. They're tiny 'indoorsy' companions, with an unmistakably Eastern look and bearing. The head is large, the muzzle short, and the round, dark eyes convey, as Chin fans like to say, a 'look of astonishment.' The profuse mane around the neck and shoulders, the plumed tail arching over the back, and the pants or 'culottes' on the hind legs project the elegant, exotic appearance so typical of Asia's royal line of laptop cuddle bugs.

Grooming Tips

The long, silky coat of the Japanese Chin gives him the appearance of a high-maintenance breed, but he is surprisingly easy to maintain in top condition. He will require weekly brushing and a bath once a month or so, depending on his surroundings. The breed's nails grow very fast and should be trimmed regularly to keep them short and neat. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris that can cause ear infections, and teeth should be brushed regularly to avoid dental problems.

Japanese Spitz Breed

 

The Japanese Spitz are little comedians who want to make you happy and laugh. They are very loyal and smart and make wonderful companions. Game for adventures, they will tag along on a hike, a car ride, or a trip to the beach or lake. They love their humans and just enjoy being with them.

The Japanese Spitz, as a companion breed, enjoy the company of their families and truly are little comedians. They love to please their family and are thus eager to learn; they always have a smile on their face. Distinctive features include their pure white coat that has a mane-like feature about their neck. Also, like other spitz breeds, their tails curl over their back in a beautiful hair plume. A pointed muzzle likens them to a fox with a black nose, black eye rims, and ears of pointed triangles, which stand erect and move like radar towers, hearing everything going on around them and making this breed very alert.

Grooming Tips

The Japanese Spitz has a profuse, white, double coat. The undercoat, which they shed twice per year, is thick and generous, with an outer coat that is longer. When they ¿blow¿ their coat (aka shedding), the entire undercoat is shed in the span of about 2 to 3 weeks. Daily brushing will be required to remove the fur, but the hair will inevitably be on your clothes, furniture, and floor. For most of the year though, this breed is low maintenance and only requires a weekly brushing with infrequent baths unless the dog gets into something messy. Bathing too often can cause them to lose their natural oils and can irritate their skin, so once per season is sufficient. Luckily, the Japanese Spitz has a teflon-like coat ¿ that is to say, mud and dirt don¿t stick to their fur. If they do get muddy, you simply wait for it to dry and then brush it out. As with all breeds, the Spitz¿s nails should be trimmed regularly.

Japanese Terrier Breed

 

Japanese Terriers are a small, highly intelligent breed full of terrier temperaments. They are independent, active, crisp, and lively. As one-person dogs, they are often reserved with strangers. Keen and alert, Japanese Terriers will hear the slightest noise and give warning to any stranger. He has no issue with respectful children and other dogs. As a sporting terrier and versatile, eager-to-learn dog, he has great athleticism and inborn instincts. By the 1900s, at the end of the Meiji Era, some of these best dogs were seen in the Kobe streets, and were called the "Kobe Terriers". The appearance of these "Kobe Terriers" was like a mix of the modern Smooth Fox Terriers and the Japanese Terriers. These dogs were the first terrier-type dogs to be bred in Japan. The dogs had several names like "Oyuki Terriers" and "Mikado Terriers", and were kept by the Japanese as well as some foreigners.

Around 1916, in the Nada ward near Kobe, a dog named Kuro meaning black in Japanese was born from an out-cross breeding from English Toy Terriers and a Toy Bull Terrier both imported from the Western countries. With careful selections of the breeding pairs out of these offsprings and the Kobe Terriers a very short-haired, slim, small terrier type dog was born which are today known as the Japanese Terriers. By 1930, their work with the breed helped develop a standard and was finally recognized by the Japan Kennel Club. The Japanese Terriers did not become widespread until 1940, when they were seen in most major Japanese cities. The demand for this breed skyrocketed when these cities demanded for a small, more active dog than large watch-dogs. However, the breed faced two instances throughout its history where they faced extinction later on: first during World War II, and then around 1948 when the Western breeds became more fashionable.

Grooming:

The Japanese Terrier's short-haired, smooth coat requires minimal care. A weekly brushing with a soft brush or hound glove will keep his coat healthy and glossy, with an occasional bath only as needed. His ears should be regularly inspected for dirt or buildup of excess wax and cleaned if needed with soft gauze and an ear-cleaning solution. The nails should be trimmed often, keeping them short and neat, as overly long nails can cause the dog discomfort. Teeth should be brushed daily if possible, using a toothpaste formulated for dogs. Source

Jindo Breed

 

Loyal, watchful, and intelligent, the Jindo developed as a breed on an island off the coast of South Korea. Medium-sized and natural in appearance, they are valued as independent hunters, discerning guardians, and loyal companions.

The Jindo Dog is a well-proportioned, medium-sized dog used for hunting and guarding. With erect ears and a rolled or sickle-shaped tail, it should be a vivid expression of agility, strength, alertness and dignity.The Jindo has a very strong instinct for hunting and is bold, brave, alert and careful, not tempted easily and impetuous. But most of all he is extremely faithful to his master. On the whole he is not fond of other animals, especially males. He also has a good sense of direction. A one-man dog, he readily accepts a new master, but never forgets his attachment towards the former master who raised him from puppyhood. He keeps himself clean and eats sparingly.

Grooming Tips

The Jindo is a fastidious breed whose double coat requires weekly brushing with a slicker or pin brush. They are known for being extremely meticulous and clean. Their double coat repels dirt and water, and they do not normally produce an odor. Throughout most of the year, their coat requires little more than weekly brushing to keep shedding at a minimum and the occasional bath for them to look their best. As with all double-coated breeds, twice a year the Jindo 'blows' its coat. During this time, the entire undercoat is shed over the course of a month or more, and both regular brushing of the dog and vacuuming of the home are required.

Kai Ken Breed

 

The Kai Ken is a medium-sized dog and is one of the six native Japanese breeds. Traditionally used to hunt a wide range of game in the mountains of Japan, the Kai Ken is considered a rare breed even in Japan. The Kai is highly intelligent and learns quickly. They seem to learn as fast as the other Japanese breeds if not faster. They are not as independent and are more willing to please their companions. The Japanese describe the Kai Ken as a trustworthy guardian and extremely devoted to his master.

Kai Ken are athletic and intelligent with a strong desire to hunt. The Kai is an independent thinker and can form a strong bond with their family. They are excellent swimmers and climbers and have been known to climb trees and swim rivers in pursuit of game. Kai have a distinct brindle coat that comes in three colors: Black Brindle (Kuro-Tora), Brindle (Chu-Tora), and Red Brindle (Aka-Tora). Red brindle is the rarest of the coat colors. The distinct coloring and brindle pattern enabled the dog to blend in to the mountainous forests in which it hunted, camouflaging it against prey and predators in ancient times. The amount of brindle will vary from dog to dog as well as the brindle pattern. Most puppies are born completely black and their brindle will emerge as they age and will continue to change for around the first five years of their life. In the home, the Kai Ken requires basic canine care. They can be kept in an apartment setting provided they receive regular exercise in the form of leashed walks. Being a naturally clean breed, bathing should be limited to only when dirty. Brushing is recommended, especially during twice-a-year coat blowing.

Grooming Tips

Kai Ken have a medium-length double coat. They are a naturally clean dog that only requires the occasional bath. Being a double-coated breed, they do lose their undercoat twice a year. During this time, additional bathing and brushing will help remove the thick undercoat. When not shedding their undercoat, occasional brushing will keep their coat in good condition. Their nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting, and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

Karelian Bear Dog Breed

 

The Karelian Bear Dog is an eager hunter and very independent, yet works cooperatively to mark game by barking. Their senses, especially smell, are sharp, thus the breed is suitable for big game hunting. They have a very good sense of direction, are balanced, courageous and persistent. This breed has a highly developed spirit for game and are very self-confident. They may be territorial towards other males, but are never aggressive towards people, though they may be slightly reserved.

The Karelian Bear Dog is a medium-sized spitz with a dense coat, but his standards are closer to that of non-spitz dogs such as the Samoyed and Siberian Husky, though the similarities end there. Bred to hunt large, aggressive game by himself, his build reflects his duties. He is a silent hunter, and only barks once the game is stopped or treed. Working with an experienced hunter, he communicates the type of animal he has located by the sound of his bark. Though he can demonstrate self-control around people, his fighting spirit surfaces around other dogs and can be difficult to handle. His spirit easily turns into aggression, as Karelian Bear Dogs love a challenge.

Grooming Tips

Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep your Karelian Bear Dog clean and looking his best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your pet. The strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting, and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

Keeshond Breed

 

The amiable Keeshond is a medium-sized spitz dog of ample coat, famous for the distinctive "spectacles" on his foxy face. Once a fixture on the canal barges of his native Holland, the Kees was, and remains, a symbol of Dutch patriotism.

These square, sturdy companions descend from the same ancient stock as other spitz types, such as Pomeranians and Samoyeds. Typically "spitzy," Keeshonden have a foxy face, pointed ears, an abundant coat, and a plumed tail carried high over the back. A unique breed characteristic'¿and one of the most charming hallmarks in all dogdom is the "spectacles." These shadings and markings around the eyes give the impression that a Kees is wearing designer eyewear. The specs draw attention to an alert, intelligent expression.

Grooming Tips

Keeshonden do require regular grooming, but going through their coats once a week with a pin brush usually does the job. This will keep the undercoat brushed out, and keeps shedding to a minimum. The only trimming needed is tidying around the feet, pads, and hocks. Pet owners can brush weekly and take their dogs to the groomer for a bath and blow-dry every four to six weeks, or they do it themselves. Show dogs are bathed a few days before the show weekend.

Kerry Blue Terrier Breed

 

Among the largest of AKC terriers, the Kerry Blue Terrier is famous for his show-stopping blue coat. Named for the Irish county of his birth, this onetime farm dog is today an alert, adaptable, and animated watchdog and family companion. Of course, we begin with the show-stopping coat that turns heads wherever Kerries go. It comes in shades of blue'¿from a deep slate to a light blue-gray'¿and is so soft that it's as pleasing to the touch as it is to the eye. The dense coat covers a muscular, well-developed body standing below 20 inches at the shoulder and weighing up to 40 pounds. A sporty beard and dark, keen eyes accentuate the nobility of the long terrier head.

Grooming Tips

Kerries do not shed, so their coat must be thoroughly brushed and combed once a week to avoid matting. Combined with regular brushing, a full grooming every six to eight weeks will keep the coat manageable. The head, neck, ears, and abdomen are done with clippers, but the coat is trimmed with scissors. Your breeder or another Kerry owner is your best resource when trying to learn how to trim your dog. There are excellent charts and guides available on the website of the United States Kerry Blue Terrier Club , and videos on YouTube. Trim the nails at least once a week, and clean ears at least twice a month.

Kishu Ken Breed

 

The Kishu Ken is a dog of noteworthy endurance, showing nobility, dignity and naive feeling. His temperament is faithful, docile and very alert. The Kishu Ken is a large game hound used in the densely forested mountains of Japan. They are spirited, alert, and rustic dogs with compact, well-developed muscles. Kishu are often white-coated, medium-sized, with erect ears, a tail held over the back, and keen expression.

Grooming Tips

Kishu Ken shed their coat one to two times a year in seasonal "moults." Bathing and drying with a high velocity drier during these time will get rid of dead coat. They may need occasional maintenance with a rubber brush or slicker and should have nail trims as needed.

Komondor Breed

 

A powerfully large Hungarian flock guardian covered in profuse white cords from head to tail, the Komondor is among the world's most recognizable breeds. The independent and protective Kom requires a firm, experienced hand at training. Our Hungarian-language tip of the day: The plural of Komondor is Komondorok. Now, let's take a look at the dog. What we see is a large and powerful guardian covered in profuse white cords. A big male can stand more than 27.5 inches and weigh over 100 pounds, with heavy bone, a deep chest, and lots of muscle. Despite their brawn Komondorok are agile and light-footed, and move with long strides. With their unique look, it's impossible to mistake Koms for anything else.

Grooming Tips

A beautiful corded coat is the result of special care. An experienced breeder reports, 'We never brush, but do wash the dogs regularly. When the coat starts to clump or '¿plate up' at 9 or 10 months, we start to split the clumps or plates into areas that grow out of an area on the skin about the size of a quarter. Those grow out into the cords. There is no reason for a corded coat to smell bad or be dirty. Bathing with dilute shampoo gets the job done. To finish the bath, make sure to rinse out every hint of the shampoo, and then dry by squeezing, using towels, and then in front of a strong fan overnight. If the coat doesn't get dry or has residual shampoo, it might smell badly.'

Kromforhlander Breed

 

The Kromfohrlander is a medium-sized companion breed that is sensitive, loving and loyal to its owners. He has a distinctive 'smile' and will sneeze to greet you. Pronunciation of the breed is "krome-for-lahn-dair. "The Kromfohrlander is a very intelligent, funny, agile dog which loves to climb and jump and easily excels at agility and dog-trick training but can be fussy with food. They come in two coat types: wirehaired (with beard) and smooth haired (smooth face with no beard and beautiful, long, soft hair). The breed's nickname in North America is "Kromi" (krome-ee). The Kromfohrlander was bred to be a companion only, retains very little hunting instinct (despite its terrier heritage), and is often long-lived (17-18 years old). He is good with children and family and tends to be a one-person dog. He is very attached to his owner, will not run away, and is first to alert to strangers.

Grooming Tips

To maintain a tidy appearance, regular hand-stripping or grooming is required. Most Kromis grow a scruffy, wirehaired coat that sheds. It is not to be clipped or shaved. They have little to no doggy odor and dirt just falls off their coats; they are remarkably clean dogs. It is important to continue regular nail clipping as this can become very difficult due to the typical sensitivity of the breed.

Kuvasz Breed

 

The snow-white Kuvasz is Hungary's majestic guardian of flocks and companion of kings. A working dog of impressive size and strength, the imposing and thickly coated Kuvasz is a beautiful, smart, profoundly loyal, but challenging breed. Imposing, impressive, majestic, massive, mighty, pick the adjective you like best, they all apply to the Kuvasz (pronounced KOO-vahz; the plural is Kuvaszok, pronounced KOO-vah-sock). This snow-white livestock guardian of luxuriant coat can stand as high as 30 inches at the shoulder, and weigh between 70 and 110 pounds. Despite their size and strength, Kuvs are quick-moving, nimble-footed protectors when meeting a threat. The breed's fans say that the elegantly proportioned head 'is considered to be the most beautiful part of the Kuvasz.'

Grooming Tips

The Kuvasz has a double coat, consisting of guard hair and fine undercoat. His coat is very easy to care for, needing only weekly brushing to remove debris and reduce shedding. Beyond that, an occasional bath will keep him clean and looking his best. His nails should be trimmed every month or so if not worn down naturally, as overly long nails can cause him discomfort.

Labradoodle (Labrador + Poodle) Breed

 

A cross between the nation’s much-loved Labrador and Poodle breeds, Labradoodles are kind and affectionate with plenty of energy and a playful nature, making them an ideal family dog. High energy, these active dogs are best suited to families who can take them for long, interesting walks of up to an hour a day. Labradoodles are very playful and can remain puppy-like well into their senior years. Extremely friendly and outgoing, the Labradoodle’s characteristics are similar to that of a small child – playful, busy, eager to please and curious about the world around them.

Grooming Tips

Labradoodles come in three coat varieties: hair coat, which is similar to the fur seen in shedding breeds; wool coat, which is denser, hangs in long curls and is non-shedding; and fleece coat, which is soft, silky and curly. Bred to be hypoallergenic, Labradoodles may be a good pet for someone with allergies as they shed less than other dogs. Your Labradoodle’s grooming requirements will vary depending on the length and type of their coat. Aim to brush twice a week with a trip to the groomer’s two to four times per year. Bathe your Labradoodle only when they are visibly dirty or smelly. Bathing too frequently could dry out their skin and cause them to become itchy. Check for lumps, bumps and parasites whilst grooming. Brush your Labradoodle’s teeth as often as possible to prevent gum disease and associated issues.

Labrador Retriever Breed

 

The sweet-faced, lovable Labrador Retriever is America's most popular dog breed. Labs are friendly, outgoing, and high-spirited companions who have more than enough affection to go around for a family looking for a medium-to-large dog. The sturdy, well-balanced Labrador Retriever can, depending on the sex, stand from 21.5 to 24.5 inches at the shoulder and weigh between 55 to 80 pounds. The dense, hard coat comes in yellow, black, and a luscious chocolate. The head is wide, the eyes glimmer with kindliness, and the thick, tapering 'otter tail' seems to be forever signaling the breed's innate eagerness. Labs are famously friendly. They are companionable housemates who bond with the whole family, and they socialize well with neighbor dogs and humans alike. But don't mistake his easygoing personality for low energy: The Lab is an enthusiastic athlete that requires lots of exercise, like swimming and marathon games of fetch, to keep physically and mentally fit.

Grooming Tips

The Lab has a thick, water-repellant double coat that sheds. Give occasional baths to keep them clean. As with all breeds, the Lab's nails should be trimmed regularly and his teeth brushed frequently.

Lagotto Romagnolo Breed

 

The Lagotto Romagnolo, Italy's adorable 'truffle dog,' sports a curly coat and lavish facial furnishings. Despite their plush-toy looks, Lagotti are durable workers of excellent nose who root out truffles, a dainty and pricey delicacy. Italians have a word for it: 'carino.' In English, we say 'cute.' In any language, this breed is totally endearing. The Lagotto Romagnolo (plural: Lagotti Romagnoli) is known for wooly curls that cover the body head to tail, crowned by a lavish beard, eyebrows, and whiskers. Lagotti stand under 20 inches and weigh no more than 35 pounds. But don't be fooled by their teddy-bear looks, these are rugged workers of true strength and endurance. The breed's trademark curls feel and behave more like human hair than fur.

Grooming Tips

The Lagotto's rough-looking, waterproof coat forms thick, tight curls that cover the entire body except for the head. They have a double coat of hair rather than fur and shed only minimally, although they may leave little tufts of hair once in a while. The coat needs to be trimmed on a regular basis. Some Lagotto coats mat more than others, and it is important to groom regularly to prevent this. The ears should be checked weekly for buildup of wax or debris, or any signs of infection.

Lakeland Terrier Breed

 

A bold, zesty "big dog in a small package," the Lakeland Terrier, named for the Lake District of his native England, was once a farmer's dog bred to work in packs on sheep-stealing foxes. The Lakie's coat is hard, wiry, and low-shedding. Square and sturdy Lakelands, standing less than 15 inches at the shoulder and weighing about 17 pounds, are small dogs. But don't tell them that. With their cock-of-the-walk swagger, Lakelands personify the old dog-lover's cliché "a big dog in a small package." They come in several colors; some have a sporty saddle mark on the back. With folded V-shaped ears, a straight front, rectangular head, and a mischievous twinkle in their eye, Lakelands are the blueprint of a long-legged British terrier.

Grooming Tips

Lakelands have a beautiful, harsh double coat when maintained properly by hand plucking. Finding someone who can pluck (or "strip") a coat is difficult, however. Clippering the coat will also suffice, but with this the color and texture of the coat will fade. Once clipped the coat becomes soft, with loose curls. The hairs tend to not drop out, instead staying caught up in the coat, so the Lakeland is considered a non-shedding breed suitable for people who can't tolerate lots of dander. Brushing weekly will help to remove the loose hairs and prevent mats.

Lancashire Heeler Breed

 

The Lancashire Heeler is a medium to high energy dog. Intelligent, alert and friendly, they are quick to learn new tasks. A sturdy little dog with a short, weather-resistant coat of black and tan or liver and tan, they are affectionate with their owners, always happy, talkative and always ready for a walk. Their small size is what gives them their charm. Small, powerful, sturdily built, alert and an energetic worker, the Lancashire Heeler works cattle but has terrier instincts when rabbiting and ratting. They have a unique characteristic called the Heeler Smile; when content, Heelers have been known to draw back their lips in an effort that emulates a human smile. In 2003, the breed was placed on the Endangered Breeds list of The Kennel Club, U.K, due to the small number of dogs composing the gene pool and the risk of several inherited diseases.

Grooming Tips

The Lancashire Heeler is a breed that can go from the field to the show ring. Their short, hard, flat coat is dense and waterproof, needing very little grooming. A light brushing and occasional bath will keep your Heeler happy and clean. The nails should be trimmed, if needed, with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting, and cracking. Ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

Lapponian Herder Breed

 

The Lapponian Herder is a medium-sized dog with a medium coat, making them easy to maintain and perfect for any experienced dog owner. They are a wonderful, rounded, diversified dog breed ready to problem solve any task given to them. They can fit into most living environments as long as they are given jobs to do. This breed comes in many colors including grey-brown, black often with lighter undercoats, and white or tan markings. They are aloof with strangers but love their people. The Lapponian Herder is an independent, fun breed. They are very intelligent and generally eager to please. As a high-energy herding breed, they excel in many other dog sports besides herding, such as companion events. Its love of hard work makes it a wonderful breed in any event that is competitive and fun. Early socialization is important because of their herding mentality and they thrive when they have a job to do. Though eager to please, the Lapponian Herder is very vocal and often barks while working.

Grooming Tips

The Lapponian Herder has a thick double coat. He sheds his undercoat once or twice a year, usually in the spring and fall. Although his coat is smooth and does not tangle, occasional brushing and baths can help it stay healthy, shiny, and free of parasites. The nails should be trimmed when needed with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting, and cracking. Ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

Leonberger Breed

 

The Leonberger is a lush-coated giant of German origin. They have a gentle nature and serene patience and they relish the companionship of the whole family. A huge and powerful dog, yes, but the Leonberger is also known for his aristocratic grace and elegance. A male can stand over 31 inches at the shoulder and weigh as much as a full-grown human. Females run smaller but are still a whole lot of dog. Breed hallmarks include a medium-long waterproof coat, lush triangular ears, a bushy tail, and a black facemask that frames kindly dark-brown eyes. A dramatic feature of the male's coat is the lion-like mane around the neck and chest. A well-built Leo moves with an easy, elastic gait. A Leo is friendly but nobody's fool. As watchdogs and all-around workers, they exhibit intelligence and sound judgment. Leos require lots of brushing, ample room for romping, and unlimited love.

Grooming Tips

Leonbergers shed a lot'¿and twice a year, they shed even more. A Leo should be brushed every day, especially in the areas of his body that tend to mat: the long hair behind the ears and on the backs of the legs. A more thorough grooming should be done once a week'¿and given the breed's size, this will take a fair amount of time. Leos have a thick, full outer coat and a shorter, fluffier undercoat. A metal comb and an undercoat rake can be used to work out the undercoat, and a pin brush and a slicker brush will neaten up the outer coat. In addition, a Leo's nailsshould be trimmed every other week.

Lhasa Apso Breed

 

The lavishly coated Lhasa Apso is a thousand-year-old breed who served as sentinels at palaces and monasteries isolated high in the Himalayas. Smart, confident, and complex, Lhasas are family comedians but regally aloof with strangers. Standing less than a foot high at the shoulder, Lhasas are small but hardy dogs of aristocratic bearing. They're famous for a floor-length, flat-hanging coat, parted in the middle and draping each side of the body. A feathery tail curls over the back in the distinct manner of Tibetan breeds. The breed's fans say the dark, oval-shaped eyes peeping through lavish facial hair are the windows of a Lhasa's merry soul. The complete picture is unmistakably Asian: exotic, elegant, and serenely well balanced.Source

Grooming Tips

Long hair or puppy cut? Both require regular maintenance, and this is a choice for the owner to make. Lhasas in a puppy cut or other clip still should be brushed regularly and bathed between visits to the groomer. Long hair requires regular brushing, using the right tools and techniques. Expect to bathe a long coat at least every two weeks, and brush at least once between baths. Thorough rinsing is essential, as shampoo residue irritates the skin. Conditioners and finishing sprays make grooming easier. Freshly bathed long or clipped hair should be thoroughly dried and brushed, as damp hair, even when clean, will mat.Source

Lowchen Breed

 

A small, bright, and lively dog that originated as a companion breed in pre-Renaissance Europe where ladies of the court groomed it in the likeness of a little lion. Breed characteristics are a compact, balanced body; a relatively short, broad topskull and muzzle; and a proud, lively gait that accentuates the lion cut with a long flowing mane. These quintessential features, combined with an outgoing and positive attitude, result in a dog of great style. The Löwchen is alert, intelligent, and affectionate with the overall qualities of a loving companion dog. It has a lively, outgoing, and inquisitive personality. Source

Grooming Tips:

The Lowchen does require routine bathing and grooming in order to keep them in top condition to look and feel their best. This outgoing little dog possesses a single coat that is long and flowing if properly maintained. If you look closely at the coat, there are a few heavier guard hairs intermingled with a finer undercoat mixed throughout the coat. Because of this type of coat, regular brushing is mandatory in order to keep a stylized Lowchen. Depending on their activity level, bathing a Lowchen can be done as often as weekly or as little as once a month. The coat should be brushed and combed out completely before the bath. This practice allows any mats or tangles to be broken apart before the bath making it less stressful for you and the Lowchen. A preliminary bath to lift off and remove dirt, debris, and any environmental factors to bring the coat back to a neutral state in always beneficial for this active dog. Always choose the mildest shampoo to get the job done. The secondary bath is used to enhance the coat, whether you are wanting to hydrate the skin and coat, enhance the color, or even change the texture. When you do the final rinse, it is a good idea to cool the water temperature, so you do not dehydrate the skin. And make sure to rinse, rinse, rinse, and then rinse again. The challenge with the Lowchen coat is similar to a Lhasa Apso and a Shih Tzu. The drop coat can mat easily especially since are such an active breed. Because of this, a good, heavy conditioner is needed with every bath to help maintain the integrity of the coat. Source

Maltese Breed

 

The tiny Maltese, 'Ye Ancient Dogge of Malta,' has been sitting in the lap of luxury since the Bible was a work in progress. Famous for their show-stopping, floor-length coat, Maltese are playful, charming, and adaptable toy companions. Maltese are affectionate toy dogs weighing less than seven pounds, covered by a long, straight, silky coat. Beneath the all-white mantle is a compact body moving with a smooth and effortless gait. The overall picture depicts free-flowing elegance and balance. The irresistible Maltese face' with its big, dark eyes and black gumdrop nose' can conquer the most jaded sensibility. Despite their aristocratic bearing, Maltese are hardy and adaptable pets. They make alert watchdogs who are fearless in a charming toy-dog way, and they are game little athletes on the agility course. Maltese are low-shedding, long-lived, and happy to make new friends of all ages. Sometimes stubborn and willful, they respond well to rewards-based training.

Grooming Tips:

The long, white coat of the Maltese is eye-catching and glorious. It requires daily gentle brushing and combing to the skin to prevent mats and tangles. Maltese should also have regular baths and coat conditioning to keep their hair looking its best. They have fast-growing nails that should be trimmed regularly. Check their ears weekly, and remove any excess hair or wax and any accumulated debris. Because Maltese are prone to dental disease as they get older, their teeth should be brushed frequently'¿ideally each time their coat is brushed. If the dog has excessive tear-staining around the eyes , a visit to the veterinarian to determine a possible cause is recommended.Source

Maltipoo (Maltese + Poodle) Breed

 

Maltipoos can reach a height of 8 to 14 inches, often depending on the size of their parents. They can also weigh as light as 5 lbs or as heavy as 20 lbs. One has to remember that the Maltipoo is a companion dog. The variance in the size and weight of the Maltipoo is dependent on the type of Poodle used in the crossbreeding. If the breeder used a Miniature Poodle, then the Maltipoo can be as tall as 14 inches and as heavy as 20 lbs. If it’s a Toy Poodle that’s used in the crossbreeding process, then you will get a Maltipoo that’s on the smaller side of things. As mentioned, breeders do not use Standard Poodles in the creation of a Maltipoo. This will result in a larger designer dog. There are also issues in mating. The only way one can create a Maltipoo from a Standard Poodle is by inseminating a female Poodle. This is the only way one can expect to create a Maltese Standard Poodle mix. Coat Colors If you mate a pure white Poodle with a Maltese, then you can expect the Maltipoo to be all white, too. Maltese dogs only come in white. Poodles, on the other hand, will come in different colors. Since this is a mating of two different breeds, the litter will show at least 50 percent of the trait of either parent. Maltipoos, in general, can come in various colors. They can be white, cream, brown, silver, blue, and apricot. Some can also have a combination of these colors. It Can Bark a Lot The Maltipoo is not a quiet designer breed. It will bark when it requires the attention of its human family. It also barks when it senses something off. It is not a guard dog, however. This barking behavior is innate in the breed. However, you can always temper it with early training. Prone to Separation Anxiety Separation anxiety is a very common behavior in Maltipoos. This is inherent in their strong desire to be with their human companions. If they do not see their favorite person for a long time, Maltipoos can grow depressed. Some can manifest destructive behaviors, too.

Grooming Tips

There is one part of Maltipoo grooming that is very important. This is the cleaning of the area around the dog’s eyes. Tear stains are most visible among Maltipoos that have light-colored coats like white, cream, and beige. Everyday cleaning is important to prevent making the stains permanent. Aside from daily cleaning of the dog’s eyes, it is also crucial to brush its coat at least once every 2 to 3 days. This designer breed has a smooth coat that does not shed that much. It is quite easy to brush. However, the coat is still prone to tangles and mats, especially in areas where the coat can rub against the dog’s body. Brushing or combing these areas is a necessity. Cleaning the Maltipoo’s ears is also important. Dirt and debris can enter the ear canal. Waxy substances can also accumulate. This can hamper the dog’s hearing abilities. One should always inspect the ears every week and clean it using an appropriate dog-safe solution. Brushing the Maltipoo’s teeth is also important. Do not rely on kibbles and dog chews alone to remove debris from the pet’s teeth. If possible, pet owners should brush the Maltipoo’s teeth every day. If not, twice a week should be enough. Trim the dog’s nails, too. You can do this once every 2 to 3 weeks.

Manchester Terrier (Standard) Breed

 

The Manchester Terrier is named after the English city where it was first bred. Sleek, racy dogs who possess a terrier's ratting instinct and the graceful contours of coursing hounds, Manchesters are spirited, bright, and athletic. They combine the streamlined grace of a coursing hound and the instincts of a fearless rat terrier. These racy dogs come in two size varieties: Standard (not exceeding 22 pounds) and Toy (not exceeding 12 pounds). All Manchesters are similar in temperament, body type and athletic ability despite differences in size. They're easily recognized by a tight coat of rich mahogany tan and jet black. The head is long and wedge-shaped; tan spots above each eye point up a watchful expression. Manchesters can motor, running with good reach in front and propulsive rear drive powered by a muscular caboose.

Grooming:

The Manchester is a very easily maintained, 'wash and wear' kind of dog. An occasional bath with a shampoo formulated for dogs is all that is necessary to keep him looking quite dapper. Wiping him down weekly with a damp towel or a hound glove will give the coat a healthy shine. Nail trimming should be done every couple of weeks to maintain the proper alignment of his joints. Ears should be cleaned regularly to keep them free of excess wax or debris that can cause a painful ear infection. The Manchester will look forward to these grooming times as a bonding experience with the human he loves. Source

Manchester Terrier (Toy) Breed

 

The Manchester Terrier is named after the English city where it was first bred. Sleek, racy dogs who possess a terrier's ratting instinct and the graceful contours of coursing hounds, Manchesters are spirited, bright, and athletic. They combine the streamlined grace of a coursing hound and the instincts of a fearless rat terrier. These racy dogs come in two size varieties: Toy (not exceeding 12 pounds) and Standard (not exceeding 22 pounds). Manchesters combine the streamlined grace of a small coursing hound and the instincts of a fearless rat terrier. These racy little dogs come in two size varieties: Toy (not exceeding 12 pounds) and Standard (not exceeding 22 pounds). All Manchesters are similar in temperament, body type and athletic ability despite differences in size. They're easily recognized by a tight coat of rich mahogany tan and jet black. The head is long and wedge-shaped; tan spots above each eye point up a watchful expression. Manchesters can motor, running with good reach in front and propulsive rear drive powered by a muscular caboose.

Grooming:

The Manchester is a very easily maintained 'wash and wear' kind of dog. An occasional bath with a shampoo formulated for dogs is all that is necessary to keep him looking quite dapper. Wiping him down weekly with a damp towel or a hound glove will give the coat a healthy shine. Toenail trimming should be done every couple of weeks to maintain the proper alignment of his joints. Ears should be cleaned regularly to keep them free of excess wax or debris that can cause a painful ear infection. The Manchester will look forward to these grooming times as a bonding experience with the human whom he loves. Source

Mastiff Breed

 

The colossal Mastiff belongs to a canine clan as ancient as civilization itself. A massive, heavy-boned dog of courage and prodigious strength, the Mastiff is docile and dignified but also a formidable protector of those they hold dear. For the uninitiated, a face-to-face encounter with these black-masked giants can be startling. A male stands at least 30 inches at the shoulder and can outweigh many a full-grown man. The rectangular body is deep and thickly muscled, covered by a short double coat of fawn, apricot, or brindle stripes. The head is broad and massive, and a wrinkled forehead accentuates an alert, kindly expression. Mastiffs are patient, lovable companions and guardians who take best to gentle training. Eternally loyal Mastiffs are protective of family, and a natural wariness of strangers makes early training and socialization essential. Mastiffs are magnificent pets, but acquiring a powerful giant-breed dog is commitment not to be taken lightly.

Grooming Tips

The Mastiff's short, dense coat is easy to groom, usually requiring only a quick brushing every few days. During periods of heavy shedding once or twice a year, more frequent sessions with a strong, toothed comb are recommended to remove dead hair. The ears and the deep wrinkles around the Mastiff's head, eyes, and muzzle should be regularly inspected and cleaned, and the nails trimmed short. Finally, Mastiffs drool! Most owners keep cloths at hand to wipe 'slingers' off their Mastiff's face and their own and visitors' clothing.

Miniature American Shepherd Breed

 

The Miniature American Shepherd resembles a small Australian Shepherd. True herders in spite of their compact size, Minis are bright, self-motivated workers and endearingly loyal and lively companion dogs who have an affinity for horses. The Miniature American Shepherd shares many physical traits with its forebear the Australian Shepherd'¿only on a smaller scale. Females stand between 13 and 17 inches at the shoulder; males range from 14 to 18 inches. Despite their size, Minis are every inch a true herding dog: energetic, versatile, rugged, and extremely bright. The eye-catching coat comes in black, blue merle, red, and red merle. (The merle will exhibit in any amount marbling, flecks, or blotches.) Minis move with the smooth and agile step of a dog built for hard work on punishing terrain.

Grooming Tips

The Miniature American Shepherd has a double coat, with a longer outer coat and a wooly undercoat. The breed sheds a fair amount, even more so during shedding season, which can occur once or twice a year. Weekly brushing'¿daily during shedding season'¿will help to remove dirt and loose hairs and keep the dog looking his best. Mats or tangles can be worked out with a slicker brush or metal comb. As with all breeds, the nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can cause the dog discomfort.

Miniature Bull Terrier Breed

 

In most every way the Miniature Bull Terrier is a Bull Terrier, only smaller. These upbeat, mischievous dogs come equipped with terrier fire and fearlessness. If ever a dog could claim the title 'Clown Prince of Dogdom,' it's the Mini. Like the class clown or an adorable toddler, the Miniature Bull Terrier is full of mischief and high spirits. With square bodies and egg-shaped heads, no other breed looks quite like it. These small, muscular terriers are strong, active, fearless, and endlessly entertaining. As fun as he is, it's not a good idea to let your Miniature Bull Terrier puppy get away with too many high jinxes. He'll be at his absolute best with early socialization and patient training; you couldn't ask for a more amusing companion.

Grooming:

The Miniature Bull Terrier doesn't require a lot of grooming beyond regular baths and a weekly once-over with a soft brush or hound glove. The breed's strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly using a nail clipper or grinder to avoid splitting and cracking of an overgrown nail. Their ears should be checked routinely to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly and should also receive periodic cleanings from your veterinarian. Source

Miniature Pinscher Breed

 

The leggy Miniature Pinscher is known to fans as the 'King of Toys.' This proud, fearless, fun-loving toy breed of lustrous coat and a compact, wedge-shaped physique is a true personality dog, known for a high-stepping 'hackney' gait. Min Pins are sturdy, compact dogs standing no more than 12.5 inches at the shoulder. The smooth, shiny coat comes in two shades of solid red, or chocolate-and-rust or black-and-rust. The dark, slightly oval eyes and high-set ears help bring out a self-possessed, 'big dog' personality. A distinguishing characteristic is the Min Pin's high-stepping 'hackney' gait, reminiscent of a hackney horse at the trot.

Grooming:

The Miniature Pinscher's short, hard coat is very easily maintained. A weekly once-over with a soft brush or a hound glove will keep him shining. With a new puppy, spending time together in grooming sessions helps to accustom him or her to being worked with and is an opportunity to develop the bond between you. The nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can cause the dog discomfort. Source

Miniature Schnauzer Breed

 

The Miniature Schnauzer, the smallest of the three Schnauzer breeds, is a generally healthy, long-lived, and low-shedding companion. Add an outgoing personality, a portable size, and sporty good looks, and you've got an ideal family dog. Stocky, robust little dogs standing 12 to 14 inches, Miniature Schnauzers were bred down from their larger cousins, Standard Schnauzers. The bushy beard and eyebrows give Minis a charming, human-like expression. The hard, wiry coat comes in three color patterns: salt and pepper, black and silver, and solid black. Created to be all-around farm dogs and ratters, they are tough, muscular, and fearless without being aggressive. The Miniature Schnauzer is a bright, friendly, trainable companion, small enough to adapt to apartment life but tireless enough to patrol acres of farmland. They get along well with other animals and kids. Minis are sturdy little guys and enjoy vigorous play. Home and family oriented, they make great watchdogs.

Grooming Tips

The Miniature Schnauzer has a double coat'¿a wiry topcoat, with a soft undercoat'¿that requires frequent brushing, combing, and grooming to look its best. The breed sheds very little. For the show ring, some of the dog's coat is regularly 'stripped' by hand. Most owners of pet Miniature Schnauzers choose to have the coat trimmed with clippers by a professional groomer. This should be done every five to eight weeks for the dog to look his best. The Miniature Schnauzer should get a bath once a month or so, depending on his surroundings. Nails should be trimmed monthly and ears checked weekly for debris or excess wax, and cleaned as needed.

Mountain Cur Breed

 

The Mountain Cur is a hunting dog with a good treeing instinct. It is a very courageous fighter and extremely intelligent, doing whatever job its master desires. The dogs were a crucial part of the cultures of early pioneers, settlers, and homesteaders. The Mountain Cur is a fast, hard hunter that runs track with its head in the air. He can be open, semi-open, or silent on track and has a clear bark that can be heard a long distance. They will circle and drift on a cold track if a hot one is not available until they locate a hot track. They are courageous fighters when required and extremely intelligent, with strong treeing instincts, and can easily be trained to leave unwanted game. They respond best to training with a lot of human contact, and in addition to hunting, make great companions and watch dogs.

Grooming:

The short hair of the Mountain Cur is easy to care for. Occasionally brush him to remove the dead and loose hair; a rubber curry comb or shedding blade works well for this. His coat sheds twice a year, so at these times, more frequent brushing may be necessary. Bathe him only when necessary, since it can dry out his skin. Trim nails and clean ears when needed. Source

Mudi Breed

 

The Mudi is an extremely versatile, intelligent, alert, agile, all-purpose Hungarian farm dog. His courage is useful for working the most stubborn livestock. The breed is a loyal protector of property and family members without being overly aggressive. The Mudi (pronounced "moodie") is a medium-sized herding dog from Hungary which has been in existence since the 19th century. It is said the Mudi evolved naturally from crosses of the Puli, Pumi and German Spitz breeds. Today, the Mudi, though very rare, is seen as an active, intelligent, biddable working breed. It is estimated there are no more than a few thousand Mudi worldwide, with the greatest numbers being in Hungary, followed by Finland, and then even scarcer throughout Europe, the U.S, and Canada. The Mudi excels at agility, obedience, and flyball, as well as other dog sports. He is a true working breed and shines when herding both cattle and sheep, and has found fame as a search and rescue dog in both Finland and the U.S.

Grooming Tips

The Mudi is an easily cared for breed. Occasional baths, a combing or bushing to remove dead hair, and regular nail care are sufficient for this wash-and-wear breed.

Neapolitan Mastiff Breed

 

The Neapolitan Mastiff is a huge, powerful guarder whose astounding appearance has intimidated intruders since the days of ancient Rome. Wary with strangers, the profusely wrinkled Mastino is sweet, placid, and steady among loved ones. Unless you've been to Jurassic Park, you've never seen anything like a Mastino. These majestic guardians of startling appearance are massive, powerful dogs. The U.S. Neapolitan Mastiff Club describes their dog's head as 'astounding''¿and give them credit for hitting upon just the right adjective. The profuse hanging wrinkles and folds, and pendulous lips, make a Mastino look like a marzipan Mastiff that's been out in the sun too long. And yet, the breed's inner dignity and nobility can only be described as beautiful.

Grooming:

The Neapolitan Mastiff is a short-coated breed, so in general a bath now and again is about all you need. The eyes and ears should be checked and gently cleaned whenever necessary with a damp cloth or paper towel. You will find that you will need to keep a towel handy to dry the face and lips (and yourself!), especially after the dog eats or drinks. Nails should be kept short. Source

Nederlandse Kooikerhondje Breed

 

The Nederlandse Kooikerhondje is lively, agile, self-confident, good-natured and alert. The breed is faithful, easy-going and friendly in the home. Outdoors he is a true sporting dog being keen, swift, tough, attentive and energetic. With sufficient perseverance and stamina, he enjoys working and does so with a cheerful character. The Kooikerhondje (Koi-ker-hond-yuh)'the 'little white and orange dog with a big heart' is a sporty, eye-catching fellow with a silky all-weather coat of white with red patches. They are instantly recognizable thanks to their large, black-tipped ears and the richly feathered tail they wag proudly. The breed has the sturdy bone structure expected of a serious hunter, but the overall picture is that of a harmoniously built dog of smooth, flowing contours and springy gait. The Nederlandse Kooikerhondje Club of the United States has served as the AKC Parent Club to represent the Kooikerhondje since April 2014.

Grooming Tips

Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep the Nederlandse Kooikerhondje clean and looking his best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your dog. The strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting, and cracking. Ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

Newfoundland Breed

 

The massive Newfoundland is a strikingly large, powerful working dog of heavy bone and dignified bearing. The sweet-tempered Newfie is a famously good companion and has earned a reputation as a patient and watchful 'nanny dog' for kids. A male Newfoundland can weigh up to 150 pounds and stand 28 inches at the shoulder; females typically go 100 to 120 pounds. The Newf head is majestic, the expression soft and soulful. The outer coat is flat and coarse. Colors are gray, brown, black, and a black-and-white coat named for artist Sir Edwin Landseer, who popularized the look in his paintings. The Newfie breed standard says that a sweet temperament is the 'most important single characteristic of the breed.' The Newf's sterling character is expressed in their affinity for kids. Trusting and trainable, Newfs respond well to gentle guidance. These noble giants are among the world's biggest dogs, and acquiring a pet that could outweigh you comes with obvious challenges.

Grooming Tips

The Newfoundland's heavy coat requires thorough brushing at least once a week. A thorough going-over with a slicker brush and a long-toothed comb will remove dead hair and prevent mats from forming. These will become daily sessions during shedding season, which generally occurs twice a year; however, spayed and neutered Newfs shed year-round and will probably need to be brushed out several times a week. As with all breeds, the nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can cause discomfort and structural problems.

Newfypoo (Newfoundland Dog + Poodle) Breed

 

Newfypoos are crossbred dogs between the Standard Poodle and the Newfoundland. The two combined breeds have great traits including character (temperament), appearance, which the Newfypoos have inherited. Intelligent, playful and very trainable, the Newfypoos have other several names including Newdle, Newfiepoo, Newfydoodle, Newfydoo, Newfiedoodle, Newfiedoo, Newfoundlandoodle, Poofoundland, Newfoundlandpoo, Newfoundland Doodle, Newfoundland Poodle Mix, and Newfy Poodle Mix.
Most Newfypoos are known to inherit the hypoallergenic coat of the Poodle and the Newfoundland's great strength and desire to work. Newfoundland Doodle dogs are suitable for families with large backyards where they can expend their excess energy through various activities. Newfy Poodle mix dogs are not ideal for people living in apartments or condos. Since Newfypoos are friendly and outgoing, they will get along well with people of all ages including the young and the old.
Charming and quick to learn, Newfoundland Poodle mix pups will also require early training and socialization to maintain good behavior. Newfoundland Poodle cross pups will need to be showered with lots of love and attention by their handlers.
Given that Newfypoo dpgs are hybrid dogs, it is not quite easy to determine which parental genetics will be favored in your dog. They can either be more of Poodles, more of the Newfoundland's while some will be somewhere in between the two. Whichever the case be sure your dog will be gentle, smart and very friendly.

Grooming Tips

Brushing your Newfypoo: Brush your Newfypoos coat thoroughly before you start bathing the dog. This will help untangle the dogs' fur as well as get rid of any embedded dirt. A slicker brush should work well in this case. Using the wrong brush can inflict your dog with excruciating pain as well as cause sores in the skin.
Get rid of tangles with a clipper: Begin clipping your Newfypoos coat in areas that are not easily maneuvered. This will help you comb the coat well since you will have gotten rid of knots and mats. Do the exercise with specialized clippers meant for Newfypoos as well as a comb that can be used afterward.
Bathing your Newfypoo: Bathing your dog should always happen once every few months. Do not bathe your dog with too hot or cold water, the water should be in the lukewarm state and always test the water temperature before you begin.
Scrub the coat using dogs' shampoo and afterward rinse the coat thoroughly. This will allow you to see the Newfoundland Poodle dog's coat clearly and decide how you wish to trim it. Drying your pooch: Dry the dog's coat well before you start trimming it. Use a clean, dry towel to rub the coat and get rid of any excess moisture in it. You can as well let the dog shake itself to get rid of the remaining moisture as the coat air dries.
Given that Newfypoo pups are prone to ear infections, it's always advisable to dry the dog's ears thoroughly after bath or after swimming and get rid of any wax build-up and dirt. If you notice a bad smell from the ears or the ears look red and inflamed inside then the dog may need to see the vet to help clear the ear infection that is common for this hybrid.
Newfypoo's eyes should be cleaned regularly. Wipe the dogs' eyes with a soft cloth at each corner carefully to get rid of any dirt.
Newfypoo dog dental care. Maintaining your dog's dental hygiene is very significant, this will prevent bacteria and other plagues. Dog-friendly toothpaste and toothbrushes are recommended for this exercise, which should be done frequently. Although in some dogs the exercise may be a bit challenging if the dog doesn't like being still and opening their mouth.
Newfypoo's nails grow quickly and will need occasional clipping. They should not be felt scratching on the floor, neither should they begin growing inwards. This can cause a lot of pain and discomfort. Use nail clippers for dogs otherwise one may end up overcutting or clipping the nails too short, which may cause the dog a lot of pain and discomfort.

Norfolk Terrier Breed

 

Norfolk Terriers are little, cute, and loyal, and they will gladly curl up in your lap, but don't dare call them lapdogs. Norfolks, despite their toyish qualities, are genuine terriers'¿feisty, confident, sturdy, and game for adventure. Norfolk Terriers are among the smallest working terriers, standing no higher than 10 inches at the shoulder. The coat is hard, wiry, and straight. They share many traits with their close cousins, Norwich Terriers. To tell them apart, look at the ears: The Norwich has erect, pointed ears; Norfolk ears are neatly folded over. Bred to work in packs, Norfolks are more gregarious than a typical terrier, but they have plenty of the old terrier pep. Few Norfolks these days earn their living hunting rodents, but a good one will fearlessly do so when given a chance. Norfolks bond closely, sometimes jealously, with their owners and make nice watchdogs. They have a reputation as a good traveler: portable, adaptable, and up for anything.

Grooming Tips

A Norfolk Terrier should have a double coat consisting of a hard outer coat and a soft undercoat that insulates the body from heat and cold. Hand-stripping removes old outer hairs and excess undercoat so that new hair can grow in. Wire coats that are cared for properly by hand-stripping have a beautiful shine and rich color. Learning to hand-strip, or finding a groomer who will hand-strip, is an important consideration in choosing this breed.

Norrbottenspets Breed

 

The Norrbottenspets is a small, slightly rectangular spitzdog, well poised, with sinewy and well-developed muscles. Alert with head carried high, they have a fearless attitude and are extremely agile. They are calm, keen, and attentive, with a kind disposition. Nobs aren't large dogs (a big male stands a shade below 20 inches) but their tough, sinewy bodies are built to withstand punishing terrain and harsh climates. They are a small-sized hunting dog of Spitz-type, which was thought to be extinct but survived as a farm and hunting dog in the Northern parts of Sweden and Finland. To be able to navigate the rough terrain and climate of the Scandinavian forests and hold large dangerous game, like moose, Norrbottenspets evolved to be extremely agile, rugged, and weatherproof with a fearless attitude, while at the same time kind and affectionate companions at home. They exhibit no extremes in physical characteristics because they must do all things well.

Grooming Tips

The Norrbottenspets is double-coated with a topcoat that is hard, short, and straight and an undercoat that is fine and dense. They are very clever and clean dogs, with no offensive smell. Beyond regular weekly grooming, the very occasional bath will keep them clean and looking their best. Their nails should be trimmed when necessary with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting, and cracking. Ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed when needed.

Norwegian Buhund Breed

 

The densely coated Nowegian Buhund, a Nordic spitz-type closely associated with the Vikings, is a medium-sized cold-weather worker adept at herding and guarding. As family dogs, Buhunds are smart, affectionate, and steadfastly devoted. The Buhund, a prototypical spitz, provides a good opportunity to explain the term. Spitz are cold-weather breeds characterized by a dense coat, a tail curved tightly over the back, a wedge-shaped head, and erect, pointed ears ('spitz' means 'pointed' in ancient German). They can be pint-sized like Pomeranians, mighty like Malamutes, or mid-sized like the lithe but sturdy Buhund. Males can stand 18.5 inches high and weight up to 40 pounds. Coat colors are wheaten or black.

Grooming Tips

Compared to other breeds, Norwegian Buhunds do not need extensive grooming. They are naturally clean and basically odorless dogs, even when wet. The Buhund has a double coat: an outer coat that is thick, rich, hard, and smooth lying, and a soft, dense, and woolly undercoat. The coat sheds most foreign substances with ease, and dries itself after a bath. Buhunds do need to be brushed two to three times a week, and more often during the shedding season'¿like other double-coated dogs, Buhunds blow their undercoats once or twice a year. As with all breeds, the nails should be trimmed regularly.

Norwegian Elkhound Breed

 

The Norwegian Elkhound is a robust spitz type known for his lush silver-gray coat and dignified but friendly demeanor. The durable Elkhound is among Europe's oldest dogs. They sailed with the Vikings and figure in Norse art and legend. Norwegian Elkhounds are hardy, short-bodied dogs standing about 20 inches at the shoulder. They have a dense silver-gray coat and a tail curling tightly over the back. The deep chest, sturdy legs, and muscular thighs belong to a dog built for an honest day's work. The eyes are a dark brown and the ears mobile and erect. Overall, an Elkhound is the picture of an alert and steadfast dog of the north. Elkhounds are famously fine companions and intelligent watchdogs. Agility and herding trials are good outlets for their natural athleticism and eagerness. Reserved until introductions are made, an Elkhound is a trustworthy friend ever after. These strong, confident dogs are truly sensitive souls, with a dash of houndy independence.

Grooming Tips

The Norwegian Elkhound has a 'two-ply' coat, with a top coat and an undercoat. Elkhound breeders warn potential puppy buyers of the inevitable'¿that during shedding season they will have 'tumbleweeds' of silver undercoat rolling around their house. The outer coat will shed as well, but not to the degree that the undercoat will. A slicker brush will help you keep the fur storm under control. Five minutes a day of 'back-brushing' (brushing in the opposite direction to which the coat lies) will take care of the problem for most of the year. Daily maintenance of just two minutes a day at other times will keep the coat beautiful, and will give your vacuum a new lease on life! Elkhounds do not have a doggy smell, due to the harshness of the coat. A bath two to three times a year for the family pet is perfect and helps the dead coat to fall out and new, healthy hair to grow in.

Norwegian Lundehund Breed

 

From Norway's rocky island of Vaeroy, the uniquely constructed Norwegian Lundehund is the only dog breed created for the job of puffin hunting. With puffins now a protected species, today's Lundehund is a friendly, athletic companion. At a glance, Lundehunds seem a typical northern breed: A spitz type with triangular ears, curving tail, and a dense double coat. But a closer look reveals several unique traits. They have feet with at least six fully functioning toes and extra paw pads, an 'elastic neck' that can crane back so the head touches the spine, ears that fold shut, and flexible shoulders that allow forelegs to extend to the side, perpendicular to the body. This last anomaly produces the breed's distinctive 'rotary' gait.

Grooming Tips

The Norwegian Lundehund has a low-maintenance double coat, with a harsh outer coat and a dense, soft undercoat. A weekly brushing will help to remove dirt and loose hair and keep the dog looking his best. The ears should be regularly inspected and cleaned if needed. The nails should be trimmed often if not worn down naturally, as overly long nails can cause the dog discomfort and problems walking and running.

Norwich Terrier Breed

 

Norwich Terriers are plucky little earthdogs named for their hometown in England. The old cliche "a big dog in a small package" was coined for breeds like the Norwich, who can be oblivious to the fact that they are just 10 inches tall. Standing no more than 10 inches at the shoulder and weighing about 12 pounds, Norwich are among the smallest working terriers. Beneath the hard, wiry coat is a stocky, substantial dog. Norwiches are toy-sized but are not satin-pillow dogs' they were originally bred as tough and fearless ratters. They are distinguished from their doggy doppelganger, the Norfolk Terrier, by their erect, pointed ears. Happy-go-lucky, fearless, and sometimes even bossy, Norwiches are energetic enough to play fetch all day, but affectionate enough to enjoy hours of lap time with their favorite human. Short, positive training sessions work best with this clever but sometimes stubborn breed. Three words convey the overall dog: cute, cuter, and cutest.

Grooming Tips

A Norwich Terrier should have a double coat consisting of a harsh, nearly weatherproof outer coat, and a soft undercoat that insulates the body from heat and cold. Hand-stripping removes old outer hairs and excess undercoat so that new hair grows in. Wire coats that are cared for properly by hand-stripping have a beautiful shine and rich colors. Because clipping or scissoring cuts the colored tips off, the natural color will fade, and the texture will soften. The breed requires regular grooming. Learning to hand-strip, or finding a groomer who will hand-strip, is an important consideration in choosing this breed.

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever Breed

 

The smallest of the AKC's retrievers, the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is intelligent, affectionate, and eager to please. Play fetch with a tireless Toller until your right arm falls off, and he will ask you to throw left-handed. The little gundog with the big name is the smallest AKC retriever, standing ideally 18 or 19 inches at the shoulder. The Toller's trademark is a coat of stunning crimson, ranging from golden red to a dark coppery color, with white markings. Strong and agile, Tollers are medium dogs: medium in size, bone, and coat length. The almond-shaped eyes project an alert expression. Tollers are upbeat athletes who require outlets for their boundless vigor: hunting, hiking, camping, and, of course, swimming (for which they are ideally suited, down to their webbed feet). Tollers are smart, handsome, affectionate companions, but these red tornadoes can be recommended only to those with enough time and energy to keep them usefully occupied.

Grooming Tips

Tollers require weekly brushing to keep their coat looking its best. During shedding season, daily brushing is often in order. Pay special attention to the coat around and under the ears, as in these areas it is finer and more likely to knot. Because Tollers should be presented as naturally as possible, minimal additional grooming is preferred, and this is generally limited to neatening the areas around the ears and feet. Special care should be taken to remove excess hair from between the pads of the feet, as this will help your Toller maintain traction on indoor surfaces. Attention should also be paid to trimming nails, preferably weekly.

Old English Sheepdog Breed

 

The Old English Sheepdog is the archetypical shaggy dog, famous for his profuse coat and peak-a-boo hairdo, a distinctive bear-like gait, and a mellow, agreeable nature. The OES is a big, agile dog who enjoys exploring and a good romp. Beneath the Old English Sheepdog's profuse double coat is a muscular and compact drover, with plenty of bone and a big rump, standing 21 or 22 inches at the shoulder. Their eyes (when you can see them) are dark brown, or blue, or one of each. The OES breed standard says the skull is 'capacious and rather squarely formed, giving plenty of room for brain power.' OES move with a bear-like shuffle but are famous for their nimbleness afoot. Regular exercise is required for these strong, able-bodied workers. Equally famed are their many fine housedog qualities: watchfulness, courage, kindliness, and intelligence. Great with children, OES make patient, protective playmates. They are sensible watchdogs known for a loud, ringing bark.

Grooming Tips

The coat is what attracts most people to the Old English Sheepdog. The breed is double-coated and requires a thorough grooming down to the skin, over the entire dog, at least weekly to maintain their full coats. "Puppy trims" are good options for pet dogs, but they also require regular brushing between baths and haircuts. Keeping the feet clipped ('Poodle feet') will minimize problems and cleanup. Potential owners need to be prepared to spend the time required to do this, or pay a professional groomer, for several sessions each month for the life of the dog. As with all breeds, the nails should be trimmed regularly.

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Otterhound Breed

 

Big, boisterous, and affectionate, the Otterhound was bred in medieval England for the now-outlawed activity of otter hunting. This scarce breed is known for his dense shaggy coat, webbed feet, acute sense of smell, and affinity for swimming. These big, bouncy hounds were ideally suited for otter hunting. OHs are built to be expert swimmers, from the top of their rough, waterproof coat to the bottom of their big webbed feet. A broad chest and powerful shoulders allow them to swim all day without tiring. Their large black nose is amazingly sensitive and could follow an otter's underwater scent trail over great distances. And the OH's size and strength enabled them to take on a sharp-toothed, razor-clawed otter that might weigh 20 pounds.

Grooming Tips

While Otterhounds should be shown as naturally as possible, their coats do need brushing once or twice a week, depending on length and texture. A good slicker brush and medium comb work for this. The Otterhound's beard may need cleaning at the same time, since the dogs tend to drag them on the ground and store snacks in them. Nails should be trimmed every week or two.

Papillon Breed

 

The quick, curious Papillon is a toy dog of singular beauty and upbeat athleticism. Despite his refined appearance, the Pap is truly a 'doggy dog' blessed with a hardy constitution. Papillon fanciers describe their breed as happy, alert, and friendly. A tiny dog, measuring 8 to 11 inches at the shoulder, you can still spot a Papillon a block away thanks to the large, wing-shaped ears that give the breed its name ('papillon' is French for 'butterfly'). Some Paps have erect ears; in others, known as the Phalene type, the ears are down. Paps are dainty and elegant, with a plumed tail, and a long, silky coat of several color combinations, the base color being white. More robust than they look, Paps are little dogs for all seasons and reasons. They thrive in warm or cool climates, in town or country, and are eager to join family fun. They are excellent agility dogs and are consistent winners at the sport's highest levels; less ambitious owners can train them to do all kinds of tricks.

Grooming Tips

For a breed with long, silky hair, Papillons needs surprisingly little grooming, mostly because they do not have an undercoat. Grooming every month or so is fine. Between full grooming sessions, you might want to spend a few minutes running a comb or soft slicker brush through the hair inside the hind legs, behind the ears, and on the "culottes," or thigh hair, as mats tend to form there. A Papillon will need a bath every few months, or when he or she gets especially muddy or dirty. The Papillon's nails grow quickly and should be trimmed regularly'¿especially the dewclaw, which can curl around and pierce the leg. Finally, regular tooth brushing is vital for dental health.

Parson Jack Russell Terrier Breed

 

A wire-haired Jack Russell Terrier is going to have longer hair, often growing in different directions, and known for those Jack Russell Terrier moustaches you often see in pictures or even on television. Smooth coat Jack Russells have a shiny, clean look to their coat but do not be fooled; they are known to be heavier shedders and require grooming work as well. Source Wire-haired Jack Russells have short and rough coats. They have the same characteristics as smooth-coated Jack Russells. The only difference is their coat type, which is between 1 and 2 inches long. They have a messy lovable appearance. Source

Grooming Tips:

1. Brushing: Brushing is the most important aspect of grooming a Jack Russell Terrier, and the main purpose is to help the dog develop a hard, water repellent coat. Start by brushing or combing the dog’s entire body using a wide-toothed comb. Daily brushing with a slicker brush is necessary when the dog blows the coat, (the shedding of excess hair naturally). This type of brush has a rubber cushion embedded with fine, metal pins, and will remove the hairs of the undercoat as soon as they are loose or almost ready to drop.
2. Bathing: Shampoo is detrimental to the rough-coated Jack Russell as it softens the hair, according to the Jack Russell Terrier Club of America, and the dogs benefit from a dry shampoo instead. Mix equal parts of cornstarch with baby powder, work it into the dog’s coat and brush it out thoroughly. However, if your dog is especially dirty and you need to give them a full bath, use a high-quality dog shampoo made especially for rough-coated dogs.
3. Stripping: Strip the Jack Russell Terrier’s undercoat twice a year as part of the grooming process. This is best done when the dog is blowing the coat. Once you have combed all loose hair and dust from the coat, separate the remaining hair into sections and examine each section to ensure all dead hairs have been removed. Pluck these out one hair at a time, as this removes the dead hair shaft from the dog’s skin and allows for even growth of new hairs. You can also do this using a stripping knife, which removes several dead hairs at a time.
4. Trimming: The Jack Russell Terrier needs very little trimming. Trim the loose hair around the dog’s face with a pair of blunt scissors, and avoid removing more than a little. Leave eyebrow hairs and whiskers around the dog’s mouth, and trim just enough to balance the face evenly on both sides. Source

Peekapoo (Pekingese + Poodle) Breed

 

Peekapoo is a designer crossbreed dog produced by crossing a Pekingese with a Poodle. Being a great companion dog, Pekingese Poodle mix dog just loves sitting next to the owners on the floor or on their laps. The search for a low-shedding dog and loyal companion and partner led to the creation of Peekapoo. Peekapoo dog also goes by the following names: Peke-A-Poo, Pekepoo and Pekapoo. If you are looking for a loyal companion dog that is full of fun, and you don't mind the above average grooming needs of Peekapoo, the Pekingese Poodle mix could become your best friend for many years to come.Peekapoo was designed for individuals suffering from allergies. Designer dogs are very unique, in that one can actually be long-coated and be a moderate shedder of dander and hair, which sets off one's allergy. Although "Doodle" designer dogs are not completely free from pet produced allergens, the affectionate and intelligent Peekapoo has stolen the hearts of many people, which is why Poodle and Pekingese cross dog has found his way in many laps and homes. The Pekingese Poodle mix is now being successfully used as a therapy dog.
The Peekapoo is an excellent dog that will bark loudly at the sight of anything or anyone suspicious. Residential environments that have noise restrictions are not ideal for the Pekingese Poodle mix. Peekapoo barks very loudly despite his tiny body. The Peekapoo has inherited the affectionate and friendly trait from the Pekingese parent, and hypoallergenic and intelligent traits from the Poodle parent to form a well-rounded companion dog.
Peekapoo is a great dog breed that thrives very well in any home environment, where an apartment or a home with a fenced yard in the countryside. Peke Poodle mix dog definitely likes playing a lot and would thus prefer to be in a fenced-yard home, but should never be left outside unsupervised or even let to live outdoors. When in an apartment environment, it would be great for you to have an air conditioner. This is because being a flat-faced (brachycephalic), Peke-a-poo is likely to quickly succumb to heat exhaustion. The Peekapoo needs to be exposed to sufficient exercise (avoid excessive exercise during hot or humid weather); at least a good session of play around the yard and a few walks around the block each day. If you fail to do this consistently, the high energy levels of this dog could be converted into destructive behaviors.

Grooming Tips

Potential Peekapoo owners need to be prepared to spend a lot of time and in some cases money to properly care for their pet's luxurious coat. With an almost cottony texture, the Peekapoo's coat has a soft feel. Peekapoo's coat can be from moderate to long lengths and is naturally wavy. Although the initial objective of creating this dog was to produce low-shedding dogs, Pekingese Poodle mixes shedding range varies from low to moderately high, depending on how the genetic dice rolls.
As mentioned earlier, Peekapoo's nature of being first generation of purebred dogs doesn't have a perfect blend of the two parents in most scenarios. This also includes color, in that, the Pekingese Poodle mix may have several markings such as phantom (black with markings of tan), or a solid color or even a variety of coat colors.
To be tangle-free and healthy, Peekapoos' coats need to be groomed regularly. In addition to Peekapoo's coat maintenance, grooming a Peekapoo dog includes keeping the wrinkled face of the dog clean from dirt and bacteria. The facial folds need to be cleaned daily to prevent an onset of any infection that can occur in these areas if neglected. Although regular bathing and brushing are needed for a Peekapoo, you can keep him clipped to ease the process of caring for him. Keeping Peekapoo's hair long can be a lot of maintenance work that includes brusing the hair on daily basis to prevent matting and tangling. Long hair can also make your Peekapoo have more frequent eye irritations. If you don't want to clip the entire coat hair, just trim the fur causing disturbance to his eyes.

Pekingese Breed

 

The Pekingese, a compact toy companion of regal bearing and a distinctive rolling gait, is one of several breeds created for the ruling classes of ancient China. These are sophisticated dogs of undying loyalty and many subtle delights. Pekingese are compact, stocky toy dogs weighing up to 14 pounds. The coat is longest at the neck and shoulders, giving Pekes their famous 'lion's mane.' Coats come in various reds, from a golden-red to darker shades. The large, short-muzzled head is a wider-than-long 'envelope shaped' rectangle, and the eyes are large, dark, and sparkly. A unique feature of Pekes is their effortless 'rolling' gait. Pekes are charming, confident companions who develop a tight bond with their favorite human. Bred to live in palaces, they can be as serenely independent as the emperors who owned them. (They're 'opinionated,' Peke people say.) Ever alert, they make good watchdogs. Pekes will tolerate kids but won't stand for a lot of roughhousing.

Grooming Tips

The thick double coat of the Pekingese requires a good bit of maintenance. Pekingese shed seasonally. Brushing him at least one hour per week will help to remove loose hairs and prevent matting, and an occasional bath will help to keep him looking his best. Mats or tangles can be gently worked out with a slicker brush or metal comb. As with all breeds, the nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can cause the dog discomfort.

Pembroke Welsh Corgi Breed

 

Among the most agreeable of all small housedogs, the Pembroke Welsh Corgi is a strong, athletic, and lively little herder who is affectionate and companionable without being needy. They are one the world's most popular herding breeds. At 10 to 12 inches at the shoulder and 27 to 30 pounds, a well-built male Pembroke presents a big dog in a small package. Short but powerful legs, muscular thighs, and a deep chest equip him for a hard day's work. Built long and low, Pembrokes are surprisingly quick and agile. They can be red, sable, fawn, and black and tan, with or without white markings. The Pembroke is a bright, sensitive dog who enjoys play with his human family and responds well to training. As herders bred to move cattle, they are fearless and independent. They are vigilant watchdogs, with acute senses and a 'big dog' bark. Families who can meet their bold but kindly Pembroke's need for activity and togetherness will never have a more loyal, loving pet.

Grooming Tips

The Pembroke has a thick, weatherproof double coat'¿a soft, light undercoat covered by a coarse outer coat. The breed sheds a fair amount on a daily basis, and even more so in the late spring/early summer. A daily once-over with a comb and a slicker brush will remove a lot of the shed hair before it is all over the house. During shedding season, baths help to loosen the dead hairs'¿the dog must be completely dry before brushing begins'¿and a rake helps strip out the undercoat. As with all breeds, the Corgi's nails should be trimmed regularly, and ears checked to be sure they are clean and healthy.

Perra de Presa Canario Breed

 

The Perro de Presa Canario has a calm appearance and attentive expression. He is especially suited to guarding and traditionally used for herding cattle. A moderately large-sized molossoid, with a rectilinear profile and black mask, the Perro de Presa Canario is robust and well-proportioned. With a low, deep bark, he has a balanced temperament and is very self-confident. Obedient and docile with family members, he is very devoted to his master, but can be suspicious of strangers. When alert, his stance is firm and vigilant.

Grooming Tips

Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep the Presa Canario clean and looking their best. Their strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting, and cracking. Ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

Peruvian Inca Orchid Breed

 

Agile, smart and swift, the Peruvian Inca Orchid is an elegant sighthound that developed in Peru. The breed can be hairless or coated, and comes in three sizes: small, medium and large. Lively and alert, these dogs can be very good hunters and do well in lure coursing, rally and agility. In the hairless variety, the skin can be of any color. In the coated variety, all colors are accepted including black, brown, gray, pink, tan and white. These affectionate companion dogs are essentially sighthounds (think Greyhounds and Whippets) and have the same elegant contours of their racy cousins. PIOs come in a range of sizes: the smallest might stand just short of 10 inches; the largest top out at nearly 26 inches. Their distinguishing feature is, of course, hairlessness. The delicate skin can be a solid color or spotted with unpigmented areas. Coated PIOs are in the minority, and the coated and hairless varieties can occur in the same littler. Going by his general conformation, it is an elegant and slim dog, whose aspect expresses speed, strength and harmony without ever appearing coarse. Another particular feature is that the dentition in the hairless variety is nearly always incomplete, associated with the congenital alopecia. Noble and affectionate at home with those close to him, he is at the same time lively and alert. He might be wary of strangers and is a good watch dog. The breed is loyal and protective of his family, but like all dogs, should be supervised around younger children. Caution should also be taken with small pets that may be seen as prey.

Grooming Tips

These are not outdoor dogs and require sunscreen on sunny days. Beyond regular grooming, the occasional bath will keep your Peruvian Inca Orchid clean and looking his best. Their nails can be trimmed when needed with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting, and cracking. Ears should be checked occasionally to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed when needed.

Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen Breed

 

The low-slung, shaggy-coated Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen is a vivacious French rabbit-hunting hound known for a happy demeanor and durable constitution. Bred to work in a pack, PBGVs enjoy company and do well with other dogs and kids. A loose translation of the name describes the dog well: Petit (small), Basset (low), Griffon (shaggy), Vendéen (from the Vendée region of France). Put it all together and you have a diminutive hound, standing 13 to 15 inches at the shoulder, with short but strong legs and a rough tousled coat, bred to hunt rabbits on the rugged west coast of France. Other distinctive features of these little extroverts are a proudly carried head, a saber tail, and a loud, houndy bark.

Grooming Tips

The coat of a PBGV is one of its most distinctive qualities, but can be a source of frustration for those unaccustomed to dealing with it. It should be harsh and thick'¿some liken it to the hair of a goat. Your PBGV should have a complete brushing-out at least weekly. After brushing, you should be able to run a comb through the coat easily. Trimming should be kept to a minimum. The PBGV's tousled appearance is part of his charm. Most people follow a bathing/grooming routine on a monthly basis, which includes a good, thorough bath and a nail trim. The ears should be checked weekly, and any excess wax and debris should be removed to avoid infections.

Pharaoh Hound Breed

 

The Pharaoh Hound, ancient "Blushing Dog" of Malta, is an elegant but rugged sprinting hound bred to course small game over punishing terrain. Quick and tenacious on scent, these friendly, affectionate hounds settle down nicely at home. Pharaohs are sleek, aerodynamic coursing hounds bred for high-speed pursuit on rocky terrain. Among their several distinguishing traits are a tight tan coat with matching leather on the nose, ears, and eye rims; ravishing amber eyes; a white-tipped tail; the ability to smile; and a unique way of blushing when happy or excited ('His face glows like a god,' wrote an admirer some 3,000 years ago). These elegant visitors from antiquity possess the speed and graceful movement of all coursers descended from Bronze Age hounds.

Grooming Tips

Pharaoh Hounds do not require a great deal of grooming. Daily light brushing or a heavier weekly brushing will do, with baths given as necessary. Particular attention should be paid to keeping the ears clean, and keeping the nails trimmed short enough that they do not make a tapping sound when the dog walks across the floor. Teeth should be cleaned at home on a regular basis but also should be checked by your veterinarian when the dog has his yearly checkup. Pharaohs do not normally have a 'doggy odor,' so if an odor is present, check him to find the cause.

Pit Boodle (Pitbull + Poodle) Breed

 

The Pitbull Poodle mix is also known as the Pit Boodle. An unusual combination of a Pitbull and a Poodle, this designer dog is a highly active and muscular dog that’s loyal and easily trainable. They have both the strength of the Pitbull and the intelligence of the Poodle.
This mix has the potential to be a great family companion, depending on how they’re brought up. With the right care, socialization, and training, you can be sure that the Pit Boodle will be a wonderful companion even for kids! Aside from being a great family dog, the Pitbull Poodle mix is also known for its adaptability and instinct for obedience.How the Pitbull Poodle mix will look when fully grown is very unpredictable since Pitbulls and Poodles are built very differently. Pitbulls are muscular which shows their strength while Poodles are slender and exude elegance.
But whether a Pit Boodle puppy will inherit more traits from its Pitbull or Poodle parent, some traits are predictable. These will let you know what to expect from Pit Boodle puppies.

Grooming Tips

Your Pit Boodle’s grooming requirements will depend completely on which parent it inherits most of its traits from. Pitties have a short coat and do not need much grooming, but Poodles are known for their tight curly hair that requires proper grooming sessions.
If your Pitbull Poodle mix inherited most of its Pittie parent’s genes, all your pup would need is a brush two to three times a week. Baths can also be given only when your pup really needs them.On the other hand, Poodle genes will require a lot more of your attention. Your pup will need more brushing to avoid the hair from matting.
You will need some good-quality brushes for this. Aside from that, your Pit Boodle will also need the best shampoo for his skin type and hair.
As part of the grooming routine, you will also need to make sure that your dog’s dental hygiene, nails, and ears are maintained properly. You will need to brush your pup’s teeth daily to prevent any dental problems.
Make sure no water enters your dog’s ears when bathing, as this can cause ear infections. A good practice is to always make sure that the ears are clean and dry.

Pointer Breed

 

The Pointer is the ultimate expression of canine power and grace. The breed's name is its job description: Pointers point game birds, and they have been pointing for centuries. The high-energy Pointer is an excellent runner's companion. The noble Pointer is the ultimate expression of canine power and grace. Unquestioned aristocrats of the sporting world, Pointers carry themselves proudly and are capable of great speed and agility. The coat comes in several colors, solid or in patterns'¿but as the breed's devotees like to say, a good Pointer can't be a bad color. A large male can stand 28 inches at the shoulder and weigh up to 75 pounds; a small female might weigh as little as 45 pounds and stand 23 inches.

Grooming Tips

The Pointer's short, dense, glossy coat requires minimal maintenance. A weekly brushing with a soft-bristle brush or a hound glove will help to remove dirt and loose hair and keep the dog looking his best. The ears should be regularly inspected and cleaned if needed with soft gauze and an ear-cleaning solution'¿your veterinarian can recommend a good brand to use. The nails should be trimmed often if not worn down naturally, as overly long nails can cause the dog discomfort and problems walking and running.

Polish Lowland Sheepdog Breed

 

A shaggy-coated herding dog who thrives on exercise and hard work, the Polish Lowland Sheepdog is clever, confident, and a bit stubborn. Compact, alert, and adaptable, they are beloved companions and watchdogs of Polish city dwellers. First, about that nickname: PON is the acronym for the Polish breed name, Polski Owczarek Nizinny. PONs aren't particularly large dogs, standing no more than 20 inches at the shoulder, but they are muscular and stocky. The rectangular body is covered head to toe with a double coat'¿long and shaggy on top, soft and dense below, and it comes in several colors. The head's profuse coat covers the eyes, which convey the keen, penetrating gaze so common in watchdogs and herders.

Grooming Tips

The PON's shaggy, thick, double coat requires a lot of maintenance. The outer coat is crisp, with a water-resistant texture, and the undercoat is soft and dense. A PON kept in full coat will need to be thoroughly brushed at least once a week. A PON who is kept in a puppy or 'summer' clip will still need routine brushing to keep the coat free of mats and debris such as grass, weeds, and flower blooms. The ears will also need to be checked weekly and cleaned if needed, and the nails trimmed.

Pomeranian Breed

 

The tiny Pomeranian, long a favorite of royals and commoners alike, has been called the ideal companion. The glorious coat, smiling, foxy face, and vivacious personality have helped make the Pom one of the world's most popular toy breeds. ¿The Pomeranian combines a tiny body (no more than seven pounds) and a commanding big-dog demeanor. The abundant double coat, with its frill extending over the chest and shoulders, comes in almost two dozen colors, and various patterns and markings, but is most commonly seen in orange or red. Alert and intelligent, Pomeranians are easily trained and make fine watchdogs and perky pets for families with children old enough to know the difference between a toy dog and a toy. Poms are active but can be exercised with indoor play and short walks, so they are content in both the city and suburbs. They will master tricks and games with ease, though their favorite activity is providing laughs and companionship to their special human.

Grooming Tips

The Pomeranian's profuse double coat is one of his most distinguishing features. Frequent brushing is necessary to maintain the beautiful coat that we admire. Brush through the dog with a pin brush and a slicker brush down to the skin once a week to keep the hair from matting. Pomeranians are active dogs, so it is important that their nails are kept short. It is highly recommended that you find a groomer to do a full groom'¿including bath, brushing, ears, nails, and anal glands'¿every four to six weeks, if you are not comfortable with doing this at home. You should also pay close attention to the Pom's teeth. It is a good idea to brush the teeth during their weekly grooming session.

Poochon (Bichon Frise + Poodle) Breed

 

It is said that Poochons were first bred in Australia in the 1990s when breeders were looking to create a hybrid that had the loving and playful nature of the bichon frise and the trainability and intelligence of the Poodle. The result is the Poochon, a trainable, highly adaptable little dog whose coat is hypoallergenic and low-shedding, making it the perfect choice for people with allergies.
They are internationally known as Poochon and sometimes Bichpoo, yet also go by Bichdoodle, Bichoodle, Bichon-Poo, Bichondoodle. Poochon is considered a new breed
Poochon Appearance, Coat, Size, and Weight
A Poochon looks like a canine teddy bear! With a tiny muzzle, cute small hanging ears, and adorable teddy-like paws topped by an amazing curly coat, Poochons are irresistible.
Inheriting the puffy coat from the Bichon Frise parent and the curly coat from its Poodle parent, Poochons have a curly or wavy coat and the best thing is, they are hypoallergenic! Poochon colors can vary greatly from apricot, cream, white, or any combination of the colors from the Poodle parent.
The Poochon is a small dog since bichons frises are small dogs and Poochons are usually crossed with a Toy or Miniature Poodle, not the Standard Poodle. They stand at 9 to 15 inches tall and can weigh from 6 to 17 pounds.

Grooming Tips

Although Poochons are low-shedding, their thick curly coat needs to be brushed at least four to five times a week to prevent it from getting matted or tangled.
Apart from the brushing, you need to give your baby a bath every two to three weeks with shampoo, and often check them for fleas and insects, especially in their ears and the area behind the ears.
The next thing you should be doing is grooming, and to preserve the pooches’ teddy bear appearance, you might have to make a trip to a professional groomer every six to eight weeks for a haircut.
You need to clip their nails every two to four weeks or so especially if your pooch doesn’t walk outside often, to prevent the nails from getting long and hurting their little paws. Nail clipping is easily done at home or the groomers.
Poochons are also prone to tear stains and eye infections. Help your Poochon clean its eyes from tear stains by wiping your Poochon’s face around the eyes every day to keep your puppy’s face looking adorable while also protecting them from an eye infection.
Your Poochon is also likely to have floppy ears that need more regular cleaning. Use a vet-approved ear cleaning solution to remove any buildup of wax and debris to keep ear infections at bay.

Poodle (Miniature) Breed

 

Whether Standard, Miniature, or Toy, and either black, white, or apricot, the Poodle stands proudly among dogdom's true aristocrats. Beneath the curly, hypoallergenic coat is an elegant athlete and companion for all reasons and seasons. Poodles come in three size varieties: Standards should be more than 15 inches tall at the shoulder; Miniatures are 15 inches or under; Toys stand no more than 10 inches. All three varieties have the same build and proportions. At dog shows, Poodles are usually seen in the elaborate Continental clip. Most pet owners prefer the simpler Sporting clip, in which the coat is shorn to follow the outline of the squarely built, smoothly muscled body. Forget any preconceived notions about Poodles you may have: Poodles are eager, athletic, and wickedly smart dogs of remarkable versatility. The Standard, with his greater size and strength, is the best all-around athlete of the family, but all Poodles can be trained with great success.

Grooming Tips

Unless you plan to keep your Poodle clipped in a short trim, you will need to learn how to brush him daily to keep his coat from matting. If you do not brush and comb a full-coated Poodle completely to the skin, the hair will mat near the roots and will have to be shaved off to start all over with new growth. Most pet owners opt to keep the Poodle in a shorter trim. Some owners learn to do this clipping and trimming themselves, while others choose to take their dog to a professional dog groomer every four to six weeks for a bath, grooming, and nail trim. The breed's relatively non-shedding coat makes the breed a good choice for people with allergies.

Poodle (Standard) Breed

 

Whether Standard, Miniature, or Toy, and either black, white, or apricot, the Poodle stands proudly among dogdom¿s true aristocrats. Beneath the curly, low-allergen coat is an elegant athlete and companion for all reasons and seasons. Poodles come in three size varieties: Standards should be more than 15 inches tall at the shoulder; Miniatures are 15 inches or under; Toys stand no more than 10 inches. All three varieties have the same build and proportions. At dog shows, Poodles are usually seen in the elaborate Continental clip. Most pet owners prefer the simpler Sporting clip, in which the coat is shorn to follow the outline of the squarely built, smoothly muscled body. Forget any preconceived notions about Poodles you may have: Poodles are eager, athletic, and wickedly smart dogs of remarkable versatility. The Standard, with his greater size and strength, is the best all-around athlete of the family, but all Poodles can be trained with great success.

Grooming Tips

Unless you plan to keep your Poodle clipped in a short trim, you will need to learn how to brush how to brush him daily to keep his coat from matting. If you do not brush and comb a full-coated Poodle completely to the skin, the hair will mat near the roots and will have to be shaved off to start all over with new growth. Most pet owners opt to keep the Poodle in a shorter trim. Some owners learn to do this clipping and trimming themselves, while others choose to take their dog to a professional dog groomer every four to six weeks for a bath, grooming, and nail trim. The breed¿s relatively nonshedding coat makes the breed a good choice for people with allergies.

Poodle (Toy) Breed

 

Despite his diminutive size, the Toy Poodle stands proudly among dogdom¿s true aristocrats. Beneath the curly, low-allergen coat is an elegant athlete and companion for all reasons and seasons. Poodles come in three size varieties: Standards should be more than 15 inches tall at the shoulder; Miniatures are 15 inches or under; Toys stand no more than 10 inches. All three varieties have the same build and proportions. At dog shows, Poodles are usually seen in the elaborate Continental clip. Most pet owners prefer the simpler Sporting clip, in which the coat is shorn to follow the outline of the squarely built, smoothly muscled body. Forget any preconceived notions about Poodles you may have: Poodles are eager, athletic, and wickedly smart dogs of remarkable versatility. The Standard, with his greater size and strength, is the best all-around athlete of the family, but all Poodles can be trained with great success.

Grooming Tips

Unless you plan to keep your Poodle clipped in a short trim, you will need to learn how to brush how to brush him daily to keep his coat from matting. If you do not brush and comb a full-coated Poodle completely to the skin, the hair will mat near the roots and will have to be shaved off to start all over with new growth. Most pet owners opt to keep the Poodle in a shorter trim. Some owners learn to do this clipping and trimming themselves, while others choose to take their dog to a professional dog groomer every four to six weeks for a bath, grooming, and nail trim. The breed's relatively nonshedding coat makes the breed a good choice for people with allergies.

Poogle (Beagle + Poodle) Breed

 

What is a Poogle? Also referred to as the Beaglepoo or Beapoo, the Poogle is a hybrid dog, an offspring resulting from crossing a purebred Beagle with a purebred Poodle. Beagle Poodle mix is a small to medium-sized dog featuring the Beagle's playful temperament and the Poodle's wavy coat. One of the reasons for crossing a Poodle with a Beagle is because while Beagles produce an abundant shedding, Poodles are known to be low-shedding as well as hypoallergenic dogs. When crossing these two breeds, Poogle often inherits Poodle's nonshedding coat. Beagle owners may appreciate the fact that Poogles produce much less shedded hair. Poogles are well known for their loving temperaments and affectionate personalities, which make them excellent companions for most families and single adults. If you are, therefore, looking for a small, playful, loving and smart dog breed, the Poogle is good to go.
With a warm and friendly personality, the Poogle is an intelligent animal that makes a great pet. It is ideal for all age groups in families of seniors and singles. Poogle's intelligence is attributed to the brightness of its purebred parents. As such, Poogles will tend to respond very well to training. These beautiful pooches are also exceptionally observant, and can easily learn new tricks.
Although Poogles possess keen hunting instincts, they are very wonderful companions and they love being with humans a lot. Poogle dogs will bond with all age groups in their family, and showing off their tricks to those they love is something they enjoy doing. Most Poogles get along fine with other dogs in their family mainly because Beagles are very friendly and easily make friends with other canines, which is a trait that is inherited by many Poogle dogs.
Although Poogles are not large dogs, they are full of energy and owners need to keep their Poogles mentally and physically engaged throughout the day. People who like long walks with a pet several times a day and have plenty of time each day to dedicate to an intelligent and active pet make suitable owners for Poogle dogs.

Grooming Tips

The Poogles' coat appearance depends on which parent was favored more. It will normally exhibit something from the curly coat of the Poodle and Short coat of the Beagle. That said, a vast majority of Poogles will have wavy hair of medium length on the forehead, cheeks, and muzzle.
Poogles that have long hair usually require more grooming than the Short-haired Poogles who require to be brushed and combed once or twice a week. For those with curly coats or long hair, you will need to have a Puppy clip or Poodle clip for clipping occasionally to avoid the hair from tangling.
Generally, the Poogle doesn't shed a lot and will, therefore, be a lot easier to clean. Some Poogles tend to be hypoallergenic but ensure to pay a visit prior to acquiring the Poogle pup to test this. Bathing a Poogle dog should be done when necessary using a vet-approved shampoo, as bathing frequently could potentially damage the natural oils on the dog's skin that helps to keep it moist.
Poogles' ears are usually covered with fluffy hair and may catch debris, dirt, and moisture. As such, you need to check the Poogle's ears once a week and wipe them using a cotton ball and water or an ear cleaning solution for dogs to prevent any infections. The dog's teeth should be brushed at least twice a week using canine toothpaste to prevent dental issues as well as maintain fresh breath. The nails should also be clipped when they get long, and you shouldn't cut them so deep as they could easily bleed and cause a painful experience for the Poogle.

Porcelaine Breed

 

The Porcelaine is elegant, energetic, and a fierce hunter; he is used for small game, driving it to waiting guns. He is very fond of his owners, family, friends and children and he loves to take part in all family activities. He excels as a house pet and is easily crate trained and housebroken. Elegant, proud, graceful, cat-like and stunningly gorgeous, the Porcelaine is never shy or timid and always eager for a pat on the head or a hug. His nature makes him an excellent candidate for medical therapy, medical alert, medical service, police public relations, and search and rescue. The Porcelaine is primarily a hunting dog breed, originating from a mixture of highly intelligent French and English scent hounds. That said, you must remember that any breed with a high prey drive will require careful consideration in housing and handling. Another charming aspect of the breed is that they tend to be quiet indoors or in their kennel, but do have a beautiful melodious baying call. They are not nuisance barkers.

Grooming Tips

Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep your Porcelaine clean and looking his best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your dog. The strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting, and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

Portuguese Podengo Breed

 

Portuguese Podengos are lively, agile, playful, alert, highly intelligent but not always easy to train, independent yet loving with the family and sometimes suspicious of strangers. The breed's two sizes have different jobs: the larger hunts deer and boar and the medium-sized hunts rabbit. In the U.S, they are successful in coursing, agility, nose work, barn hunt, rally and in the conformation ring. The Podengo is a rugged coursing hound that comes in two sizes: (medium, standing 16 to 22 inches at the shoulder) and (large, 22 to 28 inches). They also have two coat types: smooth and wirehaired. The breed's enthusiasts describe it as 'primitive,' that is, it's a rustic, no-frills hound untouched by fads and fashion since arriving on the Iberian Peninsula ages ago. Among their distinctive characteristics are large, erect, triangular ears; a pyramid-shaped head that tapers to the nose; and sweetly expressive, almond-shaped eyes. Podengos, in general, are funny dogs that love to play. They easily entertain themselves with toys, chase each other and stalk each other around the house and yard. They are highly intelligent and learn new things very fast. Since they are a watchful dog though, they are not as easy going and playful with strangers and may view smaller animals like dogs and cats as prey. They may be quite reserved initially and prefer to greet strangers on their own terms. They are very tolerant and compliant, eager to please their family members and put up with most requests we make of them.

Grooming Tips

The wirehaired Podengos will shed in sections. It is important to brush regularly to remove dead hair. The smooth-coated dogs should require slightly less grooming; an occasional brushing will suffice. Neither coat should be stripped. Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep them clean and looking their best. Their nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting, and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

Portuguese Podengo Pequeno Breed

 

Classified as a hound, the alert and playful little Portuguese Podengo Pequeno is a quick, athletic rabbit hunter of ancient lineage. Pequenos love to run, romp, and chase when outdoors but make charming and well-mannered housemates. The Pequeno is the smallest of Portugal's three Podengo breeds, standing 8 to 12 inches at the shoulder and weighing no more than 13 pounds. A distinctive feature is the wedge-shaped head, with expressive almond-shaped eyes and erect, pointed ears. The long-backed body is muscular, the tail tapered and sickle-shaped, and the coat either short and dense or long and wiry. The overall look is that of a rustic, no-nonsense rabbit dog unspoiled by passing fashions.

Grooming Tips

The Portuguese Podengo Pequeno is a no-frills, wash-and-wear kind of dog who comes in two coat types: smooth and wire. Routine brushing followed by running a comb through the hair to eliminate any tangles in the wire coat, and an occasional wipe-down with a damp cloth on the smooth coat, will be sufficient to keep him in great shape between monthly baths. No clipping or scissoring is required. Starting a good dental-care program with regular brushing will alleviate the possibility of issues occurring later. Nails should be trimmed regularly using a nail clipper or grinder.

Portuguese Pointer Breed

 

The Portuguese Pointer is a very old hunting breed bred to work closely with its handler. They are enthusiastic in their work and very dedicated to their owner. The Portuguese Pointer is considered a medium-sized dog. As a sporting dog, they have quite a bit of energy, especially when young. Their affectionate nature is so intense that the Portuguese standard describes it as sometimes ""inappropriate and inconvenient."" This breed is very hardy and is capable of great endurance and devotion. Calm and very sociable, they can be somewhat haughty towards other dogs. Curious by nature, they work with persistence and vivacity and are always a keen hunter that stays in close contact with his handler.

Grooming Tips

Portuguese Pointers require minimal grooming due to their short, tight coats, but they all seem to enjoy a nice brushing with a rubber curry-type brush anyway, which also helps remove dead hair. In general, their hard coat is good at repelling dirt, so frequent baths are not needed. Routine attention to nails, teeth, and ears is expected.

Portuguese Sheepdog Breed

 

The Portuguese Sheepdog is exceptionally intelligent and lively. Very devoted to the shepherd and his herd, he can be somewhat wary of strangers and vigilant at night. Today, he is also an excellent companion, sporting and guard dog. He is known for his skillful ability to keep livestock in pastures and also for searching out stray animals. He is always vigilant and successfully alerts if predators are in the area. This breed is extremely devoted to its work and conducts it with joy and pleasure. Portuguese Sheepdogs are medium-sized dogs with appreciable rusticity and sobriety and are extremely agile and swift. Their long hair has a goat-like texture, without an undercoat, and can be straight or slightly wavy. The dense and evenly-distributed coat forms a long beard, mustache, and eyebrows that are not so long as to cover his eyes. Coat colors can be yellow, brown, grey, fawn, wolf grey in shades ranging from light to dark, and black, accompanied by tan markings. This lively breed has a simian-like attitude and appearance, which is why it is known in its native region of Portugal as a 'monkey dog'.

Grooming Tips:

Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep your Portuguese Sheepdog clean and looking his best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your dog. The strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting, and cracking. The ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in an infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.Source

Portuguese water Dog Breed

 

The bright and biddable Portuguese Water Dog was bred to be an all-around fisherman's helper. The robust, medium-sized body is covered by a coat of tight, low-shedding curls. PWDs are eager and athletic companions built for water work. The Portuguese Water Dog is super-smart and very 'biddable', meaning he's easy to train and eager to please. The Portie can be groomed in two styles: The retriever clip (the entire coat is clipped to one inch in length, with the tail tip at full length) or the more check-me-out lion clip, where the coat is on the hindquarters and muzzle is clipped down to the skin.

Grooming Tips

The Portuguese Water Dog's dense, profuse coat is hypoallergenic but requires regular and extensive grooming. The coat ranges in appearance from tight and curly to loose and wavy. It may be kept in the lion clip (where the coat on the hindquarters and muzzle is clipped to the skin) or the retriever clip (where the entire coat is clipped to one inch in length and follows the outline of the dog). Beyond regular weekly grooming, an occasional bath will keep the Portie clean and looking his best.

Pudelpointer Breed

 

The Pudelpointer is a calm, self-controlled, versatile gun dog with a distinct hunting instinct and lacks game or gun shyness. In his native country of Germany, he has always ranked high in performance tests and in the field. This breed is enjoyed and valued for its desire and drive. The Pudelpointer originated in Germany, created by crossing the Poodle with the Pointer. A versatile, genetically sound and healthy gun dog emerged from this cross and the breed is useful for all kinds of work in the fields, woods and water. His coat can be wire-haired, smooth/short, or rough and his coat color ranges from light brown to black. He may also have small white markings.

Grooming Tips

The Pudelpointer has a close, flat-lying, hard, rough coat of medium length with a dense undercoat; as a result, he sheds seasonally. Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep him clean and looking his best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your dog. The strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting, and cracking. The ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

Pug Breed

 

Once the mischievous companion of Chinese emperors, and later the mascot of Holland's royal House of Orange, the small but solid Pug is today adored by his millions of fans around the world. Pugs live to love and to be loved in return. The Pug's motto is the Latin phrase 'multum in parvo' (a lot in a little)'¿an apt description of this small but muscular breed. They come in three colors: silver or apricot-fawn with a black face mask, or all black. The large round head, the big, sparkling eyes, and the wrinkled brow give Pugs a range of human-like expressions'¿surprise, happiness, curiosity'¿that have delighted owners for centuries. Pug owners say their breed is the ideal house dog. Pugs are happy in the city or country, with kids or old folks, as an only pet or in a pack. They enjoy their food, and care must be taken to keep them trim. They do best in moderate climates'¿not too hot, not too cold'¿but, with proper care, Pugs can be their adorable selves anywhere.

Grooming Tips

The Pug's short, smooth, glossy coat needs minimal maintenance, but it does shed. Weekly brushing with a medium-bristle brush, a rubber grooming mitt, or a hound glove will help to remove the loose hair and help keep him looking his best. Pugs don't need to be bathed unless they happen to get into something particularly messy or start to get a doggy odor. The Pug's nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can cause him discomfort.

Puli Breed

 

No other breed can be mistaken for the Puli, a compact but powerful herder covered from head to tail with profuse, naturally occurring cords. Bred to work closely with humans, these agile and faithful little dynamos are quick learners. First, there are those dreadlocks, the instantly recognizable feature of the Puli (pronounced "Poo-lee", "Pulik" is the plural). The coat's naturally occurring cords are wooly, dense, and weatherproof. Either corded or brushed out, Puli coats require lots of attention. Under the dreads there's a compact but powerful dog, standing 16 to 17 inches at the shoulder. Pulik are remarkably agile and light on their feet, earning a reputation as the 'acrobat of the dog world.

Grooming Tips

The Puli can be kept corded, brushed, or with a clipped coat. Until a Puli puppy is 8 to 10 months old, there is no grooming to do except for regular bathing and ears, and grinding toe nails. When the Puli's undercoat begins to come in, the coat will begin to feel thick and matted to your fingers. You will begin to feel natural separations in the coat, where the hair seems to clump together close to the skin. This is the beginning of a cord. At this time, you can separate these soft clumps from each other by pulling them apart with your fingers. Cords are simply 'organized mats' that have tightened up with time. This is a process that will be repeated many times over the course of about six to nine months. Once the coat has distinct cords, all you do is bathe the dog when needed and separate the cords'¿a good time to do this is while you are watching TV and need something to do with your hands. The breed's national parent club, the Puli Club of America, provides a number of articles on grooming on the club's website.

Pumi Breed

 

A compact, nimble-footed herder of Hungarian origin, the Pumi is easily recognized by a corkscrew-curled coat, two-thirds erect ears, and distinctive whimsical expression. The breed is famed for its intelligence, agility, and boldness. The Pumi (POO-mee; plural Pumik) was conceived as a compact, quick, and fearless sheepherder capable of moving flocks on the narrow roads connecting the pastures of western Hungary. At a glance, it might be hard to believe that this cuddly charmer was born to do such tough work. With his coat of corkscrew curls, circular tail, expressive ears, and distinctively whimsical look, the Pumi is all kinds of cute. But beneath the curls is a lean, deep-chested herder with a seemingly endless capacity for work and play.

Grooming Tips

The Pumi's coat consists of 50 percent soft hair and 50 percent harsher hair, all the same length. He needs combing every three to six weeks, followed by a good wetting-down to let the coat curl back up. Once curled, the coat can be trimmed to keep it looking tidy. The Pumi doesn't shed, but hair will come out during grooming. Using a blow-dryer on the Pumi's coat is not recommended, as this will remove the characteristic curls.

Pyredoodle (Great Pyrenees + Poodle) Breed

 

Pyredoodles are an intentional cross between a standard Poodle and a Great Pyrenees. Poodles are highly intelligent, non-shedding, and generally healthy.Great Pyrenees (also known as the Pyrenean Mountain Dog) are huge, majestic dogs. Known for their unconditional love for family, guardian instincts against intruders, and elegant thick white coats, Pyrenees are well-known as livestock protectors as well as wonderful family dogs. Great Pyrenees typically rank as being excellent family dogs; very friendly with their family and great with kids.
Pyredoodle Personality
Our desire in breeding top quality Pyredoodles is to produce dogs that have many of the Great Pyrenees wonderful traits without necessarily having the drawbacks. With any mixed breed it's impossible to perfectly predict the outcome of the hybrid, but so far Pyredoodles have been met with enthusiastic response. Pyredoodle owners love their devoted, affectionate nature, low-to-non shedding coats, more quiet temperaments, and outstanding intuition.
Pyredoodles are perhaps the best of all doodles for being like a "nanny"--entirely devoted to children and small animals. Pyredoodles love to protect small things. They are one of the only doodle breeds that can function as a watch dog. Most doodles are just as likely to lick as intruder as to bark. Pyredoodles tend to be fine with "strangers" who are welcomed by the family, but anyone that is uninvited will be very suspect to a typical Pyredoodle.
Since Poodles love to stay close to home, a Pyredoodle is much less likely to wander than a purebred Great Pyrenees. However, we still recommend that all Pyredoodle owners to have a fence. Great Pyrenees can be wanderers. Pyrenees are believed to have descended from huge dogs that wandered the mountains of Asia thousands of years ago.

Grooming Tips

The coat of your Pyredoodle will largely determine the amount of maintenance your dog requires. The Pyredoodle with the shorter coat will need less maintenance that his double-coated counterpart. The single-coated Pyredoodle will need weekly brushing; he is not likely to shed often. The double-coated Pyredoodle will need daily brushing to prevent matting. Wash your Pyredoodle only when necessary. The natural oils of his coat will keep his fur looking shiny and healthy. Brush his teeth two or three times a week in order to prevent the build-up of tartar and bad breath. To prevent tooth decay, brush his teeth every day. Trim his nails every two or three weeks. A good rule of thumb is to cut his nails if you can hear them clicking on the tile floor.

Pyrenean Mastiff Breed

 

A centuries-old, rare breed from the Pyrenees Mountains in Spain, this livestock guardian protected flocks from wolves, bears and thieves. Today, while it is still an effective guardian, many families have found the joy of owning the gentle and loving, yet independent, Pyrenean Mastiff. The Pyrenean Mastiff is friendly towards humans, calm, noble and very intelligent. At the same time, he is courageous and proud towards strangers, from whom he never backs away. In his behavior towards other dogs, he is good-natured and aware of his superior strength. Though he will do his job to alert when strangers or animals come around, he is not known for being an incessant barker. As a guardian breed, the Pyrenean Mastiff has a very low prey drive and, therefore, loves and protects all creatures, human and animal alike. They love children and welcome friends and family, and only feel the need to protect when its a real threat. All that love can get a bit messy though; just like any mastiff, they do drool and quite profusely when exposed to heat, food, or water.

Grooming Tips

Bathe your Pyrenean Mastiff as required, though less is better in order to retain the natural oils in his coat. Brushing at least every three days will keep the coat mat-free and fresh. Trim nails to include dewclaws, and trim mats that may appear between the toes. The Pyrenean Mastiff is a double-coated breed, so it does shed twice a year. Beyond those times, it does not typically shed much hair. Use a rake to aid in removing loose hairs when shedding.

Pyrenean Shepherd Breed

 

Enthusiastic, mischievous, and whip-smart, the Pyrenean Shepherd is an indefatigable herder descended from ancient sheepdogs of the Pyrenees mountains. Tough and sinewy Pyr Sheps come in 'rough-faced' and 'smooth-faced' coat varieties. These tough, lean, and lively herders, famous for their vigorous and free-flowing movement, come in two coat varieties: rough-faced and smooth-faced. Roughs have profuse, 'windswept' hair above the muzzle and a generally harsh coat; smooths have short facial hair, a finer-textured coat, and a slightly longer, pointier muzzle. Both varieties of this sinewy, rectangular breed come in many colors and patterns. Pyr Sheps see the world through dark almond-shaped eyes conveying an alert and cunning expression.

Grooming Tips

The Pyr Shep needs weekly brushing to keep his coat free from mats and tangles and looking its best. His scruffy appearance comes from his double coat'¿a soft undercoat and a protective outer coat'¿which features a combination of straight and short to moderately long hair. The harsh outer coat may shed quite a bit, while the soft undercoat can mat very easily. The coat can be kept combed out and left as it grows, or can be corded as desired. Cleaning ears and trimming nails are an important part of his grooming routine.

Rafeiro do Alentejo Breed

 

The Rafeiro do Alentejo is an excellent farm and estate watch dog. He is also a very useful livestock protector, being more vigilant at night and very serious when guarding territory or any other property entrusted to him. He has a calm and confident expression. Since the beginning of the breed's history, Rafeiros Alentejanos were used in packs as hunting dogs for big game, though this function has gradually disappeared over time. More recently, the breed is a guard dog for property and livestock, watching sheep and cattle. They also often work alone in prairies and will defend the herd against any intruders. Hailing from Portugal, the Rafeiro do Alentejo is a large-sized dog, powerful, rustic, sober, and calm. He moves with a heavy, slow roll. His coat is short or medium-length and thick, straight and dense. They can be black, wolf grey, or fawn, with or without brindling, always with white markings; or white with patches of these colors.

Grooming Tips

Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep your Rafeiro do Alentejo clean and looking his best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your dog. The strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting, and cracking. The ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

Rat Terrier Breed

 

An American original, with a breed name said to be coined by Teddy Roosevelt, the Rat Terrier is a compact, tough, smooth-coated exterminator dog. RTs come in two size varieties and are happy-go-lucky, playful, and portable companions. Balanced, compactly built Rat Terriers are tough but elegant-looking. There are two size divisions: Miniatures stand 10 to 13 inches at the shoulder; standards are over 13 inches and as high as 18 inches. The smooth, shiny coat comes in varieties of pied patterns. (Pied, a word borrowed from the horseman's lexicon, means 'comparatively large patches of one or more colors in combination with white.') These smoothly muscled exterminators are constructed for the efficient movement required for a long day's work.

Grooming Tips

The Rat Terrier's short, dense coat requires very little care to remain in good condition. A weekly once-over with a soft brush or hound glove will keep his coat healthy and glossy. A bath every month or so will likely be enough, depending on the dog's lifestyle. Rat Terriers shed seasonally, during which time a shedding tool or rubber curry brush will help remove loose hair. The nails should be trimmed at least monthly, keeping them short and neat, as overly long nails can be painful to the dog. Check his ears weekly, and remove any excess wax and debris, which can cause ear infections. Teeth should be brushed daily if possible, using a toothpaste formulated for dogs.

Redbone Coonhound Breed

 

The streamlined Redbone Coonhound, an American original, is even-tempered, mellow, and kindly at home but a tiger on the trail. Vigorous activities like hunting and swimming between long periods of rest is the rhythm of coonhound life. Redbones are medium-to-large hound dogs whose muscles undulate beneath a sleek and stunning red coat. The overall impression is that a master sculptor carved them from blocks of the finest mahogany. The classically houndy head is flanked by ears long enough to reach the nose. Dreamy brown eyes give the face an expression described by the breed's devotees as 'pleading.' Bred to work on all kinds of punishing terrain, Redbones are fast and surefooted and move with a proud, determined gait.

Grooming Tips

The Redbone Conhound's short, smooth, protective coat requires a minimum of care. Using a shedding tool or grooming mitt at least weekly will help keep shedding to a minimum. This action also distributes skin oils down the hair shaft, giving his coat a natural shine. Nails should be trimmed once a month, and a bath every four to six weeks will keep the coat and skin clean and healthy. The Redbone's ears should be checked weekly and cleaned of any excess wax and debris as needed.

Rhodesian Ridgeback Breed

 

The Rhodesian Ridgeback is an all-purpose 'Renaissance hound' whose hallmark is the ridge, or stripe of backward-growing hair, on his back. Though the breed was made famous in its native Africa for its skill at tracking and baying, but never, ever killing, lions, today Ridgebacks are cherished family dogs whose owners must be prepared to deal with their independence and strong prey drive. Beneath the Ridgeback's trademark ridge is a whole lot of hound: Ridgebacks are fast and powerful athletes who can weigh between 70 and 85 pounds, and oftentimes more. They come in only one color, wheaten, which spans every shade seen in a wheat field, from pale flaxen to the burnished red of a maturing crop. Ridgebacks also have two nose colors: black and the less commonly seen brown. The formidable Ridgeback can be strong-willed, independent, and sometimes domineering. Ridgebacks must be guided with a firm but a fair hand from puppyhood. They are faithful friends, protective of their loved ones, and meltingly affectionate with those whom they trust. Still, a Ridgeback can be too much hound for the novice dog owner.

Grooming Tips

The Rhodesian Ridgeback does shed somewhat, but overall his grooming needs are minimal. A regular weekly brushing will help to remove loose hair and keep the coat glossy, and an occasional bath will help to keep the Ridgeback clean and looking his best. The nails should be trimmed often if not worn down naturally, as overly long nails can cause the dog discomfort and problems walking and running. Many Ridgebacks resist nail clipping, and many respond more positively to a nail grinder.

Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog Breed

 

The Romanian Mioritic Shepherd Dog origins come from near the Carpathian Mountains. The breed is very impressive in size and character. Used for centuries to guard livestock in its homeland of Romania, the Mioritic Sheepdog is a typical Livestock Guarding Dog (LGD). Loyal, reliable, independent, and fiercely protective, he is friendly and devoted to his family but very mistrusting of strangers. It is a large dog with long coat which requires regular grooming, and with any dog of this size and temperament requires daily exercise and basic obedience training. Mioritics are lively and stubborn but in spite of all their independence they are very sensitive creatures in their furry armor. As puppies they stick to the pack which has accepted them. This can be any kind of creature ' dog, cat, horse, sheep, the Mioritic needs very close family ties; a house without doors it thinks would be ideal. This certainly depends a great deal on the weather. Its favorite place is always very close to its favorite person. It determines its resting place itself. This may even be the couch or a carpet not suitable for dogs, but as a rule shepherds, even as puppies, prefer to sleep on hard ground. They need no dog baskets, no special mattresses and by no means an allocated place. No 'work creating' program is necessary but daily walks and hikes provide exciting variation.

Grooming Tips

Despite the breed´s scraggly fur, our dogs are very low-maintenance. They do not require a bath, nor daily brushing. In the event that they become wet or totally filthy, the dogs are simply confined for a time, until the dirt, mud, or what-not may be easily brushed out. A dry Mioritic is a clean Mioritic. Besides the daily monitoring of eyes, ears, and teeth, the dogs also undergo a thorough grooming once a week. The pups are accustomed to the grooming procedures early on as part daily training, since grooming serves establish hierarchy: The dog allowing the grooming, accepts the dominance of the one doing grooming.

Rottweiler Breed

 

The Rottweiler is a robust working breed of great strength descended from the mastiffs of the Roman legions. A gentle playmate and protector within the family circle, the Rottie observes the outside world with a self-assured aloofness. A male Rottweiler will stand anywhere from 24 to 27 muscular inches at the shoulder; females run a bit smaller and lighter. The glistening, short black coat with smart rust markings add to the picture of imposing strength. A thickly muscled hindquarters powers the Rottie's effortless trotting gait. A well-bred and properly raised Rottie will be calm and confident, courageous but not unduly aggressive. The aloof demeanor these world-class guardians present to outsiders belies the playfulness, and downright silliness, that endear Rotties to their loved ones. (No one told the Rottie he's not a toy breed, so he is liable plop onto your lap for a cuddle.) Early training and socialization will harness a Rottie's territorial instincts in a positive way.

Grooming Tips

The Rottweiler has a straight, coarse, medium-length outer coat that lies flat. The undercoat is present on the neck and thighs. He should be brushed weekly and bathed regularly. He sheds only very moderately for most of the year, although he will shed more profusely twice a year, usually in the spring and fall. His teeth should be brushed and nails trimmed weekly. The use of a grinding tool such as a Dremel is especially effective in trimming the nails.

Russell Terrier Breed

 

Upbeat, lively, inquisitive, and friendly, the jaunty Russell Terrier was developed by England's "Sporting Parson" for use in foxhunts. The adorable Russell Terrier looks like a plush toy come to life but is an eager, tireless working terrier. These jaunty little fellows pack lots of personality into a compact, rectangular body standing 10 to 12 inches at the shoulder. Their dark, almond-shaped eyes and mobile V-shaped ears bring out the keenly intelligent expression'¿an endearing hallmark of the breed. All three coat types are mostly white with markings that are tan or black, or both. Russells move with a free, effortless gait that announces the breed's innate confidence.

Grooming Tips

The Russell Terrier's rough and ready appearance is easily maintained. Coats come in three types: smooth, broken, and rough. The dense, short, smooth coat can be kept looking great with an all-over rubdown with a soft brush or a hound glove once a week. The rough and broken coats will require going over with a brush or a dog comb weekly but are kept mostly natural, with minimal grooming. The Russell's nails should be trimmed monthly, and his ears checked weekly for debris or excess wax and cleaned as needed.

Russian Toy Breed

 

The Russian Toy is a small, elegant, lively dog with long legs, fine bones and lean muscles. They are active and cheerful, possessing keen intelligence and a desire to please. This breed loves to snuggle and be close to their human companions, although sometimes slightly aloof to strangers. They are neither cowardly nor aggressive. The Russian Toy is a toy breed with a lineage that dates back to the Russian aristocracy. In general, he is a good-natured imp that loves to run and play. They will dash through the house or yard chasing toys as long as you can keep up, while many others are willing to do nothing more than lounge in your lap all day long, content in knowing that they are the prize jewel in your home. They thrive on human companionship and will let you know if they are feeling neglected. Their coat is either semi-long or smooth. The longhaired variety carries a nice ruff on the chest and unique feathering on the extremities, tail and ears. Long-coated Russian Toys will not have an adult coat until it is more than a year old and full fringing not until three years of age. The smooth-coated variety is sleek and smooth to the touch. There is also a slight attitude difference between the two varieties. Smooth Coats tend to be a little more terrier-like than Long Coats. However, both share a larger-than-life personality.

Grooming Tips

The longhaired variety requires more grooming than the smooth-coated variety for obvious reasons. The long coat has body hair from 1-3 inches long. Their ears are covered with thick, long hair forming a fringe, and there are distinct feathers on the rear side of his limbs. The longhaired variety should be brushed two to three times per week and fringes should be kept free of debris. Monthly baths with high-quality shampoo and conditioner are usually enough to keep the coat healthy. The smooth-coated Russian Toy has short, close-lying, shiny hair without an undercoat or fringes. Regular weekly brushing with a soft brush along with occasional baths is recommended to keep the smooth coat free of dead hair and flaky skin. A daily shammy wipe-down adds luster to the coat, too.

Russian Tsvetnaya Bolonka Breed

 

Russkaya Tsvetnaya Bolonka translates to "Russian Colored Lapdog." Bolonki were originally bred to be the ultimate house pet for apartment living. Sweet, loving, intelligent, and willing to please, he is friendly to all and shows no sign of aggression. The Russian Tsvetnaya Bolonka, or Bolonka for short, is a member of the Bichon family that was almost extinct until after the Cold War. It is a small companion dog that is hypoallergenic, funny, clever beyond words and intensely loyal to its family. Some are excellent mimics; others are content to sit by the door and monitor who is allowed in or out. Spirited, yet easy-going and sociable, the Russian Tsvetnaya Bolonka is great with children. Although they are quick to alert, they will not be a constant barker with early training on appropriate behavior. They are fairly independent for a toy breed and require early socialization with people. However, Bolonki do get along well with dogs and other animals. Very clever and smart, they do well in formal training such as obedience, rally, tracking and agility when trained with a firm, but gentle, hand.

Grooming Tips

The Russian Tsvetnaya Bolonka requires regular brushing and routine care for eyes, ears, teeth, and nails. Brush or comb the coat with a wide-tooth comb on a regular basis several times per week to prevent mats from forming. Dogs kept in full coat may need their face, mustache, and beard washed daily. For show purposes, no other trimming other than the feet is permitted, and the coat on the back should fall naturally and should not be deliberately parted. The eyes and ears should be checked frequently for foreign matter, injury, and irritation. Keeping the eyes clean will help avoid infections. Hair in the eyes can cause irritation, leading up to painful corneal scratches and ulcers. Drop ears are prone to infection, particularly after bathing or swimming, so be sure to keep ears clean and dry.

Saint Berdoodle (Saint Bernard + Poodle) Breed

 

The Saint Berdoodle is a mixed breed dog — a cross between the Saint Bernard and Poodle dog breeds. Friendly, intelligent, and loyal, Saint Berdoodles are great family dogs. The Saint Berdoodle is also known as the Saint Berpoo, St. Berpoo, and St. Berdoodle. Two common color combinations of Saint Berdoodles are white-and-brown and white-and-black. They can also be red with white accents or white with red accents.The coats of Saint Berdoodles can take after either parent--wiry and curly for the Poodle, or longer and smooth or rough for the Saint Bernard.Saint Berdoodles are generally pretty well-equipped for cold weather, especially if their coats are similar to Saint Bernards. They aren't quite as tolerant of high heat.Saint Berdoodles are great with people of all ages, including kids. The only concern with these dogs is their size with very young children. Be sure to supervise interactions with very young children in case of accidental stepping or sitting.The Poodle's sense of adventure and higher energy, mixed with the Saint Bernard's inquisitiveness and laid-back attitude, means you should be prepared to offer your dog outdoor exercise time every day, along with opportunities for nap time afterward.

Grooming Tips

Saint Berdoodles have a variety of color combinations, mostly based on their parents. Two common color combinations are white-and-brown and white-and-black. They can also be red with white accents or white with red accents.
The coats of Saint Berdoodles can take after either parent--wiry and curly for the Poodle, or longer and smooth or rough for the Saint Bernard.
Saint Berdoodles are generally a lower-maintenance mixed breed. If they have the curly coat of the Poodle, they won't need frequent brushing, but they will require regular trims at the groomer. If they have the shaggier coat of the Saint Bernard, weekly brushing will keep shedding down, or more often during "shedding season," as their coats change for the weather, though Saint Berdoodles are not high on the shedding scale. Bathing should be about once a month, or as needed.
Saint Berdoodles are generally pretty well-equipped for cold weather, especially if their coats are similar to Saint Bernards. They aren't quite as tolerant of high heat, so make sure not to have them out too long when temperatures climb, especially over 90 degrees Fahrenheit.

Saint Bernard Breed

 

The Saint Bernard does not rank very high in AKC registrations, but the genial giant of the Swiss Alps is nonetheless among the world's most famous and beloved breeds. Saints are famously watchful and patient 'nanny dogs' for children. Not ranked particularly high in AKC registrations, this genial giant is nonetheless among the world's most famous and beloved breeds. The Saint's written standard abounds with phrases like 'very powerful,' 'extraordinarily muscular,' 'imposing,' and 'massive.' A male stands a minimum 27.5 inches at the shoulder; females will be smaller and more delicately built. The huge head features a wrinkled brow, a short muzzle, and dark eyes, combining to give Saints the intelligent, friendly expression that was such a welcome sight to stranded Alpine travelers.

Grooming Tips

Saint Bernards come in long-haired and short-haired varieties, but both types of coats require the same care. Weekly brushing will help to remove dirt and loose hair and keep the dog looking his best. Any tangles can be worked out with a slicker brush or metal comb. During shedding season, which occurs twice a year, brushing will become a daily activity. The occasional bath will keep the Saint looking and smelling fresh. As with all breeds, the nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can be painful to the dog and cause problems walking and running.

Saluki Breed

 

Among the world's oldest breeds, the slim but rugged Saluki was the hunting hound of kings for thousands of years. Salukis are swift and agile sprinters who love a good chase. They make gentle, dignified, and independent but loyal pets. The beauty of Salukis has been a thing of wonder for thousands of years. They're slim and leggy, but very strong and perfectly balanced, like a great athlete or dancer. Males can stand between 23 and 28 inches at the shoulder; females can be much shorter. They come in a many colors and patterns. Their large, oval-shaped eyes are warm and intelligent. Salukis are highly adaptable, able to live and work in any climate. They're magnificent animals, but owning them comes with many special challenges.

Grooming Tips

Salukis have two types of coats'¿feathered and smooth'¿and both are easily groomed with weekly brushing, although if they have long ear or tail feathering, that may take a bit more attention. Many Saluki owners use a snood to keep ear feathering out of the food bowl (smooth Salukis do not have that problem). Salukis are very clean dogs and known for not having a 'doggy' odor. Bathing need only be done if they get dirty or before a dog show.

Samoyed Breed

 

The Samoyed is a substantial but graceful dog standing anywhere from 19 to a bit over 23 inches at the shoulder. Powerful, tireless, with a thick all-white coat impervious to cold, Sammies are perfectly beautiful but highly functional. Even their most delightful feature, a perpetual smile, has a practical function: The upturned corners of the mouth keep Sammies from drooling, preventing icicles from forming on the face. A Sammy sentenced to solitary confinement in the yard is a miserable and destructive creature. These are smart, social, mischievous dogs who demand love and attention. Sammies need a very firm but loving hand in training. As pack animals, they must learn early who the alpha dog is and the alpha dog must be you. Samoyeds, the smiling sled dogs, were bred for hard work in the world's coldest locales. In the Siberian town of Oymyakon, for instance, temperatures of minus-60 degrees are common. The Sammy's famous white coat is thick enough to protect against such brutal conditions. Powerful, agile, tireless, impervious to cold, Sammies are drop-dead gorgeous but highly functional. Even their most delightful feature, a perpetual smile, has a practical function: The mouth's upturned corners keep Sammies from drooling, preventing icicles from forming on the face.

Grooming Tips

The Samoyed has a profuse double coat, with a longer outer coat of harsh hair and a soft, thick, wooly undercoat. Samoyeds shed quite a bit all the time, even more so during shedding season, which can occur once or twice a year. Daily brushing will help to remove dirt and loose hairs and keep the dog looking his best. Mats or tangles can be worked out with a slicker brush or metal comb. The nails should be trimmed every three to four weeks or as needed.

Schapendoes Breed

 

This shaggy sheepdog of Holland is also known as the Dutch Sheep Dog. Schapendoes are cheerful, funny, clever and brave and are very good family pets. They also have a strong desire to please. The Schapendoes were everywhere in the Netherlands during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, but their numbers dwindled drastically when Border Collies were imported. When the breed club for Nederlandse Schapendoes was founded in 1947, the Schapendoes breed was resuscitated. The Schapendoes is a lightly-built, long-coated, medium-sized dog. His movements are effortless and springy and his astounding ability to jump makes him excel at agility and other dog sports. With an attentive and courageous character, he is intelligent, watchful, lively, friendly and high-spirited. Towards people familiar to him, he develops great affection and loyalty.

Grooming Tips

Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep the Schapendoes clean and looking his best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your dog. The strong fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting, and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

Schipperke Breed

 

The Schipperke, Belgium's "little captain," is the traditional barge dog of the Low Countries. Curious, lively, and intense but mischievous, this little black dog is a robust, long-lived companion for whom there is never a dull moment. Standing no higher than 13 inches, Schipperkes are small dogs built for hard work. Schips were created as ratters and watchdogs. Their powerful jaws, necks, and forequarters'¿coupled with a stealthy, catlike hunting style'¿make them ideal rat-catching machines. The black coat is profuse around the neck, shoulders, and legs, giving the breed a silhouette that accentuates a thick, substantial body. The foxy face completes the unique look of a unique breed. If you can't tell a Schipperke from an ordinary dog, you simply haven't been paying attention.

Grooming Tips

The Schipperke's coat needs only weekly brushing, though they do go through a shedding season once or twice a year. During these periods, more frequent brushing will help to keep the amount of shed hair under control. As with all breeds, the nails should be trimmed regularly, as overly long nails can cause the dog discomfort.

Schnoodle (Schnauzer + Poodle) Breed

 

Schnoodle is a cross between the Schnauzer and the Poodle. Personable and active, Schnauzer and Poodle mix dog inherits many positive characteristics from both of the parent breeds. Schnauzer dogs are known for a fierce protective nature and loyalty while Poodles are renowned for their fun-loving and clever character. Most Schnoodles exhibit these character traits though not as headstrong as the Schnauzer nor as excitable as Poodle dogs. However, with designer dog breeds such as Schnoodle, one can never be so sure of what to expect with the hybrid. Poodle Schnauzer mix puppies born in the same litter may have striking differences in sizes, colors and even in temperaments. While Poodle dogs and Schnauzer dogs come in several different sizes that range from toy to giant, the Schnoodle dog sizes may include from miniature to large sizes. Giant Schnoodles, for example, are the largest type and can weigh around 70 pounds when full-grown. Mini Schnoodles are the smallest type and weigh around 15 pounds.
Schnoodles' appearances can vary tremendously because both parents (Poodles and Schnauzers) come in several different sizes. In Poodle case, there are three Poodle types that include Toy, Miniature, and Standard while in the case of the Schnauzer they come in Giant, Standard and Miniature sizes. Additionally, the coats of both parents could differ in colors to create a vast array of coat colors that Schnauzers may inherit.
Schnoodle's facial hair is really abundant and needs to be cleaned after each meal, especially if the coat on the dog's face is left long. Schnoodle's coat texture varies a great deal ranging from tightly curled to wavy with a majority of them bearing the wavy medium length fur that is soft to the touch. Schnoodle colors may include black and white, black and tan, black, white, sable, grey, brown and apricot.

Grooming Tips

Schnoodle is a high maintenance pooch when it comes to grooming. The dog's coat doesn't shed much, making the dog hypoallergenic and more suitable for allergy sufferers. Trim your pup's coat to maintain a good look and for easier maintenance. However, you may need to visit a professional groomer every four to six months for an extensive cut.
Start grooming the Schnoodle puppy's coat as soon as he or she is 12 weeks old. Introducing grooming early in the dog's life will help the dog get comfortable with the process from an early age and Schnoodle will be comfortable accepting grooming as the dog matures.
Brushing Schnoodle dog frequently helps to remove any mats or tangles from the dog's coat. If you have a small-sized Schnoodle, bathing the dog at home shouldn't be an issue as the dog can easily fit into a bath tub. If you have a Giant Schnoodle, bathing the dog may get more complicated and many Schnauzer Poodle mix dog owners choose to have the dog bathed during a professional grooming appointment.
Brush your Schnoodle's teeth on a weekly basis to maintain good oral health. Use enzyme-based canine toothpaste and introduce dental hygiene early in the dog's life because puppies are more flexible and easier to train to accept dental procedures such as brushing teeth. Clip your Schnoodle dog's nails regularly and carefully to avoid accidentally cutting the dog's blood vessels in the nail. Do not wait for the nails to grow so long to a point of clicking on the floor. If you lack the know-how to go about it, it's advisable to consult your groomer on how to do it. Schnoodle's ears should be cleaned regularly to prevent ear infections that dogs with floppy ears are more prone to.

Scoodle (Scottish Terrier + Poodle) Breed

 

The Scoodle sometimes called the Scottiepoo or the Scottish Shoodle, is a designer dog breed that mixes the Poodle with the Scottish Terrier.
Scoodles are smart as a whip and affectionate with family, making them loyal companions. Despite their smaller size, they make good watchdogs as they’re alert and responsive.
They’re very well-suited to a home where someone is home all the time as they can be anxious when left alone for too long. A Scoodle who is left bored or anxious can become destructive. So, making sure they have plenty of stimulation is going to be necessary.
While Scoodles can make good dogs for families with older children, they’re not as tolerant of young children as other breeds. They can learn to tolerate children if socialized early but may be nippy if handled roughly or disrespected. The Scottish Terrier originated in Scotland, and that’s about all we know about the Scottish Terrier’s origins.

Grooming Tips

Scoodles don’t need an exceptionally massive amount of grooming which they owe to their Poodle heritage, but they do need at least a weekly brushing. Grooming needs will vary based on whether the dog’s coat takes more strongly after its Poodle or Scottish Terrier side of the family. A Scoodle who takes more strongly after their Poodle parent will have less intense grooming needs since their shedding will be minimized.

Scottish Deerhound Breed

 

The crisply coated Scottish Deerhound, 'Royal Dog of Scotland,' is a majestically large coursing hound struck from the ancient Greyhound template. Among the tallest of dog breeds, the Deerhound was bred to stalk the giant wild red deer. Stand back: You need a little distance to fully appreciate the majesty of this ancient beast. In silhouette we see a noble coursing hound struck from the classic Greyhound template. Deerhounds are, though, much larger and more substantial than Greyhounds, a good-size male can stand 32 inches at the shoulder and weigh 110 pounds. The crisp coat is seen in several colors; breed aficionados prefer the dark blue-gray coat. The tapered head and long neck add extra lift to an already stately hound.

Grooming Tips

The Scottish Deerhound's harsh, somewhat wiry coat is very easy to care for, requiring only an all-over brushing and combing every week or so. He will also need a trim of his nails every few weeks if they aren't worn down naturally. Grooming tools to have on hand include a slicker brush, a fine-toothed metal dog comb, and an electric nail grinder or a pair of heavy-duty dog nail clippers. A occasional bath will help to reduce any doggy odor. Grooming sessions are a good time to inspect the dog all over for any new lumps or skin problems, and to check that the eyes and ears are healthy and trouble free.

Scottish Terrier Breed

 

A solidly compact dog of vivid personality, the Scottish Terrier is an independent, confident companion of high spirits. Scotties have a dignified, almost-human character. Their terrier persistence has earned the breed the nickname 'the Diehard.' The well-known Scottie silhouette is that of a short-legged but substantial terrier with distinctive furnishings at the beard, legs, and lower body. The wiry topcoat and soft, dense undercoat coat can be black, wheaten yellow, or a brindle-stripe pattern. Bright, piercing eyes, and erect ears and tail, convey keen alertness'¿a hallmark of Britain's terrier breeds. The Scottie working style has been described as efficient and businesslike, and their aloofness toward strangers makes them excellent watchdogs. Their hunting instinct remains strong, which can complicate life for the neighbor's cat, and Scotties are known to be cantankerous around other dogs. This bold and clever Scotsman enjoys brisk walks and upbeat play.

Grooming Tips

Scottish Terriers require regularly scheduled grooming. They are a dual-coated breed, with a harsh, wiry outer layer and dense, soft undercoat. Ideally, they are hand stripped. This should be started when they are young puppies so they get used to the process. Once a month would be best once the coat is started, but they can be worked on weekly. If you are not doing it yourself, it may be hard to find a groomer who will do this for a pet. In that case it is acceptable to clipper the coat. With clipping you will eventually lose the correct harsh texture, as the undercoat will take over once the cutting process is begun. Clipped coats can be maintained on a six- to eight-week schedule. A weekly brushing and comb-out will keep the Scottie's coat tangle free and the skin healthy. Periodic baths with the grooming is acceptable with a good-quality moisturizing shampoo.

Sealyham terrier Breed

 

The Sealyham Terrier is brave and spirited, but not as spiky as smaller terriers. These sturdy, outgoing companions are recognized by their 'fall,' the mass of hair covering the forehead. Sealy fans enjoy their dog's sly sense of humor. Standing less than 11 inches at the shoulder and weighing about 24 pounds, Sealys are not big enough to be considered medium-sized dogs, but they stand among the strongest and most substantial of what we think of as small dogs. A typical Sealy is well-muscled, built low to ground, and moves easily with long, determined strides. The weatherproof coat is predominantly white, and a long, broad head is furnished with lavish facial hair. Despite their rep as the bruiser among short-legged terriers, Sealys are cute, funny, affectionate, outgoing, and trainable, if a bit stubborn. Their alertness and a big-dog bark make Sealys excellent watchdogs. Blessed with an adaptable nature, Sealys are amenable to city dwelling or country life.

Grooming Tips

The breed's weather-resistant, double 'jacket' and profuse leg and body furnishings must be combed and brushed every two or three days, as Sealy coats tend to mat easily. The coat does not shed but must be hand-stripped or clipped on a regular basis. Pet Sealyhams can be kept trimmed short with minimal furnishings, which makes their care easier. Bathing every three to four weeks is a good idea. For Sealyhams in show coat, washing at least the furnishings frequently is a must. The nails should be trimmed regularly, and the eyes and ears should be checked during grooming sessions.

Segugio Italiano Breed

 

The Segugio Italiano is a loyal and personable breed of great stamina, great heart, and impeccable intelligence. Fleet of foot and possessed of elegance, the Segugio Italiano is a tenacious hunter with superlative stamina. Its willing nature, intelligence, gentle and docile demeanor make it ideal as a companion, and well suited for people of all ages. It works diligently as an eager pet to conform to the needs of its owner. Such character, coupled with its unwavering loyalty, has made it the darling of Italy. Well-mannered and vigilant, the Segugio Italiano makes an excellent watch dog, watching both property and owner. You will find it neither aggressive nor shy, but courageous, with a cautious nature. The Segugio Italiano is not a bold breed. It is adapt to any living situation provided it has enough mental and physical exercise. The dog comes in two coat types, the Pelo Raso (short-hair) and Pelo Forte (wire-hair). Within those coat types you will find the Segit to be either fawn or black & tan with very little white visible on the coat. Both coat varieties shed, but minimally.

Grooming Tips

Given the Segugio Italiano's two coat types, a brushing once or twice a week will suffice. Due to its long ears, the ears should be cleaned regularly, kept dry and flipped over regularly to allow air into the canals to prevent ear infection. Nails should be trimmed as needed. Teeth should be checked regularly for plague build up. Specific toys and treats will help prevent dental issues along with regular brushing.

Sheepadoodle (Old English Sheepdog + Poodle) Breed

 

Sheepadoodles are a cross between the Old English Sheepdog (OES) and a Poodle. A favorite dog breed, the OES nosed its way into history as a herding dog, driving livestock to market. They can retain their ​herding instincts with young children; however, temper this attribute by channeling their energy into training, as pleasing their pack motivates them. ​Sheepadoodles are very loving, highly intelligent, and make wonderful family dogs. They do require a moderate amount of exercise and stimulation. Keep in mind the Old English Sheepdog (OES) is a "working dog" and enjoys stimulation and socialization. They can be a bit stubborn, and we recommend early training to signify who is "alpha.​The Sheepadoodle has a very hypoallergenic coat that can range from soft wavy to soft curly fleece and are the perfect choice for allergy sufferers. When crossing an OES with a poodle, you significantly increase the dog's hypoallergenic factor to nearly 100%.

Grooming Tips

Sheepadoodles are loving, intelligent, and easily trained. They do require a moderate amount of exercise and stimulation, as well as regular grooming.

Shetland Sheepdog Breed

 

The Shetland Sheepdog, also known as the Sheltie, is an extremely intelligent, quick, and obedient herder from Scotland's remote and rugged Shetland Islands. Shelties bear a strong family resemblance to their bigger cousin, the Collie. The Shetland Sheepdog is a small, active, and agile herding dog standing between 13 and 16 inches at the shoulder. The long coat is harsh and straight, with a dense undercoat, and comes in black, blue merle, and sable, with white markings. The coat, along with a long, wedge-shaped head; small, three-quarter erect ears; and deep-chested, level-backed torso, give Shelties the look of a rough-coated Collie in miniature. Bright and eager Shelties are easy trainers and world-class competitors in obedience, agility, and herding trials. They are sensitive and affectionate family dogs, highly in tune with the mood of the household. They like to bark and tend to be reserved toward strangers' two qualifications of an excellent watchdog.

Grooming Tips

The Sheltie has a profuse double coat that sheds considerably. The outer coat consists of long, straight, harsh hair, while the undercoat is short, furry, and very dense. Owners must be prepared to brush the coat weekly, and more often during shedding season, to help in removing at least some of the loose hair before it drifts all over the house. Be sure to check for mats behind the ears, under the elbow on each front leg, and in the "pants" under the tail. Shaving the dog is not recommended, because the coat protects against sunburn and heat as well as cold. The Sheltie needs a bath only occasionally. The nails should be trimmed regularly.

Shiba Inu Breed

 

An ancient Japanese breed, the Shiba Inu is a little but well-muscled dog once employed as a hunter. Today, the spirited, good-natured Shiba is the most popular companion dog in Japan. The adaptable Shiba is at home in town or country. Brought to America from Japan as recently as 60 years ago, Shibas are growing in popularity in the West and are already the most popular breed in their homeland. Their white markings combined with their coloring (red, red sesame, or black and tan) and their alert expression and smooth stride makes them almost foxlike. They're sturdy, muscular dogs with a bold, confident personality to match.

Grooming Tips

Shibas shed '¿ a lot. It has been said that they shed twice a year, but some owners quip that it lasts for six months at a time. Unless a Shiba is a "long coat," the coat does not mat, so infrequent brushing doesn't hurt the dog, but brushing or combing during periods of heavy shedding will reduce the amount of hair around the house. Blowing the dog with a strong blow-dryer or a shop vacuum in reverse is a good way to remove loose hair, dirt, and dandruff and to check for fleas. Most dogs learn to like the blower, as it feels good and doesn't scrape the skin or pull the coat. Don't let it get too hot, though. Shibas often object to nail trimming. Start a puppy early, but if it becomes a major struggle, let a professional do it.

Shih Tzu Breed

 

That face! Those big dark eyes looking up at you with that sweet expression! It's no surprise that Shih Tzu owners have been so delighted with this little 'Lion Dog' for a thousand years. Where Shih Tzu go, giggles and mischief follow. Shi Tsu (pronounced in the West 'sheed-zoo' or 'sheet-su'; the Chinese say 'sher-zer'), weighing between 9 to 16 pounds, and standing between 8 and 11 inches, are surprisingly solid for dogs their size. The coat, which comes in many colors, is worth the time you will put into it'¿few dogs are as beautiful as a well-groomed Shih Tzu. Being cute is a way of life for this lively charmer. The Shih Tzu is known to be especially affectionate with children. As a small dog bred to spend most of their day inside royal palaces, they make a great pet if you live in an apartment or lack a big backyard. Some dogs live to dig holes and chase cats, but a Shih Tzu's idea of fun is sitting in your lap acting adorable as you try to watch TV.

Grooming Tips

A Shih Tzu with a long coat requires daily brushing. Use a good-quality wire brush with flexible pins, and layer the hair to be sure you reach to the skin. A bath about every three or four weeks will help to keep the coat clean and at its best. Remember to comb the mustache and topknot daily, and gently clean the corner of the eyes with a damp cloth. To protect the Shih Tzu's eyes from being irritated, the hair on the top of the head should be trimmed short or tied up into a topknot. If you don't want to have to spend time on your dog's coat, the Shih Tzu can look adorable when clipped into a "puppy trim" by a professional groomer. Trimming nails and cleaning ears should be part of the Shih Tzu's grooming routine.

Shih-poo (Shih Tzu + Poodle) Breed

 

Being a cross between a miniature Poodle and a Shih Tzu, Shih Poos also go by other names such as Shihpoo, Shoodle, Shi-Poo and Shih-Doodle. Shih Poo hybrid dog is categorized by the sturdy, cute body along with the alert expression they usually have. Although they may be smart dogs, it's possible for them to have an in-born stubborn streak. If you find the right motivation, they are easy to train. This right motivation depends on individual dogs, as different dogs have different attitudes and personalities.
Are you looking for a small and adorable dog with lots of action? Well, then the Shih Poo is among the best you will get. The name of the dog itself is full of humor, and it will never stop making you laugh. Additionally, when natured gently, it is hypoallergenic. Shihpoo perfect pet for those with children or allergies in the family set up.
With an intoxicating zest for life, the Shih Poo is an energetic, little fun-loving designer dog breed. The Toy Poodle-Shi Tzu mix will make everyone in a family run around while chasing a ball together with him. Shihpoo doesn't require loads of exercise, but whenever he decides to play, he could be spunky and will most likely wear you down before going to rest. The dogs have a tendency of racing in the yard and around the house, and this doesn't matter so much to them. They are just like little balls full of energy bursts and always looking forward to explode with plays!
This crossbreed designer dog can be ideal for those living in small condos and apartments, as well as perfect for those with big yards in the suburbs. Being adaptable to almost any situation of living, Shih-Poos will definitely find a way of burning off the much energy they have. Due to the clown nature and magnetic personality of these adorable canines, Shih Poos will cheer you up and even make you laugh even at your saddest moment. Shih Tzu Poodle mix dog's sweet and adorable nature makes them great companions to people of all ages, especially for the people who have retired in order to enjoy friendship in the golden years of life. Nothing else will keep you smiling other than having a Shih Poo jumping in your house and around the yard.

Grooming Tips

Coats of Shih Poos can be silky and long, or curly and short, or a mixture of all these. Since it's a really new breed, it isn't easy to predict the coat type in any particular puppy. Even a single litter can contain Puppies with different coats, but they with be absolutely cute either way. Generally, the grooming requirements for the Shih Poo entirely depends on the coat type.
It is essential to brush your Shih Poo twice a week to prevent tangling and matting. Depending on the type of coat your Shih Poo has inherited, it might need to be trimmed seasonally. Skin issues can be prevented by ensuring you bathe your dog at least once a month using mild shampoo recommended by your vet. But this shouldn't be done excessively, as it's likely to damage the natural oils that keep your dog's skin soft. Shih Poo dog breeds tend to form reddish-brown stains of tear below their eyes. This is well protected by washing the face daily while wiping carefully beneath the eyes.
Don't use a bikini wax on your Shih Poo, just trim the genital area to ensure cleanliness. A groomer could also assist in shaving the lower area of the dog's belly, which prevents feces from catching up the hair around the anus. It also prevents the Shih Poo's coat from staining and stinking as a result of urine soaking up in the hair. Actually, a Shih Poo's coat will look great with professional grooming after every one month or one-and-a-half months. This helps to keep the Shih Poos coat tidy, healthy and matt-free throughout the year. You will need to trim your dog's nails each week so that they don't become curling when they are long, keep the ears dry and clean and brush the teeth using a toothpaste that has been approved by your vet. This should be done frequently or on a daily basis to prevent health teeth issues such as periodontal disease as you maintain fresh breath. Grooming should be starting early when your Shih Poo is still a puppy to ensure they don't develop grooming resistance.
In a nutshell, since neither Shih Tzus nor poodles have coats that are particularly easy, monthly trimming and daily brushing are good to maintain a mat-free fur. This is because Shih Poos have hairs of different types ranging from straight to curly, and this depends on the extent to which each favors either parent. But generally, most have coarser curly or wavy fur that is in line more with the coat of the Poodle parent. You can do baths at your discretion since the resulting mix of a Poodle and Shih Tzu is a clean dog. Skin issues that have been inherited can be warded off by regular bathing your Shih Poo.

Shikoku Breed

 

The Shikoku is a dog of marked endurance, keen in sense with a naive feeling, energetic and highly alert. He is an enthusiastic hunter and docile towards his master. The original Shikoku, or Kochi-ken, existed in the mountain ranges of Kochi Prefecture on the island of Shikoku. They were highly valued by the Matagi (Japanese hunters) as a tracker of game, particularly wild boar. He is a medium-sized dog with well-balanced and well-developed, clean-cut muscles. He has pricked ears and a curled or sickle tail. His conformation is strong, well-boned, and compact. His outer coat is rather harsh and straight and his undercoat is soft and dense. The hair on his tail is long. His coat can be red, black and tan, or sesame, which is a well-mixed color of black, red, and white hairs.

Grooming Tips

Beyond regular weekly grooming, the occasional bath will keep them clean and looking their best. Grooming can be a wonderful bonding experience for you and your dog. The strong, fast-growing nails should be trimmed regularly with a nail clipper or grinder to avoid overgrowth, splitting, and cracking. Their ears should be checked regularly to avoid a buildup of wax and debris, which can result in infection. Teeth should be brushed regularly.

Siberian Husky Breed

 

Siberian Husky, a thickly coated, compact sled dog of medium size and great endurance, was developed to work in packs, pulling light loads at moderate speeds over vast frozen expanses. Sibes are friendly, fastidious, and dignified. The graceful, medium-sized Siberian Husky's almond-shaped eyes can be either brown or blue'¿and sometimes one of each'¿and convey a keen but amiable and even mischievous expression. Quick and nimble-footed, Siberians are known for their powerful but seemingly effortless gait. Tipping the scales at no more than 60 pounds, they are noticeably smaller and lighter than their burly cousin, the Alaskan Malamute. As born pack dogs, they enjoy family life and get on well with other dogs. The Sibe's innate friendliness render them indifferent watchdogs. These are energetic dogs who can't resist chasing small animals, so secure running room is a must. An attractive feature of the breed: Sibes are naturally clean, with little doggy odor.

Grooming Tips

Siberian Huskies are considered a 'natural' breed. They are remarkably self-cleaning and often need only a few baths a year, unless being shown in conformation dog shows. Weekly brushings help keep the coat and skin in good condition. Siberians have a double coat'¿an undercoat, and guard hair. The undercoat is shed twice a year, and it is important to continually 'rake out' the old coat, using a pin brush and metal comb. Pay close attention to the length of the nails, and keep them trimmed to prevent any foot problems. Siberians competing in conformation require a bit more selective grooming for the best presentation.

Silky Terrier Breed

 

A charming member of the AKC Toy Group, the compact, glossy-coated Silky Terrier is nonetheless a true terrier of energetic high spirits. The Silky, a native of Sydney, Australia, is larger than his close cousin, the Yorkshire Terrier. Small but not fragile, feisty but not yappy, pretty but not sculpted, Silkys are 10-inch-tall dynamos animated by curiosity and high spirits. The glorious blue-and-tan coat is straight and glossy, and it feels and behaves much like human hair. The wedge-shaped head is topped by profuse hair parted down the middle, and erect V-shaped ears draw attention to the keen, piercing expression of the almond-shaped eyes. Silkys are more refined than typical ratting terriers, but they should still look and behave like a true earthdog.

Grooming Tips:

The Silky Terrier's coat should be brushed at least twice a week with a pin brush or soft bristle brush. A long-toothed metal dog comb can also come in handy for gently working through areas where tangles may be beginning to form. Left unattended, tangles and mats are uncomfortable for your dog and can cause skin problems to develop. The nails should be trimmed once a month, and a bath every four to six weeks with a gentle shampoo meant for dogs will help to keep the coat and skin clean and healthy. Grooming sessions are a good time to check the dog all over for any new lumps or skin problems, and to check that the eyes and ears are healthy and trouble free.Source

Sloughi Breed

 

The ancient Sloughi, nicknamed the 'Arabian Greyhound,' is a lean, swift coursing hound who hunted a variety of game in North African deserts. A classic sighthound, the Sloughi is regally aloof with strangers and gentle with loved ones. The Sloughi (SLOO-ghee) is a classically constructed sighthound of ancient lineage, originally bred to work on such game as the hare, fox, jackal, gazelle, and wild pigs on the punishing terrain of its homeland. This is a lean, no-frills hound standing between 24 to 29 inches at the shoulder. Coat colors include shades of light sand to mahogany red-fawn, with or without brindling, with or without black markings, with no invasive white markings. The Sloughi's big, dark eyes are often described as 'melancholy.'

Grooming Tips

The Sloughi's short, smooth, and fine coat requires very little in the way of maintenance. Weekly brushing with a soft bristle brush or a hound glove should keep it smooth and sleek. An occasional bath can help to keep the hound clean-smelling. The ears should be regularly inspected and cleaned if needed. The nails should be trimmed regularly as needed, as overly long nails can cause the dog discomfort.

Slovakian Wirehaired Pointer Breed

 

Slovakian Wirehaired Pointer is a dog of moderate strength, working type, but with nobleness in his lines. The basic color of the coat is called 'grey' and the hair is harsh (hard). He must be fit and able to work on the plain, in the woods and in the water, and especially to work after the shooting, searching and retrieving wounded game. He is obedient and easy to train.

Grooming Tips

The Slovakian Wirehaired Pointer requires only minimal grooming to maintain their good condition. Wiping them down with a damp cloth is usually sufficient in between baths. Using a grooming mitt or shedding knife on their coat during shedding season can help keep down the amount of hair they shed in your home. Toenails should be trimmed every four weeks. A dental care regimen should be begun at an early age to avoid issues later in life.

Slovensky Cuvac Breed